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CDC sets threat levels for drug-resistant 'superbugs'
CNN
Health officials have been warning us about antibiotic overuse and drug-resistant "superbugs" for a long time. But recently the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is sounding the alarm in a new way. For the first time, the CDC is categorizing drug-resistant superbugs by threat level. That's because, in their conservative estimates, more than 2 million people get antibiotic-resistant infections each year, and at least 23,000 die because current drugs no longer stop their infections.
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Free ASCLS webcast available
American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
Free ASCLS webcast! The Molecular Profile of Hematologic Malignancies: DNA to Diagnosis — Thursday, Oct. 3. Broadcast at two times: Noon ET/11 a.m. CT/10 a.m. MT/9 a.m. PT and 8 p.m. ET/7 p.m. CT/6 p.m. MT/5 p.m. PT. No registration required! Go to www.ascls.org/ascls-webcast for more information.
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New test rapidly distinguishes viral, bacterial infections
Medscape Medical News
A new test that analyzes patients' immune responses, rather than the pathogens themselves, can rapidly distinguish viral infections from bacterial infections, according to an article published in a recent issue of Science Translational Medicine. If carried into clinical use after further evaluation, the assay could help physicians better decide which patients need antibiotics and avoid inappropriate prescribing of antibiotics to patients who will not benefit.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  CellaVision Automates and Standardizes the Manual Differential

CellaVision introduces CellAtlas®, the perfect way to learn the basics of hematology cell morphology. This App for the Apple iPhone and iPod Touch compliments our digital cell morphology portfolio, and is an educational tool to assist in the recognition and classification of blood cells, by utilizing mini-lectures and cell quizzes. More
 


The quest for a Lyme vaccine
The New York Times
People who spend time outdoors in wooded or grassy areas where black-legged ticks are abundant would welcome a vaccine to protect them from Lyme disease and other dangerous pathogens that the same ticks can transmit simultaneously. Past efforts to develop and market a Lyme vaccine ended in failure, but now there are glimmers of hope that newer, more broadly effective vaccines can be developed.
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Advance seen in turning adult cells into stem cells
HealthDay News
Scientists have figured out a way to more readily turn adult skin cells into primitive stem cells that could potentially be used to treat a variety of chronic diseases. In a study published in Nature, Israeli researchers reported that they identified the key molecule that stops adult cells from transforming into so-called induced pluripotent stem cells.
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New test can help detect breast cancer a decade before it develops
Fox News
Imagine being able to detect breast cancer a decade before it develops. Doctors are saying that dream may soon become a reality with a new test called ForeCYTE, which gets cells from the ducts of the breast.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword RADIATION


At 10 years, partial, whole radiation equal in breast cancer
Medscape Medical News
In a study of women with early breast cancer, outcomes with accelerated partial-breast irradiation and traditional whole-breast irradiation were comparable at 10 years. The women received the radiotherapy after lumpectomy.
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  PRODUCT SHOWCASES
Bio-Rad Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Controls

So many factors impact the measurement of therapeutic drug levels requiring you to depend greatly on quality control products to monitor the analytical performance of your drug testing procedures. New LiquichekTM Whole Blood Immunosuppressant control with Everolimus is suitable for immunoassay and chromatographic methods.

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Could immune cell discovery lead to universal flu vaccine?
HealthDay News
An experiment based on the 2009 H1N1 swine flu pandemic may have helped scientists move closer to developing a universal flu vaccine, according to a new study. Researchers at Imperial College London, in England, asked 342 staff members and students to donate blood samples right as the pandemic was beginning in autumn 2009. They were also asked to report any symptoms they experienced over the next two flu seasons.
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Agreement on use of information from 61-year-old cervical cancer cells sets new ethical privacy standards
Dark Daily
Patient privacy rights involving genetic information has gone to a new level. Pathologists and clinical laboratory managers will want to understand the legal precedents and new standards established in an unprecedented agreement between the family of a woman who died in 1951 and the growing research establishment studying her cervical cancer cells following her death.
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Colon cancer screenings work, twin studies report
HealthDay News
People are less likely to die from colon cancer if they use any of the currently recommended screening procedures, a pair of new long-term studies reveal. Colonoscopy remains the most effective screening tool, reducing the risk of colon cancer death by 56 percent, according to new data published in a recent issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    New hope for ovarian cancer (Dorothy L. Tengler)
Deadly fungal disease detected outside the Pacific Northwest (NBC News)
Deadly amoeba found for 1st time in municipal water supply (NPR via Minnesota Public Radio)
Study: Taking tablet after breast cancer surgery will keep the cancer away (Counsel & Heal)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Research brings a DNA double take
The New York Times
Not long ago, researchers had thought it was rare for the cells in a single healthy person to differ genetically in a significant way. But scientists are finding that it's quite common for an individual to have multiple genomes.
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Genomic differences in types of cervical cancer may affect treatment choices
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Marked differences in the genomic terrain of the two most common types of cervical cancer suggest that patients might benefit from therapies geared to each type's molecular idiosyncrasies, according to a new study. The new study, conducted by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, is the first to compare the spectrum of cancer-related gene mutations in the two main subtypes of cervical cancer, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
CDC sets threat levels for drug-resistant 'superbugs'
CNN
Recently the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is sounding the alarm in a new way. For the first time, the CDC is categorizing drug-resistant superbugs by threat level.

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read more
New hope for ovarian cancer
By Dorothy L. Tengler
A new way of screening for ovarian cancer appears to detect the disease in early stages. If confirmed in clinical trials, the test could become a routine screening for women.

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When cost-cutting in the clinical lab collides with effective QA/QC
Dark Daily
When does budget cutting in a clinical laboratory begin to undermine the accuracy and analytical integrity of the medical laboratory test results produced by the laboratory?

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Officials: Oklahoma dentist spread hepatitis C
ABC News
VideoBrief A Tulsa, Okla.-area dentist accused of using rusty equipment and dirty needles is responsible for the country's first known outbreak of hepatitis C among dental patients, health officials said. Dr. W. Scott Harrington's practice was shut down in March 2013 after a surprise inspection revealed major lapses in sterility practices. At least 89 of Harrington's patients have since tested positive for hepatitis C.
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Deadly MERS still a mystery after a year
The Canadian Press via The Montreal Gazette
It's been a year since the world learned that a cousin of the SARS virus had burst out of some hiding spot in nature to infect and kill a man in Saudi Arabia. Since then, the world has learned of roughly 130 MERS cases, 57 of them fatal. But in contrast to the SARS outbreak, at this point relatively little is known about MERS.
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Infectious disease: A preventable tragedy
The Huffington Post
Lack of access to water for handwashing and sanitation is why infections with intestinal worms, also known as soil transmitted helminthes, affect nearly 25 percent of the people on this planet. It's why STH infection is considered a major public health issue in more than 120 countries around the world.
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