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Home   About   Scholarships   Meetings   Publications   Resources   September 01, 2015

 



Blood test may predict breast cancer relapse
HealthDay News
An experimental blood test may one day detect the return of early stage breast cancer months before it is revealed by CT or MRI scans, researchers report. Initial treatment with surgery or chemotherapy can miss some cancer cells. The new test can detect DNA shed by tumors into the bloodstream before these stray cancer cells invade other organs, the British researchers said.
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Ebola may persist in wastewater for at least 8 days
Medical News Today
New research finds that Ebola can survive in detectable concentrations in wastewater for eight days — a finding that has implications for the disposal of contaminated liquid waste during epidemics and outbreaks. The study, by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh, Drexel University and the National Institutes of Health, is published in Environmental Science & Technology Letters.
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1st trial targeting mutation, not cancer type, gives mixed results
Reuters
A powerful skin cancer drug may also be effective against lung cancer and other types of malignancies, according to a novel study that focused on a gene mutation seen in many kinds of tumors. This sort of study is "the new wave," said Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society, who wasn't involved in the research.
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Clinical pathology laboratories stand to benefit as patients gain control over their healthcare spending through high-deductible health plans
DARK Daily
High-deductible health plans are increasing in popularity as more consumers opt for lower annual premium costs in exchange for larger out-of-pocket expenses. This shift in health insurance could result in direct benefits for smaller clinical laboratories and pathology groups as more patients have a choice in where they purchase medical laboratory testing services.
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New test for antibiotic drug resistance could be a game changer
Forbes
VideoBriefBacteria have evolved many ways to defend themselves against antibiotics, resulting in devastating infections resistant to many antibiotics. Dr. Michael Mahan and colleagues from University of California, Santa Barbara, have discovered an important and novel way bacteria evade our defenses.
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Cellular contamination conundrum solved
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory via Lab Manager
Scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have reported a major advance in understanding the biological chemistry of radioactive metals, opening up new avenues of research into strategies for remedial action in the event of possible human exposure to nuclear contaminants. Research led by Rebecca Abergel, working with the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, has found that plutonium, americium and other actinides can be transported into cells by an antibacterial protein called siderocalin, which is normally involved in sequestering iron.
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Genetic test impacts chemotherapy choices in surprising ways
Time
In the new era of personalized medicine, having more information on hand is considered the ideal situation for making more customized, and ideally, effective decisions about medical care. And in a new study of breast cancer patients, researchers show that a relatively new genetic test for evaluating tumors is doing just that.
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Immunotherapy agent benefits patients with drug-resistant multiple myeloma
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute via ScienceDaily
In its first clinical trial, a breakthrough antibody therapy produced at least partial remissions in a third of patients with multiple myeloma who had exhausted multiple prior treatments, investigators report.
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HIV testing among older adults is declining, despite CDC recommendation
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health via Infection Control Today
Researchers led by the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health examined HIV testing trends among adults ages 50 through 64 both before and after 2006, when the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended that most doctors automatically screen all patients for HIV regardless of whether they have symptoms. The researchers found that gains in HIV testing were not sustained over time.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    New microfluidic blood-draw device could replace needle sticks and venipunctures at medical laboratories (DARK Daily)
Side effects may lead breast cancer patients to skip drugs (Reuters)
Scientists say they've grown the world's most complete petri dish brain (The Washington Post)
Study: Results of genetic testing for 22 genetic causes of neonatal diabetes (University of Exeter via News-Medical.Net)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 



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