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Scientists explain how rabies 'hijacks' neurons to attack the brain
Tel Aviv University via Infection Control Today
Rabies causes acute inflammation of the brain, producing psychosis and violent aggression. The virus, which paralyzes the body's internal organs, is always deadly for those unable to obtain vaccines in time. Some 55,000 people die from rabies every year. For the first time, Tel Aviv University scientists have discovered the exact mechanism this killer virus uses to efficiently enter the central nervous system, where it erupts in a toxic explosion of symptoms.
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Scientists identify rare stem cells in testis that hold potential for infertility treatments
HealthCanal
Rare stem cells in testis that produce a biomarker protein called PAX7 help give rise to new sperm cells — and may hold a key to restoring fertility, research by scientists at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center suggests. Researchers studying infertility in mouse models found that, unlike similar types of cells that develop into sperm, the stem cells that express PAX7 can survive treatment with toxic drugs and radiation. If the findings hold true in people, they eventually could lead to new strategies to restore or protect fertility in men undergoing cancer treatment.
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Scientists identify more than 400 genes that influence height
Medical News Today
In what is the largest genome-wide association study so far, an international research team has found more than 400 genes that influence height — nearly doubling the number of height-related genes identified in previous research. The researchers say their findings, reached by analyzing genome-wide data from more than 250,000 people, can explain around 20 percent of height heritability in humans, increasing from 12 percent prior to this study.
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Multiple sclerosis researchers find the effects of age on remyelination are reversible
University of Cambridge via Medical Xpress
Like conducting an errant orchestra to play together, researchers are guiding processes that go awry in multiple sclerosis to repair themselves. The conductor walks to the stand and takes his place in front of the orchestra. He raises his baton and, with a dramatic flourish, 100 individuals come to life. From nowhere, the stillness becomes a beautiful harmony as each member takes their part in a complex symphony.
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Embryonic stem cells to tackle major killer diseases
New Scientist
Stem cells are getting serious. Two decades after they were discovered, human embryonic stem cells are being tested as a treatment for two major diseases: heart failure and Type 1 diabetes. Treatments based on hESCs have been slow coming because of controversy over their source and fears that they could turn into tumors once implanted.
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2nd baby 'cured' of HIV suffers relapse
HealthDay News
An Italian toddler thought cured of HIV with early aggressive treatment following birth has suffered a relapse, his doctors report. The 3-year-old child's viral levels of HIV rebounded after doctors took him off antiretroviral medications, according to a case report published Oct. 4 in The Lancet.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Differentiating chikungunya from dengue: A clinical challenge (Medscape)
In search of a cure for HIV: Researchers replicate treatment of the 1 man cured of HIV (Medical Daily)
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Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


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What next for the Ebola outbreak? Here's what the math says
The Huffington Post
VideoBriefEveryone's talking about Ebola — and no wonder, now that the deadly disease has been diagnosed in the U.S. for the first time ever. Will the mini-outbreak in Dallas be contained, as public health officials keep reassuring us? Or are we on the cusp of a major epidemic here at home?
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Controlling Ebola in communities is critical factor in containing outbreaks
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine via ScienceDaily
Reducing community transmission and changing behavior in communities is key to containing Ebola outbreaks, according to new research into the first known outbreak of the virus in 1976.
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TRENDING ARTICLE
Scientists explain how rabies 'hijacks' neurons to attack the brain
Tel Aviv University via Infection Control Today
Rabies causes acute inflammation of the brain, producing psychosis and violent aggression. The virus, which paralyzes the body's internal organs, is always deadly for those unable to obtain vaccines in time. Some 55,000 people die from rabies every year. For the first time, Tel Aviv University scientists have discovered the exact mechanism this killer virus uses to efficiently enter the central nervous system, where it erupts in a toxic explosion of symptoms.

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Differentiating chikungunya from dengue: A clinical challenge
Medscape
In May of this year, a woman in her early 30s visited an outpatient clinic in Missouri, reporting a three-day history of fever, myalgia and arthralgia. She described recent travel to Haiti for a one-week missionary trip and indicated that her illness began three days after her return. Serologic diagnostic testing for dengue and chikungunya were requested, and the patient was prescribed bed rest and acetaminophen for pain.

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A frightening curve: How fast is the Ebola outbreak growing?
NPR
Researchers at Columbia University developed a model to forecast how the current Ebola epidemic might continue through mid-October, based on the infection rates as of Sept. 7. The "no change" forecast assumes that current efforts at stopping the virus will continue at the same rate of effectiveness. The "improved" forecast assumes that interventions will become more effective.

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Most clinical laboratories and pathology groups are under pressure to cut costs and deal with shrinking budgets for 2015
DARK Daily
By any measure, this year's budget season is a tough one for the nation's clinical laboratories and pathology groups. Most laboratories are scrambling to adjust to reduced reimbursement and directives from their parent hospitals and health systems to shrink their laboratory budgets for 2015. It's why smart cost-cutting tops the list of challenges for all medical laboratory managers and pathologists.
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Scientists develop barcoding tools for stem cells
Harvard University via R&D Magazine
A 7-year-project to develop a barcoding and tracking system for tissue stem cells has revealed previously unrecognized features of normal blood production: New data from Harvard Stem Cell Institute scientists at Boston Children's Hospital suggests, surprisingly, that the billions of blood cells that we produce each day are made not by blood stem cells, but rather their less pluripotent descendants, called progenitor cells.
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