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Study: Cervical cancer overlooked in less-developed nations
HealthDay News
Cervical cancer prevention, screening and treatment are neglected in low- and middle-income countries, a new study reveals. This is in contrast to the substantial reductions in death rates and increased access to reproductive healthcare in those nations in recent years, according to researchers at the University of California, San Francisco.
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The ASCT supports the ASCP ACTION ALERT
American Society for Cytotechnology
Massive cuts in payment rates for pathology and laboratory services could occur as a result of a proposed regulation from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. CMS is proposing that some pathology and laboratory services would be decreased as much as 50 to 80 percent.

In response, ASCP is urging everyone to contact their members of Congress as soon as possible. The proposed cuts are outlined in the CMS' 2014 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule proposed rule. The proposed cuts apply to the technical component and global payments for pathology and laboratory services.

ASCP is asking you to use the ASCP e-Advocacy Center to send a quick message to your representatives in Congress, urging them to contact CMS in opposition to the proposed payment cap. ASCP has developed a customizable draft letter so that contacting your members of Congress will take only few minutes.

For more detail on the cuts proposed by CMS for pathology and laboratory services, see ASCP's recent analysis in ASCP e-Policy News.

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UPCOMING EVENTS

Date Event Location More information
Sept. 4, 2 p.m. ET Safety Strategies in the Cytology Laboratory Your PC The webinar will feature Dan Scungio, MT (ASCP), SLS, CQA (ASQ), Laboratory Safety Officer, Sentara Healthcare, Tidewater, Va.
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Sept. 28

Cytology Association of Alabama Annual Meeting

The Club, Birmingham, Ala.

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Oct. 5

St. Louis Society of Cytology Annual Meeting

Norwood Hills Country Club, St. Louis, Mo.

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Quality Assessment Center (QAC) Document Control for Cytopathology Workbench

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Available for 6 months after subscribing

Quality Assessment Center (QAC)
The LEAN Cytopathology Laboratory Workbench

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Researchers: Oral health has role in HPV infection
MedPage Today
Poor oral health is an independent risk factor for oral infection with human papillomavirus, including the strains associated with cancer, researchers reported. In a nationally representative survey, people who reported they had poor oral health had a 56 percent increase in the risk of HPV infection in the mouth and throat, according to Thanh Cong Bui and colleagues at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in Houston.
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As numbers lag, HPV vaccine debate rages
Star Tribune
A large trend among young Americans declining vaccination against human papillomavirus troubles some public health officials, who say the HPV vaccine could save thousands lives and prevent dangerous cancers if more young Americans got it. Only about half of U.S. teenage girls have gotten the vaccine, according to a new report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — even though the CDC has recommended it since 2006.
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HPV vaccine wears off quickly in HIV-positive women
Family Practice News
Women with HIV probably need a booster shot of HPV vaccine within 2 years to maintain efficacy, according to a Canadian study of quadrivalent HPV vaccine in 136 HIV-positive women. Antibody response to the vaccine is strong enough at 2 years to protect about 90 percent of HIV-negative women against HPV. "But in our population, with approximately a year and a half of follow-up, that number decreased to about 63 percent," said lead investigator Erin Moses, R.N., a researcher at the Women's Health Research Institute in Vancouver, B.C.
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Improved male HPV vaccination to improve women's health
The Varsity
New research from University of Toronto professor Peter A. Newman suggests that increasing HPV vaccination rates among males aged 11 to 21 is an important component of protecting both men's and women's health. Among men, the perceived lack of any correlation between HPV and a life-threatening illness has made it difficult for the vaccine to gain traction.
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MORE NEWS


Innovative labs use business intelligence to deliver data insights
Dark Daily
Healthcare's accelerating shift away from fee-for-service payment and toward value-based reimbursement presents new challenges to clinical laboratories and pathology groups. These new payment models motivate providers to seek strategic partners who can deliver added value. To succeed in this paradigm, clinical laboratories must differentiate themselves.
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High-throughput screening for RNA interference
By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani
RNA interference, or RNAi, involves the knockdown of specific gene functions. It is a reverse genetic approach for the functional analysis of a large number of genes. Furthermore, it offers the identification of structure or function of the genes, relevant to specific pathway by gene knockdown mechanisms. RNAi screening is also used for better understanding of host-pathogen interaction and cancer biology. RNAi screening has also been automated for high-throughput drug discovery studies and requires a good knowledge of computer science and engineering for automated high-content image acquisition and analysis.
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New microchip sorts white blood cells from whole blood news
domain-B
Early in 2012, MIT scientists reported on the development of a postage stamp-sized microchip capable of sorting cells through a technique, known as cell rolling, that mimics a natural mechanism in the body. Now the group has developed a new microchip that can quickly separate white blood cells from samples of whole blood, eliminating any preliminary processing steps — which can be difficult to integrate into point-of-care medical devices.
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Longer funding cycles vital in cancer research
Health Canal
If we want to cure cancer we need to think like venture capitalists. We need to recognize that making a real impact in medical research demands big, radical ideas and the willingness to take commensurate risks. UNSW Medicine's recent breakthrough in the treatment of neuroblastoma, a devastating childhood cancer, and melanoma is an important case in point.
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Nanoparticles reprogram immune cells to fight cancer
Science World Report
Researchers at the University of Georgia are developing a new treatment technique that uses nanoparticles to reprogram immune cells so they are able to recognize and attack cancer. In their experiments, Shanta Dhar and her colleagues exposed cancer cells in a petri dish to specially designed nanoparticles. The nanoparticles invade the cell and penetrate the mitochondria — the organelles responsible for producing the energy a cell needs to grow and replicate.
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ASCT Viewpoint
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Bob Kowalski, Content Editor, 469.420.2650   
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