This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Click here to advertise in this news brief.




  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Apr. 10, 2013

Home   About   Join Us   Annual Conference   The Voice   Career Center   Resources   Education Plus  

 

Cutting copays may increase women's cancer screening
INFORUM
More women may get screened for breast and cervical cancers if they don't have to pay for the tests, according to a new study from Japan. A year after the Japanese government started picking up the tab for Pap smears and mammograms for certain groups of women, the percentage of eligible women who got screened nearly doubled compared to a few years earlier when most women had to pay for screenings.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Introduction to the cytopreparation laboratory
American Society for Cytotechnology
This updated course is intended to provide fundamental information about the cytopreparation laboratory, supplementing the orientation materials typically given to new cytopreparatory employees when they are initially hired. The course is very basic, and assumes no prior knowledge of laboratory procedures.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Registration: Get the registration form HERE.


UPCOMING EVENTS





Event Location Date Details

ASCT Annual Conference Hotel Valley Ho
Scottsdale, Ariz.
   

April 19-20
   
   
More information

McGill Cytopathology Review Course Montreal, Quebec, Canada    

April 27-30
   
   
Email
or call (514) 934-8253
for more information




INDUSTRY NEWS


Latino teens take lead among peers in getting HPV vaccine
Fox News Latino
Latino teens are emerging as more aggressive than their counterparts when it comes to taking the initiative to get the HPV vaccine, according to recent findings by the National Health Interview Survey and the Vaccine medical journal. As part of a series of studies, Dr. Abbey Berenson and her colleagues at University of Texas Medical Branch found HPV vaccination rates in America are alarmingly low despite the vaccine's proven ability to provide immunity against HPV-related cancers.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


18 million cancer survivors expected by 2022
Time
An aging population coupled with improved treatment methods mean more people will survive cancer. But at what cost? The American Association for Cancer Research released its second Annual Report on Cancer Survivorship, which shows that the current 13.7 million cancer survivors in the U.S. will likely swell by 31 percent to 18 million by the year 2022.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Build A Powerful Online Presence
iPage makes it easy and affordable to create a powerful website for your business – no experience necessary. Add to that a 24x7 support team and tons of free marketing tools, and you’ve got the recipe for online success! You can drive more traffic and get more customers than ever before. MORE


Preventing cancer in the community
North American Precis Syndicate via San Diego Scoop
Cervical cancer affects women of color more than it does white women. One reason is that women of color are diagnosed with cervical cancer at a later stage than are white women. Black women are more likely to die from cervical cancer than women of other races or ethnicities, possibly because of decreased access to Pap testing or follow-up treatment.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword CANCER.


Study: Hormone therapy increases breast cancer risk, mortality
Los Angeles Times
In the nearly 11 years since researchers first rang alarm bells that women on hormone replacement therapy faced an increased risk of breast cancer, some have suggested that taking estrogen and progestin to treat symptoms of menopause might not be so dangerous after all. A new analysis of data from the Women’s Health Initiative, published by the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, concludes that the prognosis for cancers related to hormone replacement therapy is just as dire as for other breast cancers.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


MORE NEWS


Lab automation is happening faster than you think
Laboratory Equipment
Automation technology is revolutionizing the health care and food industries. From infusion pumps to 24/7 temperature control and real-time testing and analysis, the development of embedded smart technologies is leading to better care and safety, new growth and vastly improved research and analysis.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Researchers build functional ovarian tissue in lab
ScienceBlog
A proof-of-concept study suggests the possibility of engineering artificial ovaries in the lab to provide a more natural option for hormone replacement therapy for women. In Biomaterials, a team from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center's Institute for Regenerative Medicine report that in the laboratory setting, engineered ovaries showed sustained release of the sex hormones estrogen and progesterone.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Stem cells 'nanokicked' to grow new bone
BBC
A new technique has been developed by a Scottish research team that could help patients with spinal injuries grow new bone. Researchers call it "nanokicking." It plays on the potential our bodies' stem cells possess to turn into any other kind of tissue — blood, muscle or, in this case, bone.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Cell machinery untangles misfolded proteins
Evolution News and Views
A multipart machine in bacteria, fungi and plants is able to take "irreversible" aggregates of misfolded proteins and untangle them, then refold them for proper function. Aggregates have been implicated in diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, making the study of protein folding an important focus of research.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


 

ASCT Viewpoint
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Bob Kowalski, Content Editor, 469.420.2650   
Contribute news

This edition of ASCT Viewpoint was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues
March 27, 2013
March 13, 2013
Feb. 27, 2013
Feb. 13, 2013



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063