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Home   About   Scholarships   Meetings   Publications   Resources   July 07, 2015

 



CDC awards $216 million to organizations to deliver the most effective HIV prevention strategies
Infection Control Today
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has announced that it has awarded $216 million over five years to 90 community-based organizations nationwide to deliver effective HIV prevention strategies to those at greatest risk, including people of color, men who have sex with men, transgender individuals and people who inject drugs.
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Regenerative medicine biologists discover a cellular structure that explains fate of stem cells
UT Southwestern Medical Center via ScienceDaily
Researchers have found a previously unidentified mechanism that helps explain why stem cells undergo self-renewing divisions, but their offspring do not.
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Wearable health-monitoring devices could alter traditional role of pathologists as gatekeepers of medical laboratory test data
DARK Daily
Traditionally, medical laboratories have been the gatekeepers for the lab test data of most patients. After all, it is regularly said that 70 percent or more of a patient's permanent health record is made up of clinical laboratory test data. However, several market forces are at play that could eat away at the long-standing role of medical laboratories as the primary gatekeepers of patient test data.
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Measles kills 1st patient in 12 years
USA Today
The U.S. has suffered its first measles death in 12 years, according to Washington state health officials. The woman's measles was undetected when she was alive and was confirmed only through an autopsy, according to the Washington State Department of Health. The woman's name was not released, but officials said she lived in Clallam County, Washington.
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Engineered particles 'may become antibiotics of the future'
Medical News Today
There is a pressing need for new approaches to fight harmful bacteria as the global threat of rising drug resistance appears set to outpace the rate at which we can produce new antibiotics to fight deadly infections like tuberculosis. Now, researchers in the field of synthetic biology have addressed this challenge in a different way. They have engineered particles called "phagemids" that enter targeted harmful bacteria and release toxins that kill them.
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High-resolution image of Ebola virus reveals how it evades the immune system
Medical News Today
By creating the highest-resolution image of the Ebola virus to date, researchers from the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California, have identified a viral protein that helps the virus to escape attack from the immune system, shedding light on how Ebola infection could be prevented. Senior study author Erica Ollmann Saphire, director of the Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Consortium and professor at the Scripps Research Institute, and colleagues published the details of their findings in the journal Cell Reports.
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Many US AIDS patients still die when 'opportunistic' infections strike
HealthDay News
Even after the advent of powerful medications for suppressing HIV, a new study finds that more than one-third of people in San Francisco who were diagnosed with an AIDS-related infection died within five years. "The main cause of mortality arises from people stopping treatment entirely," said Dr. Robert Grant, a professor at the University of California, San Francisco, who reviewed the findings but was not involved in the research.
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Multiple pathways progressing to Alzheimer's disease
Health Canal
The amyloid cascade hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease posits that sticky aggregations or plaques of amyloid-beta peptides accumulate over time in the brain, triggering a series of events that ultimately result in the full-blown neurodegenerative disorder. The hypothesis has been a major driver of Alzheimer's research for more than 20 years.
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Nanoparticles target and kill cancer stem cells that drive tumor growth
American Chemical Society
Many cancer patients survive treatment only to have a recurrence within a few years. Recurrences and tumor spreading are likely due to cancer stem cells that can be tough to kill with conventional cancer drugs. But now researchers have designed nanoparticles that specifically target these hardy cells to deliver a drug. The nanoparticle treatment, reported in the journal ACS Nano, worked far better than the drug alone in mice.
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New drug squashes cancer's last-ditch efforts to survive
Salk Institute for Biological Studies via Lab Manager
As a tumor grows, its cancerous cells ramp up an energy-harvesting process to support its hasty development. This process, called autophagy, is normally used by a cell to recycle damaged organelles and proteins, but is also co-opted by cancer cells to meet their increased energy and metabolic demands.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Lab-made blood to enter human trials in 2 years (Medical News Today)
Nanoparticle 'wrapper' delivers chemical that stops fatty buildup in rodent arteries (Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine via Lab Manager)
Researchers mass-producing stem cells to satisfy the demands of regenerative medicine (Agency for Science, Technology and Research via Phys.org)
New rapid Ebola test shows promise in African clinics (HealthDay News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 



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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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