This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit April 23, 2014

Home   About   Join Us   Annual Conference   The Voice   Career Center   Resources   Education Plus  

 

WHO: 2 shots of HPV vaccine against cervical cancer enough
The Guardian
Reaching a greater number of girls in developing countries with the HPV vaccine that can prevent most cases of cervical cancer has just become more feasible. The World Health Organization's expert advisory group said that two shots of vaccine against human papillomavirus, rather than the three doses currently recommended, will offer sufficient protection to girls so long as they have it before they reach the age of 15.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  


New Cytology Education Learning Lab website is launched
American Society for Cytotechnology
Welcome to the new Cytology Education Learning Lab (CELL) website!

This website has been developed with input from many cytopathologists and cytotechnologists so that the new entry-level competencies for cytotechnology education that were recently approved by the Commissioner on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs can be more easily implemented by the Cytotechnology Programs. This site is intended to be a "one-stop" secure mechanism for locating fines and other resources to teach these new ELCs.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


UPCOMING EVENTS

Date Event Location More information
May 3-6 McGill Cytopathology Review Course Montreal, Quebec
Course Director: Dr. Manon Auger. For further information contact: cme@muhc.mcgill.ca, McGill University Health Centre Continuing Education Office, phone: (514) 934-8253, fax: (514) 934-1779
More information
May 6
3 p.m. ET
Cytology Education Learning Lab (CELL) Webinar Your PC
Moderator: Donald Schnitzler, CT(ASCP), Marshfield Clinic, Marshfield, Wis.
Click here for more information
May 28
2 p.m. ET
Preparing for the Unannounced Inspection Your PC The webinar will feature Connie Erdmann, MS, CT (ASCP), Cytology Supervisor, Mountain View Hospital, Payson, Utah
Register

Available for 6 months after subscribing

Quality Assessment Center (QAC) Document Control for Cytopathology Workbench

Your PC

Details

Available for 6 months after subscribing

Quality Assessment Center (QAC)
The LEAN Cytopathology Laboratory Workbench

Your PC

Details


INDUSTRY NEWS


Research sheds new light on the development of HPV-associated cancer
Ohio Supercomputer Center via The Medical News
Researchers at The Ohio State University have determined a new way that HPV might spark cancer development — by disrupting the human DNA sequence with repeating loops when the virus is inserted into host-cell DNA as it replicates. The study, recently published in the journal Genome Research and reviewed in The Scientist, leveraged the massive computational power of the Ohio Supercomputer Center systems.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Foundation seeks new therapy for HPV-related cancers
United Press International
The Farrah Fawcett Foundation and other groups are behind a new research effort to seek therapy for human papillomavirus-related cancers including cancers of the anus, cervix and head and neck. Stand Up To Cancer, the Farrah Fawcett Foundation and the American Association for Cancer Research announced at the AACR annual meeting in San Diego formation of a research team dedicated to developing a new vaccine for patients who have relapsed from HPV-related cancers.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Study: Immunization program in UK has cut HPV infections in young women
Society for General Microbiology via The Medical News
Each year around 2,000-2,500 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer in England, the most common cancer in women under 35. Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 is responsible for around 70-80 percent of cervical cancers. A study conducted by Public Health England shows a reduction in these two HR HPV types — which are included in the HPV vaccines used — in sexually active young women in England.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword INFECTION


New Zealand researchers: HPV vaccine good value for money
NewstalkZB
A University of Otago study has found the Government's investment in human papillomavirus vaccination provides good value for money. The vaccination program was introduced in New Zealand in 2008 for young women and has been routinely offered through schools in year eight or through primary care.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


MORE NEWS


Programs across the nation boosting interest in STEM fields
By Archita Datta Majumdar
There seems to a dichotomy between the STEM crisis and STEM demand in recent years. Conflicting reports claim that there are more STEM graduates than jobs available, while others claim that a lack of STEM graduates is a major factor in a surge of foreign students and more H1-B visas. Which one is true and which one should we believe? Perhaps a bit of both, but the underlying fact between the two is that we need a solid and indigenous population of graduates in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Electronic skin patch could treat diseases
Discovery News
Researchers have made an electronic skin patch that can monitor muscle movement, store the data it collects and use stored data patterns to decide when to deliver medicine through the skin. The patch could be useful for monitoring and treating Parkinson's disease and epilepsy, its creators say.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Creating body parts in a lab: 'Things are happening now'
CNN
Scientists in the United States, Mexico and Switzerland grew reproductive organs and nasal cartilage in labs and successfully implanted them in patients, according to two studies released in The Lancet. It is not the first time scientists have engineered body parts — in effect, creating organs where before there were none. What is different in these cases is the size and complexity of the organs.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


 

ASCT Viewpoint
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Bob Kowalski, Content Editor, 469.420.2650   
Contribute news

This edition of ASCT Viewpoint was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues
April 9, 2014
March 26, 2014
March 12, 2014
Feb. 26, 2014



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063