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Home   About   Scholarships   Meetings   Publications   Resources   Oct. 8, 2013


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What Facebook and Twitter reveal about contagion
Time
All that chatter on social media may be more valuable than we think, say researchers who are mining the postings for clues about how to best control infectious disease. According to the researchers, who reported their findings in the journal Science, applying mathematical models to what people are talking about on Facebook and Twitter could help scientists to better understand how contagious diseases spread, and how people react to outbreaks.
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Challenging Cases in Hematology — Register for the Oct. 10 ASCLS/APHL webinar
American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
This one-hour webinar will utilize a case study format to present challenging and unusual morphologic hematology cases. For more information and to register your site, go to www.ascls.org/webinars. ASCLS members register at a discount with code FDC13.
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Order Presentations for ACO, Massive Transfusion Protocol, HAI topics and more!

It's not too late to purchase the Annual Meeting session recordings! Listen in on the sessions you were unable to attend and share the conference with your colleagues. The session recordings are in MP4 video format — presentations are synchronized audio and PowerPoint presentations. P.A.C.E.® credit available through Jan. 31, 2014. Purchase full access or individual sessions — download or on CD. Click here to order online.
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CellaVision introduces CellAtlas®, the perfect way to learn the basics of hematology cell morphology. This App for the Apple iPhone and iPod Touch compliments our digital cell morphology portfolio, and is an educational tool to assist in the recognition and classification of blood cells, by utilizing mini-lectures and cell quizzes. More
 


Work on cell 'ferrying' system and disease triggers wins Nobel prize
Reuters
Two Americans and a German won the 2013 Nobel medicine prize for their work on how hormones and enzymes are transported within and outside cells, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. James Rothman, Randy Schekman and Germany's Thomas Suedhof mapped out one of the body's critical networks that uses tiny bubbles known as vesicles to ferry chemicals such as insulin within cells.
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6 ways the government shutdown will impact science and health
Scientific American
The clock ran out for the U.S. Congress to agree on a budget bill and avoid a federal government shutdown. In addition to furloughs keeping thousands of government workers from their jobs, the shutdown will have wide consequences for the country's science, innovation and health. From a panda cam gone dark and national park visitors getting the boot to a halt on the government's flu program, here's a look at six ways the shutdown will impact science.
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Study: ICU gloves and gowns might reduce MRSA infection
HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report
Requiring healthcare workers to wear gloves and gowns for all contact with intensive care unit patients reduces the risk of one type of antibiotic-resistant infection, but not another, a new study shows. Researchers focused on two main types of antibiotic-resistant infections that affect patients in hospitals and other healthcare facilities: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus.
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Study: Norovirus vaccine works on common strain
Medscape Medical News
An investigational vaccine being developed by Takeda Pharmaceutical Company is effective against the most common strains of norovirus, a new study shows. Vaccinated people were half as likely to suffer severe symptoms compared with those not vaccinated who swallowed water laced with strains of the virus, said lead investigator David Bernstein, M.D., from the University of Cincinnati, in Ohio.
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New Affordable LED Lighting System

Bridging the gap between costly color-specific LED lighting and lower-cost conventional fluorescent lighting, Percival Scientific, Inc. has introduced the LED-Elite Series. These research chambers feature a multicolor LED lamp providing the correct spectral quality at the correct irradiance with exceptional environmental control every time. A webinar explaining the features and benefits is available at www.percival-scientific.com


Report: Holy water contaminated with human waste
Reuters via The Guardian
Holy water at religious shrines and churches in Austria is often contaminated with fecal matter and bacteria, researchers have found, advising the faithful not to drink it, especially in hospital chapels. Scientists at Vienna University medical school's institute of hygiene and applied immunology came to the conclusion after analyzing the water quality at 21 "holy" springs and 18 fonts at churches and chapels at various times of year.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword FECAL MATTER


New study: Poop pills are latest way to cure dangerous C. diff infections
NBC News
Swallowing a handful of feces-filled pills might not sound like a medical breakthrough, but for some patients, the unconventional new treatment has been nothing less than a cure. Canadian authors of a new study report the first formal success of fecal transplant pills aimed at treating severe recurrent C. diff infections, which U.S. health officials recently named one of the top three antibiotic-related threats in the nation.
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Why is no one on the first treatment to prevent HIV?
The New Yorker
According to Dawn Smith, a biomedical interventions implementation officer in the Centers for Disease Control's epidemiology branch, at least half a million Americans are good candidates for pre-exposure prophylaxis — meaning that they are at high risk for contracting HIV through sexual activity — yet only a few thousand Americans are receiving the treatment, which could reduce the risk of contracting HIV by more than 90 percent.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Report: HIV infections have fallen by a third since 2001s (Bloomberg Businessweek)
Specific sugar molecule causes growth of cancer cells (Oncology Nurse Advisor)
High-tech lab in Kazakhstan to fight plague outbreaks (National Geographic)
'Facts' of C. diff transmission challenged (MedPage Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Daily walk may cut breast cancer risk
HealthDay News
Older women who walk every day may reduce their risk of developing breast cancer. And those who exercise vigorously may get even more protection, according to new research. The study of more than 73,000 postmenopausal women found that walking at a moderate pace for an hour a day was associated with a 14 percent reduced breast cancer risk, compared to leading a sedentary lifestyle.
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Let's talk about stress
By Jeff White
When was the last time you were in a stressful situation? Last week? Last month? Today? Many of us have experienced some level of stress in the not too distant past, and will probably experience more in the near future. Whatever the cause of your stress, it can be detrimental to your health in many ways. So how do you cope with stress? There are many ways to deal with it — some good, some bad.
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Vaccine refusal contributed to 2010 whooping cough spread
UPI
Vaccine refusal contributed to the 2010 whooping cough spread of more than 9,000 cases in California, U.S. researchers said. Jessica E. Atwell of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, Josh Van Otterloo of Emory University School of Public Health in Atlanta and Jennifer Zipprich of the California Department of Public Health said the 2010 outbreak of pertussis, or whooping cough, of 9,120 cases was the largest whooping cough outbreak since 1947.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
What Facebook and Twitter reveal about contagion
Time
According to the researchers, who reported their findings in the journal Science, applying mathematical models to what people are talking about on Facebook and Twitter could help scientists to better understand how contagious diseases spread, and how people react to outbreaks.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Report: HIV infections have fallen by a third since 2001
Bloomberg Businessweek
Worldwide, 2.3 million people were newly infected with the AIDS-causing virus last year, compared with 3.4 million in 2001, the Joint UN Program on HIV/AIDS, or UNAIDS, wrote in a report.

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New test rapidly distinguishes viral, bacterial infections
Medscape Medical News
A new test that analyzes patients' immune responses, rather than the pathogens themselves, can rapidly distinguish viral infections from bacterial infections, according to an article published in a recent issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Hospitalized HIV patients benefit from seeing infectious diseases specialists
Infection Control Today
When patients with HIV are hospitalized for other conditions, such as a heart problem, surgery or complications of diabetes, mistakes are often made involving their complicated anti-retroviral therapy regimens. But those errors are more than twice as likely to be corrected when patients are seen by an infectious diseases physician, suggests a Cleveland Clinic study.
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Diabetes tests often not being ordered or used properly
Medscape Medical News
Of the less than 20 percent of patients with diabetes who meet the nationally recommended frequency for glycated hemoglobin testing, more than a third are not prescribed treatment changes when their levels increase significantly, a new study has found.
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