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Home   About   Scholarships   Meetings   Publications   Resources   Nov. 19, 2013


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New layer to the body's fight against infection identified
Infection Control Today
The layers of skin that form the first line of defense in the body's fight against infection have revealed an unanticipated secret. The single cell type that was thought to be behind the skin's immune defense has been found to have a doppelganger, with researchers from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute showing the cells, despite appearing identical, are actually two different types.
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American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
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Universities continue to lobby against sequester's cuts of research funding
The Washington Post
At many research universities, the deep federal budget cuts known as the sequester continue to cloud the future of laboratories and the scientists who staff them. University presidents meeting in the nation's capital denounced the sequester and urged Congress to roll it back so that federally sponsored research can resume at a normal pace.
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Stem cells may let transplant organs avoid rejection
The Boston Globe
A potential breakthrough is underway in Holliston, Mass., where a company called Harvard Apparatus Regenerative Technology is developing a system that dramatically reduces the risk of rejection and the need to suppress the immune system. The trick is that Harvard Apparatus infuses the transplant tissue with a patient's own stem cells before surgery, fooling the body into believing the new organ is actually its own.
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Global war urged on antibiotic resistance
MedPage Today
The battle against antibiotic resistance needs to go global, with sweeping changes to the way the medications are developed, financed, and used, according to an international group of infectious disease specialists. Writing online in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Otto Cars, M.D., of Uppsala University in Sweden, and colleagues argue that the time has come for worldwide, coordinated action to preserve antibiotic effectiveness.
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Steady progress in chemotherapy treatment for biliary tract cancer
By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani
Chemotherapy is widely used for the treatment of advanced biliary tract cancer, or BTC, but the treatment methods are not fully developed in comparison with other types of cancers such as lung and colorectal cancers. Combination therapy, including cytotoxic agents and molecular-targeted agents, has been widely evaluated for advanced BTC for first-line settings. Second-line chemotherapy is found to be more effective for advanced BTC. However, more clinical trials are required to understand the effectiveness of the second-line chemotherapy.
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Developers test many approaches to prevent HIV
Medscape Medical News
A variety of microbicides and other compounds for the prevention of HIV transmission are under investigation, including topical preparations, implantable devices, injections, and oral medications. Each delivery system has its advantages and disadvantages. For a microbicide to be successful, it must be effective, available and convenient.
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4 new coronavirus cases may indicate potential for epidemic
redOrbit
The World Health Organization has been informed of four additional laboratory-confirmed cases of infection with Middle Eastern respiratory syndrome coronavirus. The new cases may actually come as no surprise to an international group of experts who reported recently that the disease may become a "slowly growing epidemic."
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword CORONAVIRUS


Hepatitis C viral suppression reduces liver morbidity, death
Medscape Medical News
Achieving an undetectable hepatitis C viral load is associated with decreased liver morbidity and death, a large observational study using Veterans Affairs data finds. Dr. Jeffrey McCombs, Ph.D., from the University of Southern California School of Pharmacy in Los Angeles, explained that the time from undetectable viral load to first event was used instead of sustained viral response — the gold standard of treatment success — because it is much easier to obtain.
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New Affordable LED Lighting System

Bridging the gap between costly color-specific LED lighting and lower-cost conventional fluorescent lighting, Percival Scientific, Inc. has introduced the LED-Elite Series. These research chambers feature a multicolor LED lamp providing the correct spectral quality at the correct irradiance with exceptional environmental control every time. A webinar explaining the features and benefits is available at www.percival-scientific.com


Childhood cancer survivors face heart risks soon after treatment
Reuters
Children who survive cancer treatment face increased heart health risk and should take measures soon after life-saving therapy to reduce the risk of serious problems later in life, according to research presented at a major medical meeting. The five-year survival rate from childhood cancer has soared from 58 percent in 1975 to 1977, to 83 percent in the period from 2003 to 2009.
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Technology and medicine: Applying Google Glass in the medical field
By Rosemary Sparacio
Every day, new strides in technology make headlines in all kinds of areas. Nowhere is it is more prevalent or exciting than in the medical field. And one of the most talked about new tech "gadgets" to come onto the scene and into the consciousness of just about everyone who follows the news is Google Glass. Proponents see the potential for the device's use over a wide range of medical applications, from cutting down the time a physician has to do paperwork — thus giving the physician more time to focus on the patient's problem — to assisting in surgery.
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Cancer patient says odor got her banned from daughter's school
The Huffington Post
VideoBrief A New Mexico mother battling breast cancer claims that she was banned from her daughter's elementary school due to her smell. Kerri Mascareno has stage 4 breast cancer and is taking chemotherapy pills to shrink the tumor before surgery, according to local outlet KOBR-TV. Strong body odors can be a symptom of breast cancer, and Mascareno claims the principal of Tierra Antigua Elementary School has an issue with that.
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Flu season for humans raises questions about flu shots for dogs
National Geographic
That virus that makes humans feel achy, miserable, and generally gross can affect Fido, too. According to researchers, canine influenza came to human attention in 2004, when Cornell University's Edward Dubovi sequenced the virus and sent it to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Congress opens door to allowing HIV organ donations (The Hill)
Changes ahead in reimbursement for pathology lab, direct-to-consumer testing (Dark Daily)
Study: Too few with hepatitis C start or stick with treatment (HealthDay News)
Molecular sequencing of C. difficile reveals unexpected routes of infection (Infectious Disease Special Edition)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


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Decline in staph infections seen among veterans
dailyRx
The number of new cases and spread of Staph infections caused by a bacterium that does not respond to standard kinds of medicine have been declining among military veterans. A recent study found that the spread of a certain staph bacterium that causes serious infections has declined among patients seeking care at Veterans Affairs facilities.
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Study: Most men with breast cancer undergo mastectomy
HealthDay News
Breast cancer in men occurs only rarely. But among men who have breast cancer, mastectomy rather than breast-conserving surgery is by far the more common choice, new research shows. Scientists found that males undergo mastectomy surgery far more often than females — a whopping 87 percent of the time for men, compared with 38 percent for women.
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TRENDING ARTICLE
New layer to the body's fight against infection identified
Infection Control Today
The layers of skin that form the first line of defense in the body's fight against infection have revealed an unanticipated secret. The single cell type that was thought to be behind the skin's immune defense has been found to have a doppelganger.

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read more
Congress opens door to allowing HIV organ donations
The Hill
The House takes a step toward ending a ban on organ donations from HIV-positive patients. As HIV patients live longer, many are in need of new organs, and some doctors say they would face a much shorter waiting period if organs from other HIV patients were available.

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Study finds reservoir of hidden HIV bigger than once thought
Fox News
Over the past decade, scientists have made incredible strides in the field of HIV research. But a cure for the human immunodeficiency virus has still eluded scientists and now a new report from Howard Hughes Medical Institute has revealed that completely eradicating the virus may be much more difficult than previously thought.

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Study: Hand-washing rates low among emergency medical personnel
CBS News
A new study shows only 13 percent of emergency medical providers reported cleaning their hands before patient contact, according to the study from Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Brunswick, N.J. The study, which was administered through an online survey and distributed via email to national and regional emergency medical organizations, looked at almost 1,500 EMS providers. The results revealed a number of troubling trends.
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Why teens aren't practicing safe sex
Time
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the percentage of American students using condoms hit its peak at around 60 percent a decade ago, and has stalled since then, even declining among some demographics. Health officials from Oregon to Georgia are ringing alarm bells about rising rates of sexually transmitted diseases, worried that kids aren't getting the message.
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