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Enhanced Integration for YOUR Clinical Laboratory


The MassTrak Online SPE Analyzer utilizes advanced fluidics and a solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridge technology to seamlessly integrate SPE with LC/MS analysis in a single platform.

 



How technology has evolved to aid breast cancer screening
Computing
It has been a long journey for researchers and doctors to deliver better tests that can catch breast cancer in its infancy, enabling women to be diagnosed at an earlier stage, which improves their chances of survival. It is in this space that technology has played a big part, scientist Mark Kane Goldstein recently said.
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Free ASCLS webcast! Challenges in Implementing a Massive Transfusion Protocol — Thursday, Nov. 7
American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
Broadcast at two times: Noon ET/11 a.m. CT/10 a.m. MT/9 a.m. PT and 8 p.m. ET/7 p.m. CT/6 p.m. MT/5 p.m. PT. No registration required! Go to www.ascls.org/ascls-webcast for more information. Sponsored by Bio-Rad Laboratories.
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Federal Government and Health Care Reform Update — Register for the Nov. 14 ASCLS-APHL webinar
American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
In this one-hour webinar you will learn the latest about the impact of regulations, proficiency testing, reimbursement and healthcare reform on the laboratory profession. For more information and to register your site, go to www.ascls.org/webinars. ASCLS members register at a discount with code FDC13.
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1 dose of HPV vaccine may be enough
MedPage Today
A single dose of human papillomavirus vaccine achieved stable antibody levels at 48 months, suggesting that one dose of vaccine might afford adequate protection, according to a study from Central America. One or two doses of vaccine produced lower geometric mean titers as compared with three doses, but the magnitude and durability of the antibody responses warrant further study, Mahboobeh Safaeian, Ph.D., of the National Cancer Institute, and colleagues reported online in Cancer Prevention Research.
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New look at old test may provide earlier detection of meningitis, researchers find
University of Missouri Health System
Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have found a more accurate method to screen for bacterial meningococcal infection in its early stages, when it's hardest to detect. According to the researchers, the method for diagnosis could save lives by getting patients treatment earlier, when the infection is most treatable.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  CellaVision Automates and Standardizes the Manual Differential

CellaVision introduces CellAtlas®, the perfect way to learn the basics of hematology cell morphology. This App for the Apple iPhone and iPod Touch compliments our digital cell morphology portfolio, and is an educational tool to assist in the recognition and classification of blood cells, by utilizing mini-lectures and cell quizzes. More
 


Abnormal anal cytology found in half of HIV-positive gay men
Medscape Medical News
Anal dysplasia is frequent in HIV-positive men who have sex with men. Longer sustained control of HIV is associated with less high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia, according to a recent study.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword HIV


Cutting edge: What's new in pharmaceutical R&D
By Rosemary Sparacio
It is clear that pharmaceutical companies are tackling serious diseases in therapeutic areas that heretofore were more challenging. But new technology has changed that landscape forever. And patients with diseases like cystic fibrosis, cancer, celiac disease and Crohn's disease — just to name a few — now have a wide variety of drugs to look forward to in the near future. Many pharmaceutical companies are forming alliances with significant monetary investments to improve both their product lines and their bottom lines.
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From diagnosis to treatment, has lung cancer begun to turn the corner?
Forbes
Lung cancer is difficult to diagnose and challenging to treat, but recent strides in genetic testing and therapeutic options have begun, slowly, to turn the tide. Certain cell lung cancers can be identified and can be treated with therapies that offer patients significant improvements in outcomes, and while long-term survival is still elusive, for some patients, months have become years.
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Analyzing hundreds of cells in a few mouse clicks
Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne via R&D Magazine
VideoBriefThe increasingly powerful microscopes used in biomedical imaging provide biologists with 3-D images of hundreds of cells, and cells in these images are often layered on each other. Under these conditions, it is impossible for traditional computational methods to determine the cells' properties (i.e., their size, shape and density) quickly. Ricard Delgado-Gonzalo's work at EPFL is about to change that.
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New Affordable LED Lighting System

