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Study reveals impact of patient navigator program on no-show rates for cervical cancer screening
News Medical
Researchers at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital reported a 20 percent decline in the rate of missed appointments for cervical cancer evaluation following a Pap smear when a patient navigator program was initiated at the referral center. The impact of the program and the main reasons for patient no-shows are explored in an article in Journal of Women's Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.
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Cytopathology volunteer opportunities
ASCT
Want to learn more about volunteering for the CAP See, Test and Treat Program for underserved American women, Grounds for Health in South America, CerviCusco in Peru, The PAPS Team International in Kenya and the Viet/American Cervical Cancer Prevention Project in Vietnam?

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INDUSTRY NEWS


There are ways to get teens to vaccinate against HPV
USA Today
For the second year in a row, more teens are getting the first dose of the three-course HPV vaccine — though data show significant variation among states, leading officials from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to conclude that public health initiatives are effective at promoting more widespread adherence but more work needs to be done. The latest estimates, released by the CDC, show that 60 percent of girls and 42 percent of boys ages 13 to 17 have received one or more doses of the human papilloma virus vaccine, which targets a virus that can cause cervical and throat cancers. The numbers show an increase since 2013 of 3 percentage points for girls and 8 percentage points for boys.
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HPV in oral rinse may help detect oropharyngeal cancer
MedPage Today
Persistence of human papillomavirus DNA in post-treatment oral rinses had a significant association with worse outcome in HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer, a prospective cohort study showed. Patients with HPV-negative rinses had a two-year disease-free and overall survival 92 percent and 98 percent, respectively, whereas every patient with one or more positive rinses after treatment developed recurrence and half of them died.
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Cervical cancer survival influenced by presence of diabetes mellitus
Cancer Therapy Advisor
Diabetes mellitus was determined to be an independent unfavorable prognostic factor in Asian patients with early cervical cancer, according to an article published online in the journal The Oncologist. In this study, 2,946 patients diagnosed with primary stage 2-2A CC and received curative treatments between 2004 and 2008 were identified from the nationwide Taiwan Cancer Registry database. In total, 284 (9.6 percent) patients had DM.
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Cancer Institute experts offer MRI-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer
UC Academic Health Center
University of Cincinnati Cancer Institute physicians are now performing MRI-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer, helping to better image and deliver targeted therapies directly to the tumor while minimizing healthy organs and tissues. The cervix is the lower, narrow end of the uterus and leads from the uterus to the vagina. The main types of cervical cancer are squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Squamous cell carcinoma begins in the thin, flat cells that line the cervix.
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With $16 million Series B, Antiva hopes to kill cancer-causing HPV
Xconomy
Antiva Biosciences may have a new name, but its mission is the same: to develop the first antiviral therapy meant to stop human papillomavirus infections from turning into cancer. The Menlo Park, California-based company, founded in 2012 as Hera Therapeutics by Karl Hostetler, now has some funding to pursue its vision. Antiva announced this morning that it has received a $16 million Series B round to help it take its lead antiviral compound, ABI-1968, through Phase 1 trials. The round was led by Canaan Partners and Sofinnova Ventures.
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MORE NEWS


Study: Effective ovarian cancer treatment is underused
The New York Times
In 2006, the National Cancer Institute took the rare step of issuing a "clinical announcement," a special alert it holds in reserve for advances so important that they should change medical practice. In this case, the subject was ovarian cancer. A major study had just proved that pumping chemotherapy directly into the abdomen, along with the usual intravenous method, could add 16 months or more to women's lives. Cancer experts agreed that medical practice should change — immediately.
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CDC to spend $110 million helping states track, prevent diseases
The Hill
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced plans to spend $110 million, $13 million more than 2014, to help states track and respond to infectious diseases. This year's funding, which is allocated through the Epidemiology and Laboratory Capacity for Infectious Diseases Cooperative Agreement, includes $17.4 million to prevent and track foodborne illnesses, $4 million more than what was spent in 2014.
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Worse gynecologic cancer outcomes in women enrolled in both Medicare, Medicaid
Gynecologic Cancer Advisor
Women with gynecologic cancer age 65 or older who are dually enrolled in Medicare and Medicaid have a 34 percent increased risk of all-cause mortality after diagnosis compared to women in the Medicare population who are not dually enrolled, according to a recent study published online ahead of print in Cancer. In a local population-based cohort study, Kemi Doll, M.D., and fellow researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill examined 4,522 women 65 or older — 3,702 enrolled in Medicare and 820 dually-enrolled — who were diagnosed with some form of gynecologic cancer from 2003 to 2009.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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