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Students invited to participate in case presentations
American Society for Cytotechnology
The ASCT invites all current cytotechnology students to apply for participation in the 2014 Annual Student Interesting Case Presentations being held at the 2014 ASCT Conference, April 25–27, in Charleston, S.C. ASCT student member conference registrations and the awards for the top three presenters will be sponsored by the ASCT Foundation. Submission deadline is March 3.
See the Guidelines for Submission, Submission Form and Informational letter.

Conference registration is now open for the ASCT 2014 Annual Scientific Conference! Click here for all the information you need to join this great educational and networking opportunity.
Detailed information for potential conference exhibitors is available here.
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UPCOMING EVENTS

Date Event Location More information
Feb. 12
2 p.m. ET
Cytopathology of Soft Tissue: A Practical Approach Your PC The webinar will feature Liron Pantanowitz. M.D., associate professor of Pathology, director of FNA Clinic, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh
More information
Register
March 12
2 p.m. ET
A Practical Approach to On-Site Adequacy Assessment of Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsies Your PC
The webinar will feature Sara E. Monaco, M.D. associate professor, director of FNA Biopsy Service, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, director, UPMC Cytopathology Fellowship Program, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center–Shadyside Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pa.
More information
Register
May 3-6 McGill Cytopathology Review Course Montreal, Quebec
Course Director: Dr. Manon Auger. For further information contact: cme@muhc.mcgill.ca, McGill University Health Centre Continuing Education Office, phone: (514) 934-8253, fax: (514) 934-1779
More information

Available for 6 months after subscribing

Quality Assessment Center (QAC) Document Control for Cytopathology Workbench

Your PC

Details

Available for 6 months after subscribing

Quality Assessment Center (QAC)
The LEAN Cytopathology Laboratory Workbench

Your PC

Details


INDUSTRY NEWS


New study: Cervical cancer screening found to benefit older women
HealthDay News via WebMD
Cervical cancer screening beyond age 50 saves lives and remains beneficial to women up to age 69, a new British study suggests. The results showed that women who did not undergo cervical cancer screening after age 50 were six times more likely to be diagnosed with cervical cancer than those who had regular screenings between ages 50 to 64 and had no abnormalities.
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Precancerous cells on cervix tied to higher risk of disease, death
HealthDay News via Philly.com
Women who have been diagnosed with and treated for precancerous cells on the cervix may be at increased risk for developing and dying from cervical or vaginal cancer, new research suggests. However, the researchers added that the overall risk of cervical or vaginal cancer is still low for women who have been diagnosed and treated for abnormal cells on the cervix.
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The case for universal vaccination against HPV
Institute for Public Policy via Houston Chronicle
If we were told that we could prevent 20,000 cancers every year in the United States, save about 10,000 lives (almost twice the number of people lost in the recent Iraq and Afghanistan wars) and prevent hardships related to treating these cancers (surgery, radiation, chemotherapy), no effort would be spared. Universal HPV vaccinations can make this a reality, but instead, resistance to this sound medical practice continues.
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MORE NEWS


Chemical imaging brings cancer tissue analysis into the digital age
Imperial College London via R&D Magazine
When tests are carried out on a patient's tissue today, such as to look for cancer, the test has to be interpreted by a histology specialist, and can take weeks to obtain a full result. Mass spectrometry imaging uses technologies that reveal how hundreds or thousands of chemical components are distributed in a tissue sample. Scientists have proposed using MSI to identify tissue types for many years, but until now, no method has been devised to apply such technology to any type of tissue.
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New finding has major implications for genetic testing
Dark Daily
Different research studies are producing data that indicate a large proportion of humans may have more than one genome. This research has been enabled by advancements in both gene sequencing technology and the capabilities in computational and analytical software.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword GENETIC TESTING


Surgeon general report links more diseases, health problems to smoking tobacco
The Washington Post
Fifty years after the U.S. surgeon general first linked cigarette smoking to deadly diseases such as lung cancer and heart disease, his successors continue to add to the list of health problems associated with tobacco use. Smoking is a cause of liver cancer and colorectal cancer, the fourth-most-diagnosed form of the disease in the United States, Acting Surgeon General Boris D. Lushniak found in a report released recently.
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CDC: US lung cancer rate in men and women down
UPI
The rate of new lung cancer cases decreased among U.S. men and women from 2005 to 2009, federal health officials say. A report in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report found lung cancer rates fell 2.6 percent per year among men — from 87 to 78 cases per 100,000 men — and 1.1 percent per year among women — down 57 to 54 cases per 100,000 women.
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