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Home   About   Scholarships   Meetings   Publications   Resources   Sep. 3, 2013

 



Scientists grow mini brains from stem cells
CNN
Researchers have taken another important step forward by growing mini brains from programmable stem cells. They're not actually functioning brains — in the same way that a car with the engine on its roof or wheels on its hood isn't a drivable vehicle – but the parts are there, and that's an important scientific advancement, according to Juergen Knoblich, senior author of a new study on using stem cells to grow brain tissue.
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Disturbing thyroid cancer rise in Fukushima minors
RT
Six minors in Fukushima Prefecture who were 18 or younger at the time of the March 2011 nuclear disaster have been diagnosed with thyroid cancer since June. Ten other children are believed to have developed the same form of cancer in that time period.
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Measles outbreak rises from Texas pulpit, spreads across counties
PhysBizTech
An outbreak of measles in and around Texas' Tarrant and Denton counties — which has thus far affected 21 people — is expected to go from church to state before its spread comes to a close. Although 138 cases of measles have already been reported this year, the latest and most considerable surge has emerged from a Lone Star megachurch, Eagle Mountain International Church, where vaccination has been questioned and contested.
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Stopping cancer in its tracks?
North Carolina State University via Medical Xpress
We've come a long way in cancer treatments — we have powerful, effective drugs for many types of cancer and we're moving toward ever more specific, less invasive therapies. But the problem with cancer is that it's always in motion, metastasizing and spreading throughout the body to overwhelm it. What if you could stop cancer in its tracks?
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Are girls who drink at higher breast cancer risk?
Journal of the National Cancer Institute via MedPage Today
Women who consumed alcohol between their first period and first pregnancy were at increased risk for breast cancer and proliferative benign breast disease, researchers found. Compared with nondrinkers, those who drank between menarche and first pregnancy were younger, had an older age at first pregnancy, and were more likely to have a first-degree family history of breast cancer.
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Rotavirus vaccine benefits extend beyond immediate targets
Medscape Medical News
The incidence of severe gastroenteritis has declined significantly among children younger than 5 years since the rotavirus vaccine was introduced in 2006. Data now show that older age groups have also had significant reductions of severe gastroenteritis, suggesting the vaccine's benefits extend beyond its original recipients.
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Marie Curie was never my role model
By Heather Claxton-Douglas
In the latest attempt to get young girls interested in science, the European Union, as part of their Science: It's a Girl Thing! campaign, produced a commercial peppered with long-legged models, fashion runways, makeup, a hip-hop dance background, and not a single girl doing actual science. Not surprisingly, the commercial was deemed sexist and banned with calls to "show real women scientists, like Marie Curie." This response made me pause. I didn't pursue a career in science simply because "other women were doing it" — or did I?
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New therapy strategy for breast cancer that has spread to the brain
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Cellular therapy and gene therapy have been successfully combined in a mouse model to develop a viable treatment strategy for breast cancer that has spread to a patient's brain. Managing metastasis is difficult for several reasons: The circulatory network known as the blood-brain barrier prevents many anticancer drugs from reaching areas of the brain to which cancer has spread, and metastases have a tendency to spring up in multiple brain locations simultaneously, making current treatments such as radiation challenging.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Climate change impacting spread of infectious diseases (Infection Control Today)
Study: New boost for immune system against tumors (Medical News Today)
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Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Organ transplantation: Special consideration for kids
By Dorothy L. Tengler
Nearly 120,000 men, women and children currently need life-saving organ transplants. Every 10 minutes another name is added to the national organ transplant waiting list. As of March, 1,760 of these patients were pediatric. But just how long do children have to wait, and how is the process different for them than for adults? New ethical questions have been raised, surrounding the recent lung transplantation case of 10-year old girl Sarah Murnaghan from Pennsylvania.
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Industry Pulse: Do you think the current lung transplant system amounts to age discrimination?
ANSWER NOW


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Scientists grow mini brains from stem cells
CNN
Researchers have taken another important step forward by growing mini brains from programmable stem cells. They're not actually functioning brains but the parts are there, and that's an important scientific advancement, according to Juergen Knoblich, senior author of a new study on using stem cells to grow brain tissue.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Lyme disease figures soar, mostly in Northeast
The Boston Globe
New estimates indicate that Lyme disease is 10 times more common than previous national counts showed, the federal government announced recently, with about 300,000 people getting the disease each year — most in the Northeast. Lyme is now about as prevalent in the United States as reported cases of gonorrhea.

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CDC-supplied drug helps save kids from brain-eating amoeba
Medscape Medical News
Two children appear to be recovering from a usually deadly infection caused by the "brain-eating amoeba" with the help of an experimental antibiotic supplied by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC announced that it is making the antibiotic miltefosine available to treat cases of primary amebic meningoencephalitis.

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Randomized treatments may be more effective at stopping disease outbreaks
Scientific American
A bit of randomness in treatment schedules may actually help manage a disease outbreak. This conclusion comes from an analysis of treatment options in infectious disease outbreaks through the lens of complexity theory, which attempts to make sense of systems that are fundamentally unpredictable.
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How the gut microbiome influences health
Time
The bacteria in our gut already plays an important role in digestion. But new studies indicate that our bacteria could play a major role in whether or not we become obese.
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Breast cancer: 20 ways to help cut down the risk
The Daily Mirror
Around 1 in 8 women will develop breast ­cancer at some point in their lifetime. But there is no single cause, explains Lester Barr, breast cancer surgeon and chairman of Genesis Breast Cancer Prevention. But women can reduce their risk with a healthier lifestyle.
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