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Watch the latest video application note from Waters: The Direct Analysis of Opioids and Metabolites from Whole Blood...

 



Measles cases triple in US; vaccine refusal to blame
Wired
Measles, one of the most communicable of all infectious diseases, is spiking in the United States, with three times as many cases as usual this year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said recently. The spike is due to both foreign importations — infected travelers coming from places where measles is not under control — and local vulnerability: unvaccinated children and adults in the United States.
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Lab-themed gift ideas
American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
Purchase lab-themed gifts for your favorite colleague! IPad covers, Kindle cases, T-shirts, mugs, badge holders and more!

Purchase at the ASCLS Online Store or the ASCLS Custom Store.

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Do you need year-end CE? ASCLS offers many options!
American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
A variety of learning activities are available — case studies, articles, session recordings from the Annual Meeting, archived webinars and more! Go to the ASCLS website for more information.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


Ensuring the Quality of Blood Spots Collected from Newborns — register for this archived webinar
American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
APHL and CLSI offer this pre-recorded P.A.C.E.®-approved webinar, which features experts from the CDC Newborn Screening and Molecular Biology Branch, explaining the newly released CLSI document NBS 01-A6. Topics include collection of high quality specimens, handling, shipping and storage of specimens and pain management. Register for the discounted price of only $99 per site, which includes unlimited access for all of your staff through May 21, 2014. Register now.
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Aging cells share features with cancer
Ars Technica
The older we get, the higher our risk of cancer. With age, we accumulate exposure to environments and chemicals that increase the risk of acquiring cancer-causing mutations. But the danger doesn't increase in a linear manner, and we know little about why there is such a dramatic increase with aging.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  CellaVision Automates and Standardizes the Manual Differential

CellaVision introduces CellAtlas®, the perfect way to learn the basics of hematology cell morphology. This App for the Apple iPhone and iPod Touch compliments our digital cell morphology portfolio, and is an educational tool to assist in the recognition and classification of blood cells, by utilizing mini-lectures and cell quizzes. More
 


White House pledges up to $5 billion to global infectious diseases fund
The Washington Post
President Barack Obama pledged to give up to $5 billion to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria over the next three years, saying that an "AIDS-free generation" may be within reach. The pledge represents $1 billion more than the United States committed during the previous round of funding in 2010, when Obama faced criticism for not doing enough and setting a bad example that gave other countries an excuse to limit their donations.
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Why do tumors become resistant to chemotherapy?
Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute via Science Codex
A common observation in oncology is the phenomenon that a patient with a tumor receives a drug and responds very well, but after a few months the cancer comes back and is now resistant to previously administered chemotherapy. What happened? Many mechanisms contribute to explain this effect called "acquired resistance," but Manel Esteller, director of epigenetics and cancer biology at the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, ICREA researcher, and professor of genetics at the University of Barcelona, describes in The Journal of The National Cancer Institute the existence of epigenetic differences that explain the lack of response of the tumor recurs.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword CHEMOTHERAPY




Some gut bacteria may affect colorectal cancer risk
Medscape Medical News
The gut microbiome of patients with colorectal cancer was less diverse than that of matched patients without cancer, and the presence of some taxa was associated with increased CRC risk, according to research published online in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. The results came from an analysis of fecal bacterial DNA from 47 patients with CRC and 94 control participants matched to the CRC group by sex and body mass index.
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To make hospitals less deadly, a dose of data
The New York Times
Going to the hospital is supposed to be good for you. But in an alarming number of cases, it isn't. And often it's fatal. In fact it is the most dangerous thing most people will do.
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  PRODUCT SHOWCASES
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Cleveland Clinic Laboratories is a full-service, national reference lab dedicated to providing world class care. We have a dedicated staff of more than 1,300 employees, including board-certified subspecialty pathologists, PhDs, technologists, technicians, and support personnel. Cleveland Clinic Laboratories is proud to serve hospitals, outpatient facilities and physician offices worldwide. For more information, please visit clevelandcliniclabs.com.
New Affordable LED Lighting System

Bridging the gap between costly color-specific LED lighting and lower-cost conventional fluorescent lighting, Percival Scientific, Inc. has introduced the LED-Elite Series. These research chambers feature a multicolor LED lamp providing the correct spectral quality at the correct irradiance with exceptional environmental control every time. A webinar explaining the features and benefits is available at www.percival-scientific.com


Vitamin D shows no benefit against cancer, heart disease
Bloomberg
Vitamin D supplements don't help prevent chronic diseases unrelated to the bones, according to a review of published research that challenges the prevailing wisdom held by proponents. While scientific evidence supports the importance of vitamin D for bone health, its benefits in reducing the risk of diseases ranging from cancer to heart disease as shown in 290 observational studies were largely unconfirmed in 172 randomized controlled trials, experiments considered the gold standard for establishing causal links, according to the review published recently in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology medical journal.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    As more meningitis cases hit colleges, experts urge awareness (HealthDay News)
How labs can work toward bridging the silos (ADVANCE for Administrators of the Laboratory)
Study: Many breast cancers may be linked with cholesterol byproduct (The Washington Post)
Disease surveillance enters the 21st century (Medscape Medical News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




Poor black and Hispanic men are the face of HIV
The New York Times
The AIDS epidemic in America is rapidly becoming concentrated among poor, young black and Hispanic men who have sex with men. Despite years of progress in preventing and treating HIV in the middle class, the number of new infections nationwide remains stubbornly stuck at 50,000 a year — more and more of them in these men, who make up less than 1 percent of the population.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
Measles cases triple in US; vaccine refusal to blame
Wired
Measles, one of the most communicable of all infectious diseases, is spiking in the United States, with three times as many cases as usual this year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said recently. The spike is due to both foreign importations and local vulnerability: unvaccinated children and adults in the United States.

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As more meningitis cases hit colleges, experts urge awareness
HealthDay News
A potentially deadly form of meningitis has now been reported at three U.S. colleges, and experts say that while it's not time to panic, students need to be aware of the possible symptoms and seek treatment for them right away.

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Hospitals try yogurt to prevent infections in patients
The Wall Street Journal
Holy Redeemer Hospital in Meadowbrook, Pa., was able to drive down cases of hospital infections after adding a new weapon to its arsenal: probiotics, the small organisms that help maintain the natural balance of bacteria in the intestines.

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Male breast cancer treated with more mastectomies
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Breast cancer is treated differently in men than in women, and men with breast cancer undergo mastectomy more often than women with the disease do. Although locally advanced female breast cancer is commonly treated with radiation, a new study found that radiation is used less in male disease.
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It is possible to think yourself well
Health.com via CNN
When people are doing everything "right" — eating veggies, avoiding red meat and processed foods, exercising, sleeping well and so forth — we should expect them to live long, prosperous lives and die of old age while peacefully slumbering, right? So why is it that so many health nuts are sicker than other people who pig out, guzzle beer and park in front of the TV?
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