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E-reminders may boost HPV vaccination rates
HealthDay via U.S. News & World Report
Using electronic health records to issue reminders about human papillomavirus vaccination for young females significantly increased the number of patients who got the vaccine, which protects against cervical cancer. That's the finding of a new study that included more than 6,000 patients who, along with their doctors, received reminders via electronic health records. A control group of more than 9,000 did not receive reminders.
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William C. Faquin, M.D., Ph.D.
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Massachusetts General Hospital
Associate Professor of Pathology
Harvard Medical Center

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Study shows trophon EPR effective in inactivating high-risk, cancer-causing HPV
News Medical
A new study presented at the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America has demonstrated that the trophon EPR is the only high level disinfection system proven to kill natural, infectious, high-risk human papilloma virus under normal use conditions. High-risk HPV accounts for 5 percent of all cancers worldwide and is responsible for almost all cases of cervical cancer and is a leading cause of oral, throat, anal and genital cancers.
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Bevacizumab in recurrent metastatic cervical cancer
OncLive
Surgery and chemoradiotherapy are often curative for patients with early-stage and locally advanced cervical cancer; however, the treatment of patients with metastatic or recurrent disease after platinum-based chemoradiation remains a major challenge, with limited treatment options available. A number of Gynecologic Oncology Group studies have demonstrated that paclitaxel plus cisplatin is superior to other platinum-based doublets. Additionally, this treatment approach appears to be similar, if not superior, to non-platinum doublet, such as paclitaxel and topotecan, explains James Tate Thigpen, M.D.
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Surgical breakthrough preserves fertility after cervical cancer
WRAL-TV
For the thousands of women diagnosed each year with cervical cancer, the cost of the most common treatment – a hysterectomy – is the opportunity to have children. But it doesn't always have to end that way. A new procedure, which removes the cancer and the cervix but leaves the uterus intact, preserves the possibility of starting or growing a family.
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Uncovering mechanisms of replication in HPV
Bioscience Technology
Northwestern Medicine scientists have identified proteins that mediate aspects of virus replication in the lifecycle of human papillomavirus, a finding that may lead to new therapeutic targets for treatment of infections caused by the virus.
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MORE NEWS


Survey: Many providers want ICD-10 to just go away
By Scott E. Rupp
ICD-10 has been regularly stealing healthcare headlines for about two years and intermittently for years prior. The relevancy of the conversion from ICD-9 is based on the impending deadline, set for Oct. 1. Previous ICD-10 deadlines have been postponed, but federal agencies seem to be focused on sticking to this particular ICD-10 implementation deadline. Even with the deadline approaching, physicians and providers are not close to ready or willing to make the transition to the new medical coding set just yet, or so says the results of a new survey.
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Dense breasts are just 1 part of the cancer risk calculus
NPR
Almost half the states now require doctors to tell women if they have dense breasts because they're at higher risk of breast cancer, and those cancers are harder to find. But not all women with dense breasts have the same risks, a study says. Those differences need to be taken into account when figuring out each woman's risk of breast cancer, the study says, and also weighed against other factors, including family history, age and ethnicity.
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Cancer screening: An example of when less can be more, experts say
Los Angeles Times
Americans get too many tests to screen for common types of cancer, and the American College of Physicians wants them to stop. New clinical guidelines from the medical group include a litany of statistics that illustrate our obsession with cancer screening. Among them: About 6 in 10 adults submitted to a colonoscopy more often than they needed to. One-third of men who got a PSA test to screen for prostate cancer couldn't remember being asked by their doctor to do so. And 69 percent of women who had their cervix removed during a hysterectomy still got tested for cervical cancer.
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