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Exercise can ease pain from breast cancer drugs
USA Today
Supervised exercise may help relieve treatment-related pain among breast cancer patients, a new study finds. The study focused on hormonal therapies called aromatase inhibitors, which certain post-menopausal breast cancer patients take for up to five years after surgery.
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Do you need year-end CE? ASCLS offers many options!
American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
A variety of learning activities are available — case studies, articles, session recordings from the Annual Meeting, archived webinars and more! Go to the ASCLS website for more information.
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Lab-themed holiday gift ideas
American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
Purchase lab-themed gifts for your favorite colleague! IPad covers, Kindle cases, T-shirts, mugs, badge holders and more!

Purchase at the ASCLS Online Store or the ASCLS Custom Store.

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SPONSORED CONTENT


Ensuring the Quality of Blood Spots Collected from Newborns — register for this archived webinar
American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
APHL and CLSI offer this pre-recorded P.A.C.E.®-approved webinar, which features experts from the CDC Newborn Screening and Molecular Biology Branch, explaining the newly released CLSI document NBS 01-A6. Topics include collection of high quality specimens, handling, shipping and storage of specimens and pain management. Register for the discounted price of only $99 per site, which includes unlimited access for all of your staff through May 21, 2014. Register now.
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3 heart cases, deaths tied to Lyme disease
The Boston Globe
Three people in the Northeast who abruptly died in the past 13 months had an undetected heart inflammation caused by Lyme disease, according to a federal study that suggests death from the deer tick-borne bacteria is more common than previously thought. The study was prompted by a tissue bank doctor's discovery of an odd pattern of inflammation in the heart of a Massachusetts man who was found dead after a car accident a year ago.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  CellaVision Automates and Standardizes the Manual Differential

CellaVision introduces CellAtlas®, the perfect way to learn the basics of hematology cell morphology. This App for the Apple iPhone and iPod Touch compliments our digital cell morphology portfolio, and is an educational tool to assist in the recognition and classification of blood cells, by utilizing mini-lectures and cell quizzes. More
 


Global malaria deaths hit a new low
NPR
The death rate from malaria dropped by 45 percent globally between 2000 and 2012, the World Health Organization said recently. In Africa, the rate fell by almost half. Despite this progress, the mosquito-borne disease remains a serious problem in the developing world, said Dr. Robert Newman, who heads WHO's global malaria program.
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With immune cells in breast tumors, the more the merrier
Medscape Medical News
Researchers are increasingly shedding old notions that breast cancers lack immunogenicity or the ability to produce an immune response, in light of new evidence from 3 clinical trials presented recently at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. Each of the trials showed that the presence of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, which are a type of immune cell and were found primarily in breast stromal tissue, correlated positively with good outcomes.
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CDC: Flu vaccine prevented 6.6 million infections in 2012-13
Counsel & Heal
Due to the fact that flu vaccination rates are not as high as the U.S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention would like, the CDC and state governments have worked hard in increasing the vaccination rate by creating better vaccines, making them more accessible and educating the public about the benefits of the vaccine. In a new report, the CDC announced that in last year's flu season from 2012-13, the vaccine prevented 6.6 million infection.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword FLU


A better treatment for hepatitis C
The New Yorker
Sofosbuvir is the first hepatitis C treatment that does not require interferon injections, can be taken simply as a pill with other drugs and typically works in a fraction of the time of existing treatment cycles. According to Alan Franciscus, the executive director of the Hepatitis C Support Project, a patient-advocacy group that educates patients and clinicians about hepatitis C, "Sofosbuvir has the potential to change the treatment of hepatitis C because of the ease of use—one-pill-a-day therapy, very high cure rates, shorter treatment duration and fewer side effects."
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  PRODUCT SHOWCASES
If you only run QC once a day, we recommend this simple exercise.

Download our Patient Risk Management White Paper to read how a patient risk approach to QC means planning your QC based on the type or method of the test and its impact on patient outcomes when a failure is detected. As the world's leader in clinical laboratory QC, we're creating the groundwork to help you make the transition to patient-focused QC.

Call us today at 1-800-224-6723 to learn more or visit www.qcnet.com/
patientriskASCLS
Trust in Cleveland Clinic Laboratories

Cleveland Clinic Laboratories is a full-service, national reference lab dedicated to providing world class care. We have a dedicated staff of more than 1,300 employees, including board-certified subspecialty pathologists, PhDs, technologists, technicians, and support personnel. Cleveland Clinic Laboratories is proud to serve hospitals, outpatient facilities and physician offices worldwide. For more information, please visit clevelandcliniclabs.com.
New Affordable LED Lighting System

Bridging the gap between costly color-specific LED lighting and lower-cost conventional fluorescent lighting, Percival Scientific, Inc. has introduced the LED-Elite Series. These research chambers feature a multicolor LED lamp providing the correct spectral quality at the correct irradiance with exceptional environmental control every time. A webinar explaining the features and benefits is available at www.percival-scientific.com


FDA hopes to curb antibiotic use on farms
CNN
VideoBrief Farmers' frequent use of antibiotics to help their livestock grow is contributing to the rise of dangerous antibiotic-resistant bacteria, according to the Food and Drug Administration. Recently, the government agency announced a new plan to phase out the use of certain antibiotics in the food production industry.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Why do tumors become resistant to chemotherapy? (Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute via Science Codex)
Measles cases triple in US; vaccine refusal to blame (Wired)
Aging cells share features with cancer (Ars Technica)
To make hospitals less deadly, a dose of data (The New York Times)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




Mandatory immunizations for clinicians, staff, IDSA says
Medscape Medical News
The Infectious Diseases Society of America, the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America and the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society recommend that all healthcare employers require universal immunizations recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, according to a policy statement. Included with the mandated immunizations are those against measles, mumps and hepatitis B.
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What workers want in a job
By Mel Kleiman
When an employee quits, most managers take it personally — and for good reason. For more than 20 years, employee exit interview research has been telling us the No. 1 reason the best people leave is because they feel they are being poorly managed. Whether you're recruiting managers or hourly employees, there are five specific things everyone wants from a job. If you can provide most or all of them, you'll be able to attract and retain the employees you deserve — the best.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
Exercise can ease pain from breast cancer drugs
USA Today
Supervised exercise may help relieve treatment-related pain among breast cancer patients, a new study finds. The study focused on hormonal therapies called aromatase inhibitors, which certain post-menopausal breast cancer patients take for up to five years after surgery.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Why do tumors become resistant to chemotherapy?
Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute via Science Codex
A common observation in oncology is the phenomenon that a patient with a tumor receives a drug and responds very well, but after a few months the cancer comes back and is now resistant to previously administered chemotherapy. What happened?

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Hospitals try yogurt to prevent infections in patients
The Wall Street Journal
Holy Redeemer Hospital in Meadowbrook, Pa., was able to drive down cases of hospital infections after adding a new weapon to its arsenal: probiotics, the small organisms that help maintain the natural balance of bacteria in the intestines.

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Study: Washing hands in hot water wastes energy
National Geographic
People typically wash their hands seven times a day in the United States, but they do it at a far higher temperature than is necessary to kill germs, a new study says. The energy waste is equivalent to the fuel use of a small country.
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Patients with HCV and diabetes may benefit from antiviral therapy
Medical News Today
New research suggests that patients with both hepatitis C and diabetes may have their cardiovascular and kidney outcomes improved with antiviral therapy. This is according to a study published in the journal Hepatology.
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