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Home   About   Scholarships   Meetings   Publications   Resources   Jul. 30, 2013

 



Spread of HAIs rapidly becomes $45 billion national crisis
FierceHealthcare
Hospital-acquired infections are spreading at an alarming rate, with 1.7 million Americans developing them each year at a cost of up to $45 billion, according to the Alliance for Aging Research. The deadly and costly infections are becoming a national crisis, medical experts said during a call-in event recently announcing the Alliance's release of a new fact sheet about the growing problem. An estimated 99,000 people die from these infections each year and the numbers are expected to grow as the rate of infection rises and more Americans develop resistance to antibiotics.
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Do breast implants affect breast cancer survival?
Medscape Medical News
Information is widely available on the risks and possible adverse outcomes associated with breast augmentation surgery; nonetheless, there is widespread concern about its possible long-term health effects. Epidemiologic studies have shown no increased risk for breast cancer in women with breast implants compared with those without them, but studies on survival after breast cancer diagnosis in women with implants have produced uncertain results.
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HPV vaccine uptake lagging
MedPage Today
It appears that the steady progress that was being made in getting adolescent girls to receive the human papillomavirus vaccine may have stalled. Although the percentage of 13- to 17-year-old girls who had received at least one dose of HPV vaccine increased from 25.1 percent in 2007 to 53 percent in 2011, there was very little change from 2011 to 2012 (53.8 percent), according to Shannon Stokley, MPH, of the CDC's immunization services division in Atlanta, and colleagues.
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  CellaVision Automates and Standardizes the Manual Differential

CellaVision introduces CellAtlas®, the perfect way to learn the basics of hematology cell morphology. This App for the Apple iPhone and iPod Touch compliments our digital cell morphology portfolio, and is an educational tool to assist in the recognition and classification of blood cells, by utilizing mini-lectures and cell quizzes. More
 


More than 300 infected with cyclospora illness across 14 states
Nature World News
Cases of the intestinal illness cyclospora continue to spread around the country, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported, adding several new states and New York City to the growing list of places where the infection has been documented. The source of the widespread outbreak of cyclospora is still unknown as reports of the infection spread to 15 U.S. states
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Women's height linked with cancer
USA Today
Taller women are at higher risk of developing cancer, but that doesn't mean taller women need more mammograms or that shorter women should skip screening tests, a new study says. Some genetic variations involving height have been linked to cancer risk, the study authors say. Tall people also have more cells and larger organs, increasing chances of mutations.
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Diabetic campers in Massachusetts test 'bionic pancreas'
Telegram & Gazette
An automated system that can check blood-glucose levels of a diabetic 12 times per hour, including while the person sleeps, will be tested on 32 campers in Oxford, Mass., by summer's end. The system also pumps to the patient insulin and glucagon, to lower and raise blood glucose, respectively, through a "bionic pancreas device."
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California campaign urges hepatitis B screening
San Jose Mercury News
The campaign battling deadly hepatitis B could not have come up with a better poster child than former California Assemblywoman Fiona Ma. Ma didn't realize that she suffered from chronic hepatitis B until she appeared at an awareness campaign six years ago — and a doctor pulled her aside to quietly inform her.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword HEPATITIS




C difficile infection linked to proton pump inhibitors
Medscape Medical News
In addition to reducing inappropriate antibiotic use and providing better infection control in outpatient settings, strategies to control Clostridium difficile infection should include further examination of outpatient and household settings and a reduction in proton pump inhibitor use, according to an article published in a recent issue JAMA Internal Medicine.
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How to get the most from a professional conference
By Dave Bowman
You've signed up to attend a professional conference focused on your field or industry and, as the conference date approaches, you finalize your travel arrangements and prepare for several days of learning and exploration. With numerous educational sessions, many booths in the expo hall and evening events, you'll have a myriad of ways to broaden your industry knowledge, find new sources of products and services, and connect with colleagues. Trying to squeeze education, vendor visits and networking into three days may leave you feeling like you're drinking from a fire hose.
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Industry Pulse: What is the most important tip for attending conferences?
ANSWER NOW


