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Review of HPV vaccine side-effects
BBC
The European Medicines Agency has begun a review of HPV vaccines, looking into possible rare side-effects. Vaccination was introduced in 2008 for U.K. girls, to immunize them against the virus that causes cervical cancer. The agency says its review does not question that the benefits of vaccination outweighs any risk. It will focus on rare reports of two things — complex regional pain syndrome and a condition where standing up causes dizziness and rapid heart rate.
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INDUSTRY NEWS


Early push to require the HPV vaccine may have backfired
NPR
Nine years after it was first approved in June 2006, the HPV vaccine has had a far more sluggish entree into medical practice than other vaccines at a similar point in their history, according to a report in JAMA. This might not surprise those who remember the early days of the human papillomavirus vaccine, which was targeted at girls aged 11 and 12 to prevent a sexually transmitted infection that causes cancer — but which opponents quickly branded as a vaccine that would promote teenage promiscuity.
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Medicare now covers Pap smear and HPV tests for women 30 to 65
Modern Healthcare
Medicare will pay for women to get a joint Pap smear and human papillomavirus test every five years to screen for cervical cancer, according to a final national coverage decision. "CMS has determined that the evidence is sufficient to add HPV testing once every five years as an additional preventive service benefit under the Medicare program for asymptomatic beneficiaries aged 30 to 65 years in conjunction with the Pap smear test," the CMS said in its coverage notice.
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HPV genomes show greater diversity than expected among cervical cancer patients
GenomeWeb
The genomes of human papillomaviruses in cervical cancer patients are more diverse than expected, even within the same patient, according to researchers from the University of São Paulo in Brazil. The findings, published in Infection, Genetics and Evolution could have implications for eventually understanding why some cervical lesions become malignant. Human papillomaviruses are associated with invasive cervical cancer as well as more benign disorders such as skin warts. Although more than 180 HPV genomes have been sequenced, there has been little research on the diversity of HPV genomes within the same patient, primarily because the virus is thought to have a low mutation rate.
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How women could know they have cervical cancer before they even go to the doctor
The Washington Post
Cervical cancer screening aims to pick up and treat abnormal cells in the cervix before they become cancer. But for most gynaecological cancers, there isn't a screening program, so noticing symptoms and getting them checked out is the key to making sure cancer can be diagnosed at an early stage when treatment is most effective.
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MORE NEWS


HIV increases risk for death from common cancers
Healio
Patients with cancer who are HIV-infected experienced significantly higher cancer mortality rates compared with patients without HIV, according to study results. Mortality remained higher among patients with HIV regardless of cancer stage or treatment receipt, results also showed.
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Survey: Telemedicine use on the rise
By Scott E. Rupp
The latest telehealth report — one of many in a recent string — suggests the market is finally maturing. "Telehealth Index: 2015 Physician Survey" found strong support exists for video-based telemedicine, more so than for telephone or email communications. The report comes at a time when telehealth providers are making a strong push to qualify the video-based doctor's visit as comparable to a trip to the doctor's office, clinic or emergency room.
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ASCT Viewpoint
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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