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Genomic differences observed in cervical cancer subtypes
Healio
The two most common subtypes of cervical cancer harbor high rates of potentially targetable oncogenic mutations, study results suggest. Because cervical adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinoma feature distinct molecular profiles, personalized treatment strategies could significantly improve outcomes, researchers say.
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ASCT 2013 Wage and Employment Survey Results
American Society for Cytotechnology
ASCT Members will be receiving a link to the ASCT 2013 Wage and Employment Survey Results in the November issue of the Voice. Here are a few highlights from The Survey: of the 319 responders, 45 percent were Staff Cytotechnologists with a mean annualized salary of $67,450. At the top of the range were Anatomic Pathology Managers ($88,155) and Cytology Managers ($81,728). Comparing average salaries reported for the current year and the previous year indicates an average increase of 3.07 percent. The results will also be posted on the ASCT website, www.ASCT.com.
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INDUSTRY NEWS


Weighing surgeries in light of a breast cancer gene
The New York Times
When Tracy Dunbrook, a bioethicist in Sherman, Conn., tested positive for the BRCA gene mutation, she was told she had a 40 to 60 percent chance of developing ovarian cancer in her lifetime. Doctors advised her to have her ovaries removed. She considered going further and having a hysterectomy, but in the end she opted for the standard of care: a procedure known as risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy, removal of her ovaries and fallopian tubes. Five years later, she was given a diagnosis of Stage 3 uterine cancer.
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Not all vaccines are equal: Why some won't get HPV vaccination
Science 2.0
Girls in minority groups and low-income families, who are claimed to be most at risk for cervical cancer, are less likely to get the human papillomavirus vaccine. Scholars from the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Children's Hospital Colorado interviewed 41 low-income parents of girls ages 12-15 to determine why they didn't get the vaccine or finish the course. The survey interviewed both English and Spanish speakers. Result: English-speaking parents expressed concerns over the need and safety of the vaccine, while Spanish-speaking parents said healthcare providers failed to explain that they needed three shots to be fully immunized. They also feared the vaccine would encourage sexual activity.
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Research explores suspicions about sexual promiscuity, vaccine safety
The Medical News
Suspicions about sexual promiscuity and vaccine safety are explored in an article in the November issue of the journal Preventive Medicine, which dedicates a section of that issue to research concerning the human papillomavirus.
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Governments failing to use evidence-based strategies for vaccine acceptance
Vaccine News Daily
The greatest threat to the acceptance of childhood vaccines may be the failure of governments to use evidence-based strategies to avoid threats to the science communication environment, according to a recent article in Science.
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MORE NEWS


Why is no one on the first treatment to prevent HIV?
The New Yorker
According to Dawn Smith, a biomedical interventions implementation officer in the Centers for Disease Control's epidemiology branch, at least half a million Americans are good candidates for pre-exposure prophylaxis treatment — meaning that they are at high risk for contracting HIV through sexual activity — yet only a few thousand Americans are receiving the treatment, which could reduce the risk of contracting HIV by more than ninety percent.
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New guidelines issued on job-related HIV exposure
Infectious Disease Special Edition
The United States Public Health Service has released new guidelines on the management of occupational exposures to HIV and postexposure prophylaxis. Updated for the first time since 2005, the new guidelines include several important changes, most notably a recommendation that PEP regimens contain three or more antiretroviral drugs, as opposed to the two or three previously recommended, and that the regimen make use of newer, better tolerated medications.
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Blood pressure drug may enhance cancer treatment
Medical News Today
A new study reveals that a common class of drug used to control high blood pressure could enhance cancer treatment by improving delivery of chemotherapy drugs and oxygen through tumors. Writing about their work in the online journal Nature Communications, researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital, an affiliate of Harvard Medical School, describe how the angiotensin inhibitor losartan increased blood flow and improved chemotherapy drug outcomes in mice with breast and pancreatic cancer.
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Lab professionals can help providers meet Meaningful Use Stage 2 objectives
ADVANCE for Administrators of the Laboratory
Laboratory professionals are well-versed in how lab analyses are performed, how test results are reported, and the interpretation of test results, in providing quality patient care.
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Efforts to reduce waste in healthcare leads to job loss for many
By Pamela Lewis Dolan
Job reports indicate hospitals and health systems are laying people off in quantities not seen since 2009. But the news should not be viewed as a cut in services. Rather, an effort to improve efficiencies and reduce waste, industry insiders say. For the third time in five months, the healthcare sector announced the most job cuts of any other industry, according to a recent layoff report prepared by the Chicago-based outplacement firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas.
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ASCT Viewpoint
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Bob Kowalski, Content Editor, 469.420.2650   
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