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Report shows that HPV vaccine trials can be shortened significantly
Infection Control Today
A new report from a working group convened by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, the specialized cancer agency of the World Health Organization and the United States National Cancer Institute shows how the evaluation and licensing of prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccines could be significantly accelerated. Experts with wide-ranging expertise in HPV vaccines reviewed the scientific evidence to determine under what circumstances vaccine efficacy can be established at an earlier stage of the infection, rather than the clinical onset of disease in the cervix.
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ASCT/ASCT Services Exhibit at ASC 2014
ASCT

Make sure to stop by the ASCT Booth in the Exhibit Hall during the Nov. 14 -17, 2014 ASC Annual Scientific Meeting in Dallas. Pick up a webinar schedule; order a Quality Assurance Center Module; renew your membership; and/or treat yourself to a tote bag, HPV plushie, microscope pin, notecards or playing cards. ASCT Executive Director Beth Denny will be at Booth # 312.




ASCT Services, Inc. will be next door in Booth # 314. Stop by and learn more about joining ASCT Services' highly skilled laboratory survey teams. ASCT Services, Inc. directly impacts and improves patient care by upholding cytology CLIA regulations as well as individual laboratory standards and procedures. Learn more about this rewarding opportunity.

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UPCOMING EVENTS

Date Event Location More information
Sept. 18
2 p.m. EST
Skills and Tools Required to be a Good Laboratory Manager Your PC
Anil R. Prasad, M.D., Associate Professor, Department of Pathology at the University of Arizona Health Science Center in Tucson, Arizona.
More info | Register
Oct. 8
2 p.m. EST
How to Stand out in a Crowd: Differentiating Hyperchromatic Crowded Groups (HCGs) Your PC

Donna Russell, M.Ed., CT(ASCP) HT, Education Coordinator, Cytopathology
Residency / Fellowship Program, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York
More info | Register
Oct. 21-22 Northeast Laboratory Conference Portland, Maine
Holiday Inn By The Bay
207-775-2311 or 800-345-5070
Details

Available for 6 months after subscribing

Quality Assessment Center (QAC) Document Control for Cytopathology Workbench

Your PC

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Available for 6 months after subscribing

Quality Assessment Center (QAC)
The LEAN Cytopathology Laboratory Workbench

Your PC

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Finding better ways to treat, prevent HPV
Fred Hutch News Service
Twenty-nine years ago, scientists didn't know what caused many of the genital-tract cancers they studied, much less how to stop them. Today, not only has human papillomavirus been pinpointed as the viral perpetrator behind nearly all genital-tract and some head and neck cancers, there’s now an incredibly effective vaccine that can prevent high-risk HPV infections from ever developing into cancer.
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Startup's antiviral drug combats HPV, new study shows
MedCity News
Startup Hera Therapeutics is developing a topical antiviral drug that attacks human papillomavirus — and early studies are showing it can successfully combat three strains, including two that cause 70 percent of all cervical cancer. The drug candidate, HTI-1968, blocked the replication of HPV-16, HPV-18 and HPV-11 cells, according to the NIAID-sponsored study.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword ANTIVIRAL


Is the HPV vaccine necessary?
Medical Xpress
As the school year starts in full swing, many parents wonder if their child should receive the HPV vaccine, which is recommended for girls ages 11-26 and boys 11-21. There are a lot of questions and controversy around this vaccine, but many pediatricians say it comes down to protecting people from a leading cause of death.
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Facebook, online surveys track HPV vaccinations at local level
HealthData Management
Facebook-based recruitment and online surveys are effective in estimating local variation in human papillomavirus vaccine uptake among young men and women, according to University of Minnesota researchers. In a study published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, men and women 18-30 years of age were recruited by location (within a 25-mile radius of Minneapolis) via a targeted Facebook advertisement campaign to complete an online survey about HPV vaccination practices.
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Girls' mystery illness possibly linked to cervical cancer vaccine
The Associated Press via Detroit Free Press
A mystery illness has overwhelmed a small town in northern Colombia as scores of teenage girls have been hospitalized with symptoms that parents fear could be an adverse reaction to a popular vaccine against cervical cancer. Authorities say they still don't know what caused more than 200 girls in El Carmen de Bolivar to come down with symptoms ranging from fainting to numbness in the hands and headaches. Some have hinted that the town of 95,000 near Colombia’s Caribbean coast could be experiencing a rare case of mass hysteria.
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Study: Text message-based cancer screening education may help at-risk minority groups
mobihealthnews
In a recent JMIR study, a team of researchers in Minnesota explored the potential of mobile health to reach people who sometimes fall through the cracks of the healthcare system. They found that a text message intervention could help Korean American women, a group that has one of the highest cervical cancer mortality rates in the United States, seek preventative screenings.
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MORE NEWS


How the Affordable Care Act is changing emergency medicine
By Stephanie McKenzie
The Affordable Care Act is affecting all areas of medicine, and emergency room care is no exception. The way emergency medicine and particularly payments are handled is changing with the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. Here is what you need to know about the changes and how they may affect your practice. A recent study from the Annals of Emergency Medicine looked at payments for emergency visits between 2005 and 2010. More than 18,000 ER and urgent care patient visits were included in this study, and the results were interesting.
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FDA pushes forward with plans to regulate laboratory developed tests
Dark Daily
After sitting in a state of suspended animation for several years, the Food & Drug Administration's plans to regulate laboratory-developed tests are now front and center. On July 31, the FDA served the required 60-day legal notice to Congress that it was ready to move forward to issue rules for regulation of LDTs. If the federal agency wanted to get the full attention of the clinical laboratory industry, it certainly succeeded. In the four weeks since the FDA alerted Congress of its plans for LDT regulation, there has been a flood of national news stories about this development.
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Study: Double mastectomies don't yield expected results
NPR
More women are choosing to have bilateral mastectomies when they are diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer, even though there's little evidence that removing both breasts improves their survival compared with more conservative treatments. The biggest study yet on the question has found no survival benefit with bilateral mastectomy compared with breast-conserving surgery with radiation. The study, published in JAMA, the journal of the American Medical Association, looked at the records of all women in California who were diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer from 1998 to 2011 — 189,734 women, all told.
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ASCT Viewpoint
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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