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Cancer-fighting cocktail shows promising results for advanced cervical cancer
News Medical
Combining a standard chemotherapy drug with a second drug that stops cells from dividing improves both the survival and response rates for those with advanced cervical cancer, a new study by UT Southwestern Medical Center cancer researchers finds. The cancer-fighting cocktail, which combines the chemotherapy drug cisplatin with pemetrexed — an agent that stops cancer cells from dividing — showed promising results for advanced, persistent or recurrent cervical cancer.
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ASC's Position Statement on State Licensure for Cytotechnologists
ASCT
The ASCT encourages your participation in the open comment period for the American Society of Cytopathology's (ASC) Position Statement on State Licensure for Cytotechnologists. Please read the Position Statement and Guidelines documents. There is a comment form for your input which will be available until Oct. 14, 2014.
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UPCOMING EVENTS

Date Event Location More information
Oct. 8
2 p.m. EST
How to Stand out in a Crowd: Differentiating Hyperchromatic Crowded Groups (HCGs) Your PC


Donna Russell, M.Ed., CT(ASCP) HT, Education Coordinator, Cytopathology
Residency / Fellowship Program, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York
More info | Register
Oct. 21-22 Northeast Laboratory Conference Portland, Maine
Holiday Inn By The Bay
207-775-2311 or 800-345-5070
Details
Nov. 6
2 p.m. EST
Skills and Tools Required to be a Good Laboratory Manager Your PC


Anil R. Prasad, M.D., Associate Professor, Department of Pathology at the University of Arizona Health Science Center in Tucson, Arizona.
More info | Register

Available for 6 months after subscribing

Quality Assessment Center (QAC) Document Control for Cytopathology Workbench

Your PC

Details

Available for 6 months after subscribing

Quality Assessment Center (QAC)
The LEAN Cytopathology Laboratory Workbench

Your PC

Details


INDUSTRY NEWS


New HPV vaccine prevents 90 percent of cervical cancer
Medical Daily
A new vaccine for the human papillomavirus has been found to boost protection against cervical cancer by as much as 20 percent, according to a study published in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. In 2006, the Food and Drug Administration approved an HPV vaccine that covered, and continues to cover, four genotypes of the virus: 6, 11, 16 and 18.
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Breast, cervical cancer screening for millions of US women
JAMA
During its first 20 years, the federally funded National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program provided screening and diagnostic services to more than 4.3 million women, diagnosing 54,276 breast cancers, 2,554 cervical cancers, and 123,563 precancerous cervical lesions, according to a recent study.
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Young women don't recognize cervical cancer symptoms
Laboratory Equipment
New research led by King's College London suggests that many women under 30 with cervical cancer are diagnosed more than three months after first having symptoms. In many cases, this was because they did not recognize the symptoms as serious. The study was published in the British Journal of General Practice.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword SYMPTOMS


HPV vaccine rates not linked to knowledge about it
Medical News Today
Knowledge about HPV and the benefits of vaccination does not appear to spur parents — or the kids who need it — to take it up. The new study that came to this conclusion found neither more nor less knowledge about the Human Papillomavirus and the vaccine seems to affect the take-up rate, leading researchers to question the value of public knowledge and education campaigns.
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HPV guideline improves diagnosis
Medscape
New human papillomavirus guidelines recently adopted by the World Health Organization are helping physicians obtain more reproducible and consistent biopsy diagnoses of squamous lesions, delegates learned here at the College of American Pathologists 2014 meeting. The recommendations will help physicians more accurately evaluate a patient's risk for precancer, steering committee member and presenter Teresa Darragh, M.D., from the University of California at San Francisco, told Medscape Medical News. This should result in more effective patient management and improved outcomes, she said.
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Study: HPV vaccine cut rates of genital warts 61 percent
TIME
The HPV vaccine is working for young women in Australia, suggests a new study published in the journal PLOS One. Researchers analyzed a database of more than one million patients and found that since Australia began providing the HPV vaccine free to women ages 15-27 in 2007, the rate of genital warts fell 61 percent from four years before the vaccination program began.
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HPV vaccination rates still low for boys
Live Science
The human papillomavirus is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States. But although half of HPV carriers are male, most doctors still are not recommending the HPV vaccine to their male patients, according to a new study. Less than 15 percent of pediatricians and family physicians surveyed reported routinely recommending the vaccine for males ages 9 to 26, whereas about 50 percent said they recommend the vaccine to females in the same age group. This disparity has resulted in particularly low HPV vaccination rates for boys, according to the study.
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MORE NEWS


Research: HPVs may contribute to post-transplant skin cancer
By Chelsea Adams
Some betapapillomaviruses may contribute to an increased occurrence of squamous cell skin cancer in patients who have undergone organ transplantation. That's according to researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. Transplant patients routinely receive immunosuppressive therapy to prevent graft rejection. Immunosuppression increases patients' risk of contracting cancers with a viral etiology since the therapy reduces the body's immune response to viruses like human herpesvirus 8, which causes Kaposi’s sarcoma; and the Epstein-Barr virus that causes non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
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ASCT Viewpoint
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