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Cultural differences shed light on HPV vaccination completion
Infectious Diseases Society of America via Science Codex
Although they are at higher risk for cervical cancer, girls from low-income families are less likely to receive the human papillomavirus vaccine that prevents it, and the reasons they are not fully vaccinated differ depending on whether their parents are English-speaking or Spanish-speaking, suggests research. In the study, Spanish-speaking parents whose daughters were not fully vaccinated said their providers either did not encourage the vaccine or didn't explain that three shots were necessary for full protection.
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ASCT Quality Assessment Center
American Society for Cytotechnology
The ASCT Quality Assessment Center is currently offering two "workbenches," which are topics developed by cytotechnologists for cytotechnologists. They are designed to provide you with the tools and knowledge you need to manage the day-to-day operations of a modern cytology laboratory. See the Events Box below for more information on The Lean Cytopathology Laboratory Workbench and the Document Control Workbench.
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UPCOMING EVENTS

Date Event Location More information

Oct. 23, 2 p.m.

Quality Indicators in Gynecologic Cytology: Recommendations for Best Practices

Your PC

The webinar will feature Jennifer A Brainard, M.D., Section Head, Cytopathology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio
More information
Register

Available for 6 months after subscribing

Quality Assessment Center (QAC) Document Control for Cytopathology Workbench

Your PC

Details

Available for 6 months after subscribing

Quality Assessment Center (QAC)
The LEAN Cytopathology Laboratory Workbench

Your PC

Details


INDUSTRY NEWS


Researchers tie increased throat cancer cases to HPV infection
HealthDay News
The sexually transmitted human papillomavirus may be behind the sharp rise in cases of throat and mouth cancers among young American adults, researchers say. In a new study, investigators from Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit analyzed U.S. government data and found that cancers of the base of the tongue, tonsils, soft palate and pharynx among adults aged 45 and younger increased 60 percent between 1973 and 2009.
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Even health-conscious women get surprised by ovarian cancer
Omaha World-Herald
Ovarian cancer sneaks up on many women because symptoms, especially early in the disease, are vague and not intense. And there's no screening test for the disease. By the time most cases are identified, ovarian cancer is in an advanced stage, when 5-year survival rates are low.
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Mexican scientists reveal aflatoxins relationship with cervical, liver cancer
National Award in Food Science and Technology via The Medical News
Mexican scientists identified and quantified the amount of aflatoxins (carcinogenic) in food such as corn tortilla, rice, chili pepper, processed sauces, chicken breast and eggs and revealed its relationship with cervical and liver cancer in humans. The research explains that both types of cancer can be originated by the ingestion of food contaminated with aflatoxins produced by the fungi Aspergilus flavus and A. parasiticus.
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Laos HPV vaccine campaign aims to curb cervical cancer
Voice of America
One of the world's leading immunization groups is launching a new program aimed at vaccinating girls in Laos against human papillomavirus to curb rising rates of cervical cancer. The Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization said developing countries in South East Asia, such as Laos and Burma, still face major challenges in implementing vaccination programs.
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Survival higher with brachytherapy for cervical cancer but use declines in US
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Brachytherapy treatment was found to be associated with better cause-specific survival and overall survival in women with cervical cancer in a new study. The population-based analysis also revealed geographic disparities and a decline in brachytherapy treatment in the United States.
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MORE NEWS


Government shutdown to impact science
The Scientist
Because legislators in Congress failed to pass a temporary 2014 spending bill, the U.S. government is officially "shut down" for the first time in 17 years. Furloughs triggered by the shutdown apply to most federal scientists, except those involved in patient or animal care. But the effects of the shutdown might also trickle down to academic researchers, many of whom are funded through grants administered by the National Institutes of Health and National Science Foundation.
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Inspired by human eye, imaging system detects disease, hazardous substances
R&D Magazine
For hundreds of years, optical devices like telescopes and microscopes have relied on solid lenses that slide up and down to magnify and to focus. To tune how much light is received, conventional devices use mechanical contraptions like the blades that form the adjustable aperture in cameras. To meet demands for ever smaller imaging systems, researchers are working to create entirely unconventional ways of focusing light.
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Oncologists call for industry-led global fund to fight cancer
Reuters
The world faces a rapidly growing burden of cancer that will overwhelm governments unless the medical and pharma industry takes the lead on a multi-billion dollar private-public fund, oncologists said. In a report on how rates of cancer diagnosis and death are rising across the world while access to diagnosis and treatment is extremely patchy, experts described the economics of the problem as daunting and current financing models as broken.
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Stanford scientists build a microscope to spot the seeds of cancer
Stanford Report
The rule of thumb with cancer is that the earlier you can detect the disease, the more effective the treatment, and hence better potential outcomes. Now, a team of engineers, scientists, and doctors from Stanford is developing a mini-microscope that might be able to noninvasively detect the CTCs earlier than ever, allowing for earlier interventions.
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ASCT Viewpoint
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Bob Kowalski, Content Editor, 469.420.2650   
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