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Are Japanese mushrooms the cure for HPV?
Fox News
Currently there is no effective treatment for HPV, but researchers from the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School said they may have uncovered a way to eliminate the virus — and they have found it in mushrooms. In the study, 10 HPV-positive women were treated orally with the Japanese mushroom extract active hexose correlated compound (AHCC) once daily for six months. Five achieved a negative HPV test result — three with confirmed eradication after stopping AHCC. The remaining two responders are continuing to participate in the ongoing study.
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ASCT Services announces contract awards
ASCT
ASCT Services, Inc. is proud to announce that the Centers for Disease Detection and Prevention (CDC) has exercised option year one of its contract with ASCT Services to continue to conduct a Study for Cytology Workload Assessment and Measure through September 2015.

Also, ASCT Services, Inc. has been awarded an eighth consecutive contract with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to conduct surveys for the review of "Cytology Testing in Laboratories under the Clinical Laboratories Improvement Amendments (CLIA)."

For more information, click the links below to view the full announcements.

CDC Contract Announcement
CMS Contract Announcement

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INDUSTRY NEWS


11 percent not checked for cervical cancer in 5 years
HealthDay via WebMD
An estimated eight million American women ages 21 to 65 haven't been screened for cervical cancer in the past five years. That's the finding of a federal report that noted that more than half of cervical cancer cases occur among women who've never or rarely been screened. In 2012, about 11 percent (eight million) women ages 21 to 65 said they had not been screened for cervical cancer in the past five years.
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The HPV vaccine's power to prevent cancer
U.S. News & World Report
The human papillomavirus vaccine, commonly known by its commercial names, Gardasil and Cervarix, is best known for protecting against cervical cancer in women. Lesser known is that it also protects against anal, penile and oropharyngeal cancers, the latter of which is one of the fastest growing cancers in the U.S. And the incidence in men is twice that of women.
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National Cancer Institute supports next-generation Austrian HPV vaccine
Medical Xpress
The National Cancer Institute in the U.S. is supporting the new vaccine developed at the MedUni Vienna against the human papillomavirus with at least $3.5 million. This is a major success for the developers and means that the foundations can now be laid for the clinical trials needed for licensing as a vaccine.
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Experimental drug may help fight cervical cancer
News Medical
In Europe, patients with recurrent or secondary cancer have a low chance of survival, with only 20-30 percent experiencing tumor shrinkage after conventional chemotherapy and life expectancy being diagnosed as less than one year for many. A Cancer Research U.K.-funded study led by researchers at the University of Leicester, with key collaborators from the Universities of Glasgow, Manchester and Edinburgh, has discovered that adding the investigational agent cediranib, which has been developed by AstraZeneca, to standard chemotherapy may be beneficial for patients with metastatic or recurrent cervical cancer and could pave the way for future treatment of the disease.
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MORE NEWS


How technology can help contain an outbreak
By Jared Hill
Hollywood has trained most of us to envision what happens during an epidemic. We see the first case of a disease, which seems innocuous to the people in the film. Then it spreads with increasing velocity, until it almost outpaces or completely overwhelms the systems in place to prevent it. In real life, however, disease control experts have fended off quite a few potentially disastrous contagious diseases — often with cutting-edge technology. As humankind continues to face inevitable outbreaks like the current Ebola epidemic in West Africa, technology will play an increasingly important role in prevention.
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Kidney condition adds morbidity in cervical cancer
Cancer Network
Hydronephrosis is associated with substantial morbidity in patients with cervical cancer, and is potentially associated with poorer survival as well, according to a new study. Hydronephrosis, essentially a swelling of the kidney, develops when a blockage in the renal collecting system results in distention of renal calyces.
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Gargling with gold nanoparticles provides non-invasive way to diagnose cancer
Dark Daily
Researchers in Israel developed a non-invasive oral test for cancers of the tongue and larynx that uses gold nanoparticles and antibodies to "paint" cancer cells. An imaging tool then allows physicians to identify any tumor cells that may be present. This demonstration of how the combination of gold nanoparticles and antibodies can detect cancer may form the basis for a new approach that enables in vitro diagnostics manufacturers and pathologists to develop medical laboratory tests that can non-invasively identify different types of cancers.
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ASCT Viewpoint
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Esther Cho, Content Editor, 469.420.2671   
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