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Shorter tuberculosis treatment regimens will reduce costs for patients
Infection Control Today
Shorter tuberculosis treatment regimens will reduce the out-of-pocket expenses incurred by both patients and their family members, who often act as the patients' guardians. In addition, shorter tuberculosis regimens may allow an earlier return to productive activities for patients and their families.
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Fasting triggers stem cell regeneration of damaged, old immune system
HealthCanal
In the first evidence of a natural intervention triggering stem cell-based regeneration of an organ or system, a study in the June 5 issue of the Cell Stem Cell shows that cycles of prolonged fasting not only protect against immune system damage — a major side effect of chemotherapy — but also induce immune system regeneration, shifting stem cells from a dormant state to a state of self-renewal. In both mice and a human clinical trial, long periods of not eating significantly lowered white blood cell counts.
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Stem cells hold keys to body's plan
Case Western Reserve University via ScienceDaily
Landmarks within pluripotent stem cells that guide how they develop to serve different purposes within the body have been discovered by researchers. This breakthrough offers promise that scientists eventually will be able to direct stem cells in ways that prevent disease or repair damage from injury or illness.
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The 4th case of mad cow disease ever reported in the US confirmed
Smithsonian
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has confirmed the fourth case of what's known as mad cow disease — a variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease — in a U.S. citizen. The victim recently died in Texas, and a brain autopsy confirmed the diagnosis.
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New gene tests may give cancer patients quicker path to treatment
Reuters
A new way of evaluating tumors may soon help cancer patients identify the underlying genetic link to their disease — and the best possible treatment — all in a single test. Researchers are set to begin clinical trials using a more comprehensive testing method that looks for all of the known genes that may be active in a tumor.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword CANCER.




Fetal cells function in Parkinson's brains years later
Medscape
Evaluating the efficacy of fetal grafts to treat Parkinson's disease takes many years, confirming earlier findings that the cells retain activity and normal morphology up to 14 years later. The study was published online June 5 in Cell Reports.
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The FDA is going after drug-resistant bugs
Courthouse News Service
The Food and Drug Administration has issued a list of pathogens likely to pose a serious threat to public health to encourage the development of new drugs to treat them. This action implements a provision of the Generating Antibiotic Incentives Now title of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act.
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Synthetic small molecule may help chemotherapy get into brain
Medical News Today
In a new study on mice, researchers show it is possible to deliver drugs to fight cancer and other diseases into the brain via the bloodstream using a small molecule to carry them. Reporting in the journal PLOS ONE, the team, from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, says the synthetic peptide carrier can ferry the drugs across the blood-brain barrier without them having to be modified.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Sneaky bacteria change key protein's shape to escape detection (Journal of the American Chemical Society)
ID update 2014: New threats, old antibiotics (Medscape)
Report: Pancreatic cancer 2nd most deadly by 2030 (CNN)
Amber discovery indicates Lyme disease is older than human race (Oregon State University via Phys.org)

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Many Lyme tests unnecessary
Medscape
A new Lyme disease testing report by investigators from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that 62 percent of the 3.4 million serologic tests done by large commercial laboratories nationwide in 2008 adhered to the recommended two-tiered antibody testing approach. However, just 12 percent of the 2.4 million patients tested were infected with Borrelia burgdorferi, the researchers report in an article published online May 30 in Clinical Infectious Diseases.
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Insufficient exercise compromises survival of breast cancer survivors
Medical News Today
Breast cancer patients who do not get sufficient exercise may compromise quality of life and ultimately, survival, according to a new study from researchers at the department of epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The study, published in the online peer-reviewed publication of the American Cancer Society, Cancer, indicates a need for significant enhancements to promote and encourage participation in physical activity to breast cancer patients during and beyond treatment.
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TRENDING ARTICLE
Shorter tuberculosis treatment regimens will reduce costs for patients
Infection Control Today
Shorter tuberculosis treatment regimens will reduce the out-of-pocket expenses incurred by both patients and their family members, who often act as the patients' guardians. In addition, shorter tuberculosis regimens may allow an earlier return to productive activities for patients and their families.

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read more
Sneaky bacteria change key protein's shape to escape detection
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Every once in a while in the U.S., bacterial meningitis seems to crop up out of nowhere, claiming a young life. Part of the disease's danger is the ability of the bacteria to evade the body's immune system, but scientists are now figuring out how the pathogen hides in plain sight. Their findings, which could help defeat these bacteria and others like it, appear in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

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'High-priority' chemicals that may cause breast cancer named
Medical News Today
An estimated 12.4 percent of women born in the U.S. today will develop breast cancer at some point during their lives. Now, a new study has identified 17 "high-priority" chemicals women should avoid in order to reduce increased risk of breast cancer and demonstrates how their presence can be detected.

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Midlife hypertension affects BP-cognition link in old age
Medscape
Knowledge of blood pressure in midlife is crucial to understanding the link between blood pressure and cognitive impairment in old age, a new study suggests. The study — part of the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility study, which has been following a population from Iceland since 1967 — found that the relationship between blood pressure and brain changes consistent with cognitive impairment in late life depended on whether the individual had a history of hypertension in midlife.
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