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Home   About   Scholarships   Meetings   Publications   Resources   August 18, 2015

 



Scientists discover new liver-regenerating cells
Medical News Today
Among the organs of the human body, the liver has the highest capacity to regenerate. How the liver manages to repair itself, however, has largely been subject to debate. Now, a new study has revealed a previously unidentified group of cells that can regenerate liver tissue without forming tumors.
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Spread of cancer from pancreas arises from the interactions of multiple types of wayward cells
Health Canal
Tumor cells associated with pancreatic cancer often behave like communities by working with each other to increase tumor spread and growth to different organs. Groups of these cancer cells are better than single cancer cells in driving tumor spread, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
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Breakthrough in 'marriage-broker' protein
McGill University via Lab Manager
Scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital at McGill University and the McGill University Health Centre have made a breakthrough in understanding an important protein that appears to act as a kind of cellular "marriage broker." The protein called netrin-1 brings cells together and maintains their healthy relationships.
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Many pathologists participate in Medicare's quality reporting and e-prescribing programs, but 40 percent of providers opt for penalties over compliance
DARK Daily
Many pathologists are aware of Medicare's Physician Quality Reporting System and Electronic-Prescribing Incentive Program. But what is less known is that up to 40 percent of eligible doctors nationwide are opting to not participate and thus get paid less money from the Medicare program. That high rate of nonparticipation is not true for one group of practitioners, however.
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New hope for vaccine against germ that causes 'mono'
HealthDay News
Mononucleosis: It's a fatiguing disease that lays low thousands of Americans — usually young people — each year. But new, early research offers hope for a vaccine against the virus that's thought to trigger most cases of the illness.
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Tdap booster vaccine rates triple at family care clinics using automated reminders
University of Michigan Health System via ScienceDaily
Electronic reminders at clinics helped boost rates of Tdap booster that protects against tetanus, diptheria and whooping cough, a study shows. Guidelines recommend that adolescents and adults ages 11 and up receive a single dose of the Tdap vaccine for booster immunization even if they have had a tetanus and diphtheria vaccine within the past 10 years.
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New research helps explain why lymphoma often affects children with malaria
Rockefeller University via Infection Control Today
In equatorial Africa, a region of the globe known as the "lymphoma belt," children are 10 times more likely than in other parts of the world to develop Burkitt's lymphoma, a highly aggressive blood cancer that can be fatal if left untreated. That area is also plagued by high rates of malaria, and scientists have spent the last 50 years trying to understand how the two diseases are connected.
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Scientists use bioengineered yeast instead of poppies to make opioids
Reuters
Scientists have invented a speedy method to make potent painkilling opioids using bioengineered baker's yeast instead of poppies, but need to fine-tune the process to make it commercially viable, according to a study. The new method, if it can be made more efficient, could significantly change the multibillion-dollar pain medication manufacturing business, but raises concerns about aggravating the growing problem of opioid abuse.
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Testing for more breast cancer genes offers useful information
Reuters via Fox News
When the results of a test wouldn't change how doctors manage a patient's care, most say it's not worth doing. But new tests for breast cancer risk mutations beyond the well-known BRCA genes would offer actionable information for many women and their doctors, a new study finds.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Study: HIV cells keep duplicating even when treatments are working (HealthDay News)
Clot-busting nanocapsule could 'revolutionize stroke and heart attack treatment' (Medical News Today)
CDC: 37,000 US infection-related deaths preventable over 5 years (Reuters)
ICD-10 conversion could put financial squeeze on clinical laboratories and pathology groups (DARK Daily)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 



ASCLS eNewsBytes

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Katina Smallwood, Senior Editor, 469.420.2675   
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