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HPV vaccine doesn't promote riskier sexual behavior in teens
UPI
Research has debunked parents' concerns that the HPV vaccine encourages risky sexual behavior in teens. In addition, women who had not had sex when vaccinated were not more likely to start having sex post-vaccination, according to research coming out of the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and published recently in the journal Pediatrics.
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National Cytotechnology Day contest
American Society for Cytotechnology
The 2014 ASCT National Cytotechnology Day contest is open! See Contest Rules here. Submit your design and slogan by March 1 to info@asct.com. The $150 award will be mailed March 28 and the winning design will be recognized at the Annual Scientific Conference, April 25-27 in Charleston, S.C. Click here to learn more about NCD Day and its creation.
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UPCOMING EVENTS

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Available now 2014 Revised Edition Introduction to the Cytopreparation Laboratory Online Course Your PC
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Feb. 12
2 p.m. ET
Cytopathology of Soft Tissue: A Practical Approach Your PC The webinar will feature Liron Pantanowitz. M.D., associate professor of Pathology, director of FNA Clinic, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh
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March 12
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A Practical Approach to On-Site Adequacy Assessment of Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsies Your PC
The webinar will feature Sara E. Monaco, M.D. associate professor, director of FNA Biopsy Service, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, director, UPMC Cytopathology Fellowship Program, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center–Shadyside Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pa.
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May 3-6 McGill Cytopathology Review Course Montreal, Quebec
Course Director: Dr. Manon Auger. For further information contact: cme@muhc.mcgill.ca, McGill University Health Centre Continuing Education Office, phone: (514) 934-8253, fax: (514) 934-1779
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INDUSTRY NEWS


HPV study: Does vaccinating one sexual partner also benefit the other?
McGill University via ScienceDaily
A new study will examine whether vaccinating only one partner in a couple against the human papillomavirus can help prevent transmission of HPV to the unvaccinated partner.
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New technique developed to control cervical cancer
Investigación y Desarrollo via Medical News Today
A group of researchers from Mexico's General Hospital, Health Secretariat, Medicine Faculty and the Institute of Cellular Physiology of the National Autonomous University of Mexico identified a therapeutic target for cervix cancer: gene CDKN3. The researched performed at the lab indicates that when this gene is blocked in culture cancerous cells, the neoplastic proliferation greatly diminishes.
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HPV at-home tests have a future, researchers say
Reuters
Certain tests can detect precancerous cervical cells from self-collected samples with nearly the same accuracy as a physician's swab taken in a clinic, according to a new review of past studies. Compared with those gathered by a physician, self-collected samples were about 11 percent less sensitive in identifying precancerous growth.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword HPV TESTING


HPV test awareness, knowledge still low
Reuters
Americans are more aware that there is a test for the human papilloma virus than counterparts in the U.K. and Australia, according to a new study, but few people knew much more than that. People seem to be more aware of HPV vaccination than testing, however, which is not surprising given the publicity around the vaccine, said Jo Waller, the study's senior author Waller and a public health researcher at University College London.
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MORE NEWS


Researchers turn adult cells back into stem cells
USA Today
The future of medicine got a giant step closer with the publication of new research showing what may be a much easier way to turn regular cells into flexible stem cells, without destroying embryos. Stem cells have long been looked at as the future of medical care. But that potential has been limited — first by the controversial need to destroy embryos for the research, and more recently by the expensive and cumbersome techniques used to make stem cells without embryos.
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Long-living breast stem cells give clues to cancer cells of origin
Medical News Today
Researchers in Australia have found that breast stem cells and their "daughters" have a longer life than previously believed. This newly discovered longer lifespan suggests that these cells could carry damage or genetic defects earlier in life that eventually lead to cancer decades later.
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HIV/AIDS discovery shows how wrong assumptions can be
Forbes
Until recently, clinicians and scientists believed the human body went after the CD4+ T helper cells that were most infected by HIV. They assumed destroying the cells with the highest levels of the virus was the body’s way of trying to limit the disease. But new research contradicts this belief. Immunologist Warner Greene and his laboratory group at the Gladstone Institutes discovered that — 95 percent of the time — the body destroys the less infected, resting cells.
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ASCT Viewpoint
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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