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Home   About   Scholarships   Meetings   Publications   Resources   July 14, 2015

 



Tricking the immune system
University of California, Davis via Lab Manager
The bacteria that cause Lyme disease are able to trick an animal's immune system into not launching a full-blown immune response or developing lasting immunity to the disease, report researchers at the University of California, Davis. The discovery may explain why some human patients remain vulnerable to repeat infections by the same strain of bacteria, especially in regions where Lyme disease is prevalent.
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Blood culture not useful in pediatric uncomplicated skin infections
Reuters via Consultant for Pediatricians
Immunocompetent children with uncomplicated superficial skin and soft tissue infections do not need to undergo blood cultures upon hospital admission, the authors of a new retrospective study conclude. Blood cultures are often performed in patients with skin and soft tissue infections who are hospitalized for parenteral antibiotic treatment, Dr. Susanna Hernandez-Bou of Hospital Sant Joan de Deu Barcelona in Spain and her colleagues write in their report, online June 10 in The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal.
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Study of gene mutations in aplastic anemia may help optimize treament
National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute via Medical Xpress
Scientists have identified a group of genetic mutations in patients with aplastic anemia, which likely will help doctors optimize treatment for this rare and deadly blood condition. The study, appearing in the New England Journal of Medicine, could lead to tailor-made treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients as part of the emerging precision medicine movement.
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Aplastic anemia: Mutations linked to clinical outcomes
Medscape
Some mutations in patients with aplastic anemia influence the response to therapy and long-term disease outcomes, according to a genomic cohort study by Dr. Tetsuichi Yoshizato from the Department of Pathology and Tumor Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Japan, and colleagues, published in the July 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. Investigators performed next-generation sequencing and array-based karyotyping using 668 blood samples from 439 patients with aplastic anemia from the United States and Japan. Eighty-two had serial samples.
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White House: Open to working with Congress on disease research bill
Reuters
The White House said it was open to working with Congress on a bill that would invest in disease research and would be paid for with sales of oil from U.S. emergency reserves. The House of Representatives is considering a bipartisan bill that would increase funding for the U.S. National Institutes of Health and the Food and Drug Administration to boost research and approvals of new treatments for rare diseases.
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Early HIV treatment improves survival in some patients with newly diagnosed TB
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences via Infection Control Today
Starting anti-HIV treatment within two weeks of the diagnosis of tuberculosis improved survival among patients with both infections who had very low immune-cell counts, according to an analysis by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Health. Those with strong immune systems, however, might benefit from waiting until after the end of the six-month TB treatment before initiating anti-HIV therapy, they found.
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Harvard University researchers turn Bubble Wrap into tiny test tubes that could be used for clinical pathology laboratory testing in developing nations
DARK Daily
By turning Bubble Wrap into a cheap alternative to glass test tubes and culture dishes, Harvard University scientists may have found a way to cushion clinical laboratories in developing countries from the high cost of basic lab gear. This latest discovery is significant because it adds to the growing number of in vitro diagnostic testing systems that potentially can generate results as accurate as those produced in today's state-of-the-art medical laboratories, but at a much lower cost.
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Spit-and-stick test could be biomarker for HNSCC
Medscape
It's early days yet, but a simple test that looks for tumor DNA shed in saliva and plasma could serve as a biomarker and screening tool for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, reports a team of investigators. Somatic mutations or human papillomavirus — collectively referred to as tumor DNA — were identified in saliva samples from 71 of 93 patients with HNSCC and in the blood of 41 of 47 of those who also provided plasma samples.
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Cholera vaccine helps prevent serious illness
HealthDay News
An vaccine in a pill protects children and adults against severe cholera, a new study shows. Cholera is an infectious disease spread through contaminated water and food. It is typically found in hot, tropical climates, the researchers explained.
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Time to become familiar with babesiosis?
Medscape
VideoBriefAs written by Dr. Paul G. Auwaerter, "I am Paul Auwaerter with the Division of Infectious Diseases at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Babesiosis is an infection that few people have encountered unless they happen to live in the coastal areas of New England where the disease has historically been present."
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New biomarker may predict suicide
Medscape
Elevated activation of the kynurenine pathway may be an objective signal of suicidality in adolescents with major depressive disorder, new research indicates. In a study of 50 depressed teens with major depressive disorder, kynurenine pathway activation was elevated in those with a history of suicide attempt and those who were acutely suicidal, but not in those who were not suicidal.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Wearable health-monitoring devices could alter traditional role of pathologists as gatekeepers of medical laboratory test data (DARK Daily)
Measles kills 1st patient in 12 years (USA Today)
Many US AIDS patients still die when 'opportunistic' infections strike (HealthDay News)
CDC awards $216 million to organizations to deliver the most effective HIV prevention strategies (Infection Control Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 



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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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