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Adjuvanted HPV vaccine promoted long-term antibody persistence in preteen, adolescent girls
Healio
Data from an ongoing study indicate that the bivalent HPV vaccine induced high anti-HPV antibody levels up to 6 years after vaccination, which were predicted to remain above those induced by natural infection for at least 20 years.
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Cytopathology volunteer opportunities
ASCT
Want to learn more about volunteering for the CAP See, Test and Treat Program for underserved American women, Grounds for Health in South America, CerviCusco in Peru, The PAPS Team International in Kenya and the Viet/American Cervical Cancer Prevention Project in Vietnam?

Click here.

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UPCOMING EVENTS

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July 16 Cervicovaginal Cytology Screening: for Patients' Sake! Your PC
The webinar will feature Sonya Naryshkin, M.D., FIAC, Mercy Health System, Janesville, Wisconsin

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Quality Assessment Center (QAC) Document Control for Cytopathology Workbench

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Study finds method of HPV screening can be effective in developing countries
Infection Control Today
Health screens for cancer-causing infections like HPV can be challenging in developing countries, where residing in rural areas can result in limited access to health services. New research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham examined the prevalence of high-risk HPV in Nepal, and finds that one method of screening for it can be effective.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword SCREENING


Are routine pelvic exams 'more harm than good' for healthy women?
Medical News Today
The pelvic exam is a standard part of women's gynecologic checkup, but a new review by the American College of Physicians shows that for healthy women it is likely doing more harm than good, causing the doctors' group to issue a new guideline that advises against it. The new guideline, plus a report on the supporting evidence review, are published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, along with an editorial comment.
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Survival up after progression in HPV-positive oropharynx cancer
HealthDay via Medical Xpress
For patients with oropharynx cancer, human papillomavirus positivity is associated with improved survival after disease progression, according to a study published online June 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Carole Fakhry, M.D., from Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions in Baltimore, and colleagues examined the risk of death after progression for patients with HPV-positive OPC relative to HPV-negative OPC.
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MORE NEWS


Cancer therapy: Targeting in the field of metabolic rewiring
By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani
Of more than 100,000 carcinogen point mutations, 350 are known to influence cancer phenotype. However, 30 years of intensive research on cancer biology and large amounts of grant money invested have translated into few novel treatments. This raises many questions regarding the true value of development of multiple potential new therapeutics just to prove they cannot provide effective treatment for cancer. Perhaps we have missed the point. Metabolic reprograming of cancer cells could be yet another key to a more effective treatment for cancer.
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3-D mammograms find more cancers, but do they save lives?
USA Today
A new study shows that so-called 3-D mammograms find more breast cancer than regular digital mammograms, leading some doctors to predict that the exams will someday become the standard of care. Other breast cancer advocates caution that doctors still don't know whether finding these extra cancers will actually save lives, however, or simply lead more women to treatment.
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Violence has replaced infectious disease as the leading killer of people under 30
Medical Daily
The current state of affairs is pretty curious. We're living longer than we've ever lived before, but are we any healthier? Alzheimer's disease, for instance, wasn't a problem in the early 20th century. Sure, we hadn't discovered it yet, but that was because we didn't live long enough to contract it. And where infectious disease used to grip young people, a new report shows violence and injury have taken its place.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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