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Disparities in cervical cancer show education is still needed
By Jessica Taylor
The Affordable Care Act requires health insurers to provide all cancer screenings for free, with no charge to the patient. If this is the case, why are a majority of women still not getting screened for cervical cancer? The American Cancer Society estimates that 12,360 new cases of invasive cervical cancer will be diagnosed and 4,020 women will die from cervical cancer this year. A recent study from the Centers for Disease and