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Clinical trial provides women with more accurate way to detect cervical cancer
News-Medical
Jersey Shore University Medical Center is conducting a clinical trial that provides women with a more accurate way to detect cervical cancer. The clinical research study, led by Mark Martens, M.D., chair of Obstetrics & Gynecology at Jersey Shore University Medical Center and world renowned expert in women's health, includes a free Pap test and HPV screening that more effectively evaluates a woman's chance of developing cervical cancer.
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INDUSTRY NEWS


CDC: Too few kids get HPV vaccine
NBC
Too few kids are getting HPV vaccines that protect them from a range of cancers, including cervical cancer and cancers of the throat and mouth, federal health officials said. And lackluster response to the vaccine might be because pediatricians just aren't recommending it, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. The annual survey of how many U.S. children are getting vaccinated shows hardly any improvement in use of the HPV vaccine, which protects against the human papillomavirus that causes a range of cancers, as well as genital warts.
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Blood and saliva test for HPV-related cancers 'in development'
Medical News Today
Oropharyngeal cancers linked to high-risk human papillomavirus are becoming more common in the U.S., with some studies suggesting that 70 percent of oropharyngeal cancers are HPV-related. Usually, patients with these cancers are examined every 1-3 months in the first year following diagnosis. However, the location of oropharyngeal cancers — tonsils, throat, base of the tongue — can make them less visible to physicians, so recurring cancer is usually only detected when patients report ulcers, pain or lumps in the neck.
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Decades of free cancer screening for poor US women
Medscape
A huge national program in the United States that offers free screening for breast and cervical cancer to low-income and uninsured women has served more than 4 million women since it began in 1990, likely preventing thousands of cancer deaths that would have otherwise occurred. The success of the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has led to a call for the lessons that have been learned from this program to be implemented across the American healthcare system.
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HPV vaccine catch up may be cost-effective up to age 22
Healio
New data suggest that HPV vaccination catch-up programs may be warranted, but the cost-effectiveness of these programs past age 22 is uncertain. "The cost-effectiveness of vaccinating beyond this age becomes more uncertain as the upper vaccine age limit is influenced by several decisive factors, most notably, the level of vaccine protection among women with previous exposure to vaccine-targeted HPV types," researchers from the University of Oslo, Norway, and the Harvard School of Public Health, wrote in the Journal of Infectious Diseases.
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Study: HPV test better than Pap for assessing cervical cancer risk
Fox News
Testing for human papillomavirus may be the best way to know whether a woman is at risk of developing cervical cancer in the near future, according to a study. Negative HPV tests provided women with more reliable assurance that they wouldn't develop cancer or other abnormal cervical changes in the next three years, compared to traditional Pap tests, researchers report.
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MORE NEWS


Cancer should be classified by genetic and molecular type, say scientists
Medical News Today
A research network in the U.S. proposes that cancer should be classified according to genetic and molecular features rather than by the type of tissue in which the tumor arises. While more work is needed to confirm and build on findings that look set to rewrite oncology textbooks, the scientists say such a system would be better for patients because it would help tailor treatment to their individual needs.
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False hope for new superbug treatments
By Mike Wokasch
The lack of effective treatments for antibiotic-resistant "superbugs" represents a serious global healthcare issue with potentially disastrous consequences. In the hopes of finding new treatments, a number of organizations and governments are struggling to secure and provide sufficient financial and nonfinancial incentives to encourage more research. Unfortunately, the fallacy of some of these initiatives is that more money, more companies and more compounds will not deliver the products we need.
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