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Agreement on use of information from 61-year-old cervical cancer cells sets new ethical privacy standards
Dark Daily
Patient privacy rights involving genetic information has gone to a new level. Pathologists and clinical laboratory managers will want to understand the legal precedents and new standards established in an unprecedented agreement between the family of a woman who died in 1951 and the growing research establishment studying her cervical cancer cells following her death.
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CAAHEP Open Hearing — Cytotechnology
American Society for Cytotechnology
On Monday Oct. 21 from 2-3 p.m. EDT, the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs will be conducting an Open Hearing webinar on the proposed Standards and Guidelines for the Accreditation of Education Programs in Cytotechnology. Appendix B of the Standards and Guidelines contains the proposed Curriculum in Cytotechnology for Entry-level Competencies. The proposed Standards and Guidelines have been posted to the CAAHEP website. Send your comments directly to the CAAHEP office at megivern@caahep.org by 5 p.m. EDT on Oct. 1.

Please use this link for additional information and to register for the Open Hearing Webinar.

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UPCOMING EVENTS

Date Event Location More information

Sept. 28

Cytology Association of Alabama Annual Meeting

The Club, Birmingham, Ala.

More information

Oct. 5

St. Louis Society of Cytology Annual Meeting

Norwood Hills Country Club, St. Louis, Mo.

More information

Oct. 23, 2 p.m.

Quality Indicators in Gynecologic Cytology: Recommendations for Best Practices

Your PC

The webinar will feature Jennifer A Brainard, M.D., Section Head, Cytopathology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio
More information
Register

Available for 6 months after subscribing

Quality Assessment Center (QAC) Document Control for Cytopathology Workbench

Your PC

Details

Available for 6 months after subscribing

Quality Assessment Center (QAC)
The LEAN Cytopathology Laboratory Workbench

Your PC

Details


INDUSTRY NEWS


New hope for ovarian cancer
By Dorothy L. Tengler
Despite advances in treatment, ovarian cancer remains a highly lethal disease, mainly because most women with ovarian cancer are diagnosed when the disease is at a late stage. When ovarian cancer is found in its early stages, treatment is most effective. A new way of screening for ovarian cancer appears to detect the disease in early stages. If confirmed in clinical trials, the test could become a routine screening for women.
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Industry Pulse: Do these findings suggest that using longitudinal screening strategy may be beneficial?
ANSWER NOW


Genomic differences in types of cervical cancer may affect treatment choices
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Marked differences in the genomic terrain of the two most common types of cervical cancer suggest that patients might benefit from therapies geared to each type's molecular idiosyncrasies, according to a new study. The new study, conducted by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, is the first to compare the spectrum of cancer-related gene mutations in the two main subtypes of cervical cancer, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma.
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Researchers use Pap test to detect ovarian and endometrial cancers
ADVANCE
Using a highly accepted and widely used Pap test for more than HPV screening may be the diagnostic equivalent of "more bang for the buck." That sort of helpful screening blast may be what researchers at Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center discovered when they used cervical fluid obtained during routine Pap tests to run a parallel test for ovarian and endometrial cancers.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword PAP TEST


Scientists find new gene linked to ovarian cancer
Cancer Research UK via Medical Xpress
Cancer Research UK scientists have found a gene in mice that could protect against ovarian cancer and, if faulty, may increase the chance of developing the disease, according to research published in Nature. This gene, known as Helq, helps repair any damage to DNA that happens when it is copied as cells multiply. So if the gene is missing or faulty, DNA errors could mount up, increasing the chance of cancer developing.
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MORE NEWS


Cells reprogrammed in living mice
Science
VideoBrief Researchers have discovered a surprisingly effective way to "reprogram" mature mouse cells into an embryolike state, able to become any of the body's cell types. Their recipe: Let the transformation happen in a living animal instead of a petri dish. The finding could help scientists better understand how reprogramming works and it may one day help breed replacement tissues or organs in the lab — or in patients.
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Experts: US cancer care in crisis
NBC News
Cancer may be the most feared diagnosis, but Americans are getting disorganized care and they're often not even getting treatment based on the best scientific evidence, a panel of experts reports. It's often too expensive, and the most privileged are getting far better care than people with lower income, minorities, people who live away from big cities and the elderly.
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HIV patients with cancer pose treatment challenge
MedPage Today
HIV patients with cancer should avoid antiretroviral therapy based on protease inhibitors if possible, a researcher said. In a retrospective analysis, patients on a PI-based regimen had more side effects and were less likely to maintain anti-HIV efficacy six months after diagnosis. On the other hand, patients taking a regimen based on either an integrase inhibitor or and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor had fewer adverse events and better efficacy.
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Research brings a DNA double take
The New York Times
Not long ago, researchers had thought it was rare for the cells in a single healthy person to differ genetically in a significant way. But scientists are finding that it's quite common for an individual to have multiple genomes.
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ASCT Viewpoint
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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