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Home   About   Scholarships   Meetings   Publications   Resources   Sep. 17, 2013

 



Vaccine 'clears HIV-like virus' in monkeys
BBC News
A vaccine for the monkey equivalent of HIV appears to eradicate the virus, a study suggests. Research published in the journal Nature has shown that vaccinated monkeys can clear Simian Immunodeficiency Virus infection from their bodies. It was effective in nine of the 16 monkeys that were inoculated.
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Challenging cases in hematology — Register for Oct.10 ASCLS/APHL webinar
American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
This one-hour webinar will utilize a case study format to present challenging and unusual morphologic hematology cases. For more information and to register your site, go to www.ascls.org/webinars. ASCLS members register at a discount with code FDC13.
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Deadly fungal disease detected outside the Pacific Northwest
NBC News
A rare fungus found in soil and trees has sickened hundreds of people in British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest in the last decade — and killed dozens — but scientists now say they're seeing different strains of the potentially deadly bug in additional U.S. states. At least 25 cases of Cryptococcus gatti, a fungus once confined to tropical climates, have been detected in eight states outside of the Northwest since 2009 — and six of those patients died, according to a new report in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  CellaVision Automates and Standardizes the Manual Differential

CellaVision introduces CellAtlas®, the perfect way to learn the basics of hematology cell morphology. This App for the Apple iPhone and iPod Touch compliments our digital cell morphology portfolio, and is an educational tool to assist in the recognition and classification of blood cells, by utilizing mini-lectures and cell quizzes. More
 


Experts: US cancer care in crisis
NBC News
Cancer may be the most feared diagnosis, but Americans are getting disorganized care and they're often not even getting treatment based on the best scientific evidence, a panel of experts reports. It's often too expensive, and the most privileged are getting far better care than people with lower income, minorities, people who live away from big cities and the elderly.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword CANCER CARE


New hope for ovarian cancer
By Dorothy L. Tengler
Despite advances in treatment, ovarian cancer remains a highly lethal disease, mainly because most women with ovarian cancer are diagnosed when the disease is at a late stage. When ovarian cancer is found in its early stages, treatment is most effective. A new way of screening for ovarian cancer appears to detect the disease in early stages. If confirmed in clinical trials, the test could become a routine screening for women.
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Industry Pulse: Do these findings suggest that using longitudinal screening strategy may be beneficial?
ANSWER NOW




Prehospital aspiration raises pneumonia risk
Infectious Disease Special Edition
One of the deadliest types of hospital-acquired infections in adult trauma patients is set in motion long before patients arrive at the hospital, according to a study reported at the 2013 meeting of the Surgical Infection Society. A study involving surgeons and paramedics showed that trauma patients who aspirate before they get to the hospital have a fourfold increased risk for developing healthcare–associated pneumonia and a more than threefold increased risk for ventilator-associated pneumonia.
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Study: Taking tablet after breast cancer surgery will keep the cancer away
Counsel & Heal
In a new study, researchers looked at the risk of relapse for breast cancer survivors and found that if people who underwent surgery for breast cancer did not take their prescribed hormone tablets every day post-surgery, they become three times more likely to get the cancer again.
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  PRODUCT SHOWCASES
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HIV patients with cancer pose treatment challenge
MedPage Today
HIV patients with cancer should avoid antiretroviral therapy based on protease inhibitors if possible, a researcher said. In a retrospective analysis, patients on a PI-based regimen had more side effects and were less likely to maintain anti-HIV efficacy six months after diagnosis. On the other hand, patients taking a regimen based on either an integrase inhibitor or and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor had fewer adverse events and better efficacy.
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C difficile infections rising, deaths leveling off
Medscape Medical News
Rates of Clostridium difficile infection nearly doubled in a decade in U.S. hospitals, results of a new survey show. The diarrhea-causing bacteria, which often occur as a complication of treatment with antibiotics, affected about 2.2 million people during a 10-year period. These data are "the first I'm aware of to look at trends in mortality and length of hospital stay among patients with CDI," said Kelly Daniels, a graduate student at the University of Texas at Austin.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Cancer gene sequencing raises new medical ethics issues (Medscape Medical News)
When cost-cutting in the clinical lab collides with effective QA/QC (Dark Daily)
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Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Deadly amoeba found for 1st time in municipal water supply
NPR via Minnesota Public Radio
A 4-year-old child who died of a rare brain infection has led Louisiana health officials to discover that the cause is lurking in the water pipes of St. Bernard Parish, southeast of New Orleans. It's a type of single-celled amoeba called Naegleria fowleri, about a tenth the width of a human hair. Some call it a "brain-eating" amoeba, although it does its damage by causing a devastating immune reaction rather than by actually devouring brain tissue.
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Vaccine 'clears HIV-like virus' in monkeys
BBC News
A vaccine for the monkey equivalent of HIV appears to eradicate the virus, a study suggests. Research published in the journal Nature has shown that vaccinated monkeys can clear Simian Immunodeficiency Virus infection from their bodies.

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read more
Cancer gene sequencing raises new medical ethics issues
Medscape Medical News
Cancer researchers are routinely analyzing hundreds of individual cancer genomes in the quest for better, more personalized treatment. As a byproduct of this work, new genetic sequencing methods are identifying medically important genomic variants not related to the cancer under study.

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CDC-supplied drug helps save kids from brain-eating amoeba
Medscape Medical News
Two children appear to be recovering from a usually deadly infection caused by the "brain-eating amoeba" with the help of an experimental antibiotic supplied by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Researchers use Pap test to detect ovarian and endometrial cancers
ADVANCE
Using a highly accepted and widely used Pap test for more than HPV screening may be the diagnostic equivalent of "more bang for the buck." That sort of helpful screening blast may be what researchers at Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center discovered when they used cervical fluid obtained during routine Pap tests to run a parallel test for ovarian and endometrial cancers.
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Advances in blood stem cell biology
Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute via HealthCanal
Researchers from the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute have proven that protein PARP2 plays a key role in maintaining the integrity of the genome of blood stem cells, also known as haematopoietic cells. These results may prove useful to design new drugs and to improve therapeutic strategies based on radiotherapy and chemotherapy.
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