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Study: Too few with hepatitis C start or stick with treatment
HealthDay News
A new study suggests that only a quarter of people with hepatitis C are willing to start the standard treatment for the serious viral infection. When interferon injections — the current standard treatment — work, which only happens about 16 percent of the time, the risk of dying drops by 45 percent, the University of Southern California researchers said.
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Federal Government and Health Care Reform Update — Register for the Nov. 14 ASCLS-APHL webinar
American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
In this one-hour webinar you will learn the latest about the impact of regulations, proficiency testing, reimbursement and healthcare reform on the laboratory profession. For more information and to register your site, go to www.ascls.org/webinars. ASCLS members register at a discount with code FDC13.
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Download educational sessions — Update on New Oral Anticoagulants, ACOs, HAI and more!
American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
It's not too late to purchase the Annual Meeting session recordings for only $25 each! Listen in on the sessions you were unable to attend and share the conference with your colleagues. The session recordings are in MP4 Video Format — presentations are synchronized audio and PowerPoint presentations. P.A.C.E.® credit available through Jan. 31, 2014. Purchase full access or individual sessions — download or on CD. Click here to order online.
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Polio virus in Syria and Israel may endanger Europe
Medscape Medical News
Two infectious disease experts warn that a new polio outbreak in Syria caused by wild-type polio virus 1 and asymptomatic cases in Israel might endanger Europe and other neighboring regions, according to correspondence published online in the Lancet.
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Decoding breast cancer drug resistance
The Scientist
Estrogen is so intimately involved in breast cancer that drugs that disrupt the hormone's actions have become frontline treatments for the disease. These drugs have been incredibly successful, but for reasons that are still unclear, patients often develop resistance to them, especially when their tumors migrate, or metastasize, to other organs.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  CellaVision Automates and Standardizes the Manual Differential

CellaVision introduces CellAtlas®, the perfect way to learn the basics of hematology cell morphology. This App for the Apple iPhone and iPod Touch compliments our digital cell morphology portfolio, and is an educational tool to assist in the recognition and classification of blood cells, by utilizing mini-lectures and cell quizzes. More
 


New immunotherapy could be 'game changer' in NSCLC
Medscape Medical News
A new immunotherapy, MPDL3280A (under development by Genentech), has shown impressive results in a small group of patients with heavily pretreated nonsmall-cell lung cancer who were taking part in a phase 1 clinical trial. All but 1 of the 53 NSCLC patients responded, and the responses are "outstandingly durable," Jean-Charles Soria, M.D., from the Institut Gustave Roussy in Villejuif, France, said.
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HPV testing tops Pap for cancer prevention
MedPage Today
Testing for human papillomavirus led to significantly lower rates of invasive cervical cancer as compared with screening cytology, authors of a review of four randomized trials concluded. After 5 years of follow-up, women randomized to HPV screening had a cumulative incidence of invasive cervical cancer of 8.7 per 100,000 as compared with 36 per 100,000 among women randomized to screening cytology (Pap smear).
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CDC: This year a menu of options against influenza
United Press International
A flu shot can reduce the risk a person gets the flu, make the flu less severe if caught and help those who can't be vaccinated, a U.S. health official says. Anne Schuchat, assistant surgeon general of the U.S. Public Health Service and director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said there's a menu of vaccines this year.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword INFLUENZA


Congress opens door to allowing HIV organ donations
The Hill
The House this week will take a step toward ending a ban on organ donations from HIV-positive patients. As HIV patients live longer, many are in need of new organs, and some doctors say they would face a much shorter waiting period if organs from other HIV patients were available.
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New Affordable LED Lighting System

Bridging the gap between costly color-specific LED lighting and lower-cost conventional fluorescent lighting, Percival Scientific, Inc. has introduced the LED-Elite Series. These research chambers feature a multicolor LED lamp providing the correct spectral quality at the correct irradiance with exceptional environmental control every time. A webinar explaining the features and benefits is available at www.percival-scientific.com


Brain tumor drug separates cancer cells from healthy ones
Drug Discovery & Development
A potential new drug, already in clinical development, can stop brain tumor cells growing while leaving healthy cells alone, according to new research published in PLOS ONE. Cancer Research U.K. scientists from the Samantha Dickson Brain Cancer Unit, which is funded by The Brian Tumor Charity, at the UCL Cancer Institute in London focused on glioblastoma, the most common type of brain tumor.
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Changes ahead in reimbursement for pathology lab, direct-to-consumer testing
Dark Daily
In the American healthcare system today, the era of fee-for-service medicine will soon end. This development has huge implications for every clinical laboratory and anatomic pathology practice in the United States because fee-for-service is their primary source of revenue.
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Study: Don't ask, just tell parents when it's time for vaccines
HealthDay News
The way a doctor talks about vaccines can make a difference in whether or not parents resist shots for their child, new research suggests. Parents are much less likely to resist these immunizations, the study found, if a doctor uses language that presumes the parent will accept the vaccines, such as "We have to do some shots," instead of language that suggests that vaccinations need to be discussed and then decided on, such as "What do you want to do about shots?"
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    New look at old test may provide earlier detection of meningitis, researchers find (University of Missouri Health System)
Researchers discover how cancer 'invisibility cloak' works (National Jewish Health via Medical Xpress)
How technology has evolved to aid breast cancer screening (Computing)
Abnormal anal cytology found in half of HIV-positive gay men (Medscape Medical News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


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Holograms offer hope against malaria
R&D Magazine
Edinburgh scientists have developed a 3-D filming technique that could inform research to stem the spread of malaria. Creating moving digital holograms of malaria sperm has given researchers fresh insights into the behavior of these tiny life forms.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
Study: Too few with hepatitis C start or stick with treatment
HealthDay News
A new study suggests that only a quarter of people with hepatitis C are willing to start the standard treatment for the serious viral infection.

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New look at old test may provide earlier detection of meningitis, researchers find
University of Missouri Health System
Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have found a more accurate method to screen for bacterial meningococcal infection in its early stages, when it's hardest to detect.

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Study finds reservoir of hidden HIV bigger than once thought
Fox News
Over the past decade, scientists have made incredible strides in the field of HIV research. But a cure for the human immunodeficiency virus has still eluded scientists and now a new report from Howard Hughes Medical Institute has revealed that completely eradicating the virus may be much more difficult than previously thought.

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Molecular sequencing of C. difficile reveals unexpected routes of infection
Infectious Disease Special Edition
A study of the genetic diversity of Clostridium difficile has surprised researchers and shed new light on the way this pathogen may be transmitted between patients. "Unexpectedly few cases appear to be acquired from direct ward-based contact with other symptomatic cases," said study author David Eyre, a clinical researcher at the University of Oxford, England.
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On-air mammogram reveals breast cancer diagnosis for news correspondent
Mediabistro
ABC News correspondent Amy Robach will have a double mastectomy to treat breast cancer, she revealed on "Good Morning America." Robach, 40, was diagnosed after she had her first mammogram as part of ABC's Breast Cancer Awareness Month.
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