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Why breast cancer is more likely to kill black women
Los Angeles Times
A diagnosis of breast cancer is more likely to lead to early death for black women than for white women, a disparity that's mainly the result of having more health problems before cancer develops, new research shows. Of the black women on Medicare who were told they had breast cancer, 55.9 percent were still alive five years later. That compared with 68.8 percent of white women who were the same age, lived in the same area and were diagnosed in the same year, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Assn.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Infectious disease diagnosis: New guideline on lab tests (Medscape Medical News)
Surgeon's smart knife detects cancer cells in tumor operations (HealthDay News)
Depression, certain antidepressants linked to C. difficile infection (Infectious Disease Special Edition)
100,000 children vaccinated during MMR catch-up campaign (TopNews United States)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Study: Recently emerged MERS virus less infectious than SARS
HealthDay News
Important differences between Middle East respiratory syndrome and severe acute respiratory syndrome suggest that MERS won't prove as dangerous as SARS, researchers report. An analysis of clinical records, laboratory results and other data revealed that older people, men and patients with chronic health problems are more likely to succumb to the disease, the investigators said.
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Vendors introduce software to improve test ordering, results reporting
Dark Daily
In recent weeks the Department of Health and Human Services announced that more than 50 percent of doctors and 80 percent of eligible hospitals would be using electronic health record systems by the end of 2013. Despite increased connectivity, clinical laboratories have had create interfaces between their laboratory information systems and the EHRs of their client physicians and hospitals.
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Researcher warns against complacency in infectious diseases fight
The ABC
One of the scientists responsible for creating the first designer anti-viral drug has warned against complacency in the fight against infectious diseases. Professor Mark von Itzstein helped develop Relenza to fight off influenza. He's now worried about the threat of infectious diseases spreading to new areas.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
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TRENDING ARTICLE
Spread of HAIs rapidly becomes $45 billion national crisis
FierceHealthcare
Hospital-acquired infections are spreading at an alarming rate, with 1.7 million Americans developing them each year at a cost of up to $45 billion, according to the Alliance for Aging Research. An estimated 99,000 people die from these infections each year and the numbers are expected to grow as the rate of infection rises and more Americans develop resistance to antibiotics.

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read more
Infectious disease diagnosis: New guideline on lab tests
Medscape Medical News
Microbiological diagnoses based on laboratory testing directly affect patient care and outcomes, including hospital infection control, duration of hospitalization and laboratory efficiency, according to new guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the American Society for Microbiology.

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Surgeon's smart knife detects cancer cells in tumor operations
HealthDay News
A new technique based on an "intelligent knife" helps avoid repeat cancer surgeries. The iKnife sniffs the "smoke" created by the electrosurgical removal of cancerous tissue and tells the surgeon almost immediately if the tissue it has come from is healthy or cancerous.

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New tick-borne disease waits in the woods
Scientific American
In many parts of the country ticks spread illness, including Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Add to that list a new scourge — Heartland virus, which doesn't respond to treatment.
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Women are more vulnerable to infections
Nature
Sabra Klein's research on influenza viruses in mice, presented at a meeting in Montreal, Canada, helps explain why women are more susceptible to death and disease from infectious pathogens — and the reason is intimately linked with reproduction. To Klein, the fact that women generally suffer more severe flu symptoms than men suggests that women quickly mount a substantial immune-system attack to clear infections — and suffer the consequences of the inflammatory responses that flood their systems.
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Pro baseball players wonder if stadium is to blame for brain cancer
USA Today
Darren Daulton, star catcher on the Philadelphia Phillies' beloved 1993 World Series team, is in a fight for his life at age 51. He was diagnosed with glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of brain cancer, the fifth member of the Major League Baseball franchise struck by the disease. A lot of people, former Phillies included, want to know if the illnesses are just bad luck or if there is some sort of connection — perhaps to Veterans Stadium, the multipurpose sports venue that was home to the franchise from 1971 to 2003 and demolished in 2004.
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