Bridging the gap between costly color-specific LED lighting and lower-cost conventional fluorescent lighting, Percival Scientific, Inc. has introduced the LED-Elite Series. These research chambers feature a multicolor LED lamp providing the correct spectral quality at the correct irradiance with exceptional environmental control every time. A webinar explaining the features and benefits is available at www.percival-scientific.com


Research: Link between gene mutation, resistance to estrogen cancer therapy
Medical Xpress
Two teams of researchers, both made up of members from a wide variety of research institutions in the U.S. have independently come up with the same findings: a gene mutation in ESR1 (a gene that encodes estrogen receptors) may be linked to resistance to estrogen therapies given to women to treat breast cancer. In their papers, both published in the journal Nature Genetics, the two teams describe their research and findings and how what they've found might help lead to new ways to treat breast cancer in the near future.
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Breakthroughs in animal healthcare may hold treatments for humans
NBC News
While human doctors and veterinarians are usually thought to keep to their own corners of the animal kingdom, more are seeing the same maladies in their patients — from breast cancers to addictions to eating disorders — causing the two disciplines to increasingly team up to crack medical mysteries.
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Researchers discover how cancer 'invisibility cloak' works
National Jewish Health via Medical Xpress
Researchers at National Jewish Health have discovered how a lipid secreted by cancer tumors prevents the immune system from mounting an immune response against it. When lysophosphatidic acid binds to killer T cells, it acts almost like an "invisibility cloak," preventing T cells from recognizing and attacking nascent tumors.
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Prostate tops list of most inheritable cancers
Medscape Medical News
One legacy that most men could do without is an inherited risk for prostate cancer, but a massive cohort study shows that for some men, genetic history hints at oncologic destiny. The estimated heritability of prostate cancer — the degree to which genes contribute to risk — was 58 percent, which is the highest for any malignancy studied, said Dr. Jaakko Kaprio, professor of genetic epidemiology at the University of Helsinki.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Study finds reservoir of hidden HIV bigger than once thought (Fox News)
How societal, economic factors play into rise of drug-resistant bacteria (PBS)
Latest automation techniques in immunohematology testing (By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani)
Many tests to diagnose Lyme disease, but no proof they work (The Boston Globe)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Even healthy kids can die from flu complications
USA Today
A new report underscores what health professionals know but parents may not: The flu can be fatal to children, even healthy kids who don't have other medical conditions. Researchers with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that 830 kids died from flu-related complications between October 2004, and September 2012, and most of those children had not gotten a flu vaccine.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
How technology has evolved to aid breast cancer screening
Computing
It has been a long journey for researchers and doctors to deliver better tests that can catch breast cancer in its infancy, enabling women to be diagnosed at an earlier stage, which improves their chances of survival. It is in this space that technology has played a big part, scientist Mark Kane Goldstein recently said.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Study finds reservoir of hidden HIV bigger than once thought
Fox News
Over the past decade, scientists have made incredible strides in the field of HIV research. But a cure for the human immunodeficiency virus has still eluded scientists and now a new report from Howard Hughes Medical Institute has revealed that completely eradicating the virus may be much more difficult than previously thought.

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Why scientists held back details on a unique botulinum toxin
NPR via WABE-FM
Scientists have discovered the first new form of botulinum toxin in over 40 years, but they're taking the unusual step of keeping key details about it secret. That's because botulinum toxin is one of the most poisonous substances known.

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Students improve early detection of cancer and disease
Medical News Today
A group of students and faculty at Grand Valley State University have been working with Van Andel Institute to develop new methods to further a growing medical field that aims to improve early detection of cancer and disease. A group of four Grand Valley students and graduates, and Anthony Chang from VAI, presented three years' worth of research at the World Molecular Imaging Congress, one of the largest meetings in the medical imaging field, in Savannah, Ga.
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Global molecular diagnostics market reached a value of $4.8 billion during 2011
Trans World News
Molecular diagnostics, or MDx, is a new class of diagnostic tests that identify nucleic acids or proteins to test the status of a disease. MDx is the fastest-growing segment within the in-vitro diagnostic space, driven by accuracy, high sensitivity, fast turnaround time, easy workflow and cost-effective testing.
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