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Home   About   Scholarships   Meetings   Publications   Resources   Jun. 11, 2013

 



Promising cancer drugs empower body's own defense system
The New York Times
The early success of a new class of cancer drugs, revealed in test results released in Chicago recently, has raised hope among the world’s top cancer specialists that they may be on the verge of an important milestone in the fight against the disease. The drugs, still generally in early testing, work in an entirely new way, by unleashing the immune system to attack cancer cells much as it attacks bacteria.
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New hepatitis C diagnosis and treatment
By Rosemary Sparacio
Hepatitis C, a liver disease that results from infection with the hepatitis C virus, can range in severity from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious, lifelong illness. The infection is often asymptomatic, but chronic infection can lead to liver diseases, which can become apparent after many years. Several new options are emerging that could change the way hepatitis C is treated.
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Industry Pulse: Which new treatment offers the most promise for hepatitis C?
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Scientists pinpoint genetic traits of cells that give rise to gliomas
The Medical News
A multi-institutional team of researchers have pinpointed the genetic traits of the cells that give rise to gliomas — the most common form of malignant brain cancer. The findings, which appear in the journal Cell Reports, provide scientists with rich new potential set of targets to treat the disease.
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Key medication for Lyme disease in short supply
St. Cloud Times
With the U.S. now in peak tick season, an antibiotic commonly used to treat Lyme disease is in short supply, and some politicians are calling for the federal government to do something about it. Almost 30,000 cases of Lyme disease were reported nationwide in 2011, which makes it the sixth-most commonly reported infectious disease in the United States, according to federal officials.
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More breast-feeding could lower breast cancer rates by thousands
CBS News
Breast-feeding isn't only good for the developing infant: It helps mom out too. A study published in Obstetrics & Gynecology revealed that if people stuck with the recommended length of breast-feeding their newborn for at least one year, there would be 5,000 fewer cases of breast cancer, 54,000 fewer cases of hypertension and almost 14,000 less heart attacks in women each year.
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15 percent of reusable endoscopes contaminated with harmful bacteria
Medical News Today
Unacceptable levels of "bio dirt" were identified in three out of 20 scopes used to examine GI tracts and colons across five different hospitals in the U.S, according to a new study conducted in the U.S. Investigators found that 30 percent, 24 percent, and 3 percent of the scopes, respectively, failed to pass the cleanliness rating.
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Michael Douglas' throat cancer comments thrust HPV discussion to fore
CBS News
VideoBriefMichael Douglas is drawing worldwide attention. In an interview, he appeared to blame his throat cancer on oral sex and HPV, a sexually transmitted disease. One expert celebrated Douglas' openness about the subject, but questioned his comment's accuracy.
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Hurricane Sandy may mean more West Nile virus, experts warn
Staten Island Advance
Concerns about an increase in cases of West Nile virus occurring on Staten Island after Hurricane Sandy might not be farfetched — one study done after Hurricane Katrina found an increase in cases of the illness in areas of Louisiana and Mississippi hit hardest by that storm. "Hurricanes and natural disasters in the U.S. very rarely increase mosquito-transmitted disease outbreaks," said Dr. Kevin A. Caillouet, one of the study's authors. "But you need to be vigilant for it."
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Next generation genetic testing for breast cancer
KERA-FM
More and more women are inquiring about genetic testing for breast cancer. And for good reason: as many as five to ten percent of all cancers may be linked to an inherited risk.
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Battle brews over FDA regulation of laboratory-developed tests
Reuters via Thomson Reuters
A dispute is heating up over whether diagnostic tests developed for use by laboratories at their own facilities should be subject to regulation by the Food and Drug Administration. Traditionally, the FDA has not required laboratories to obtain approval for their in-house diagnostic tests. Laboratories are regulated by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988. But that may be about to change.
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Study supports future possibility of personalized medicine for cervical cancer
Washington University School of Medicine via The Medical News
Doctors at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that testing cervical tumors before treatment for vulnerability to chemotherapy predicts whether patients will do well or poorly with standard treatment. The study supports the future possibility of personalized medicine for cervical cancer, a tumor normally addressed with a one-size-fits-all approach.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword CERVICAL CANCER




In clinical trial, scientists hope to train immune system to attack cancer
Stanford University Medical Center via Medical Xpress
Training our immune systems to fight cancer is an appealing prospect. But the process is a bit like learning to spot a single traitor in a stadium full of innocent bystanders.
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Alaska fights persistent infectious diseases
KDLG-FM
Combating Alaska's disproportionately high STD rates are a big focus of the state's epidemiologists. But the state is struggling with other persistent infectious diseases. A new report from the state sheds gives a look at the status of a few diseases.
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Promising cancer drugs empower body's own defense system
The New York Times
The early success of a new class of cancer drugs has raised hope among the world's top cancer specialists that they may be on the verge of an important milestone in the fight against the disease. The drugs work in an entirely new way, by unleashing the immune system to attack cancer cells much as it attacks bacteria.

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On the front lines of food safety
The New York Times
With piles of fresh strawberries beckoning consumers at markets and stores this season, an alliance of a major retailer, fruit growers and farm workers has begun a program in an effort to prevent the types of bacterial outbreaks of salmonella, listeria or E.coli that have sickened consumers.

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Researchers develop mathematical models to better combat HIV
Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics via Infection Control Today
The first few hours to days following exposure to human immunodeficiency virus can be of critical importance in determining if infection occurs in a patient. But the low numbers of viruses and infected cells at this stage makes it very difficult to study these events in humans or animal models.

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Prolonged antifungals effective against Cryptococcus gattii
Reuters Health via Medscape Medical News
Prolonged antifungal therapy is an important component of treatment of cryptococcosis due to Cryptococcus gattii, according to Australian researchers. Although still very rare, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention describe C. gattii as an emerging infection with 100 infections documented in the U.S. between 2004 and 2011.
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Social networks are tools to fight against infectious diseases in wild chimps
University of Georgia via The Medical News
Many think of social networks in terms of Facebook friends and Twitter followers, but for recent University of Georgia doctoral graduate Julie Rushmore, social networks are tools in the fight against infectious diseases. Rushmore, who completed her doctorate in the Odum School of Ecology in May, analyzed the social networks of wild chimpanzees to determine which individuals were most likely to contract and spread pathogens.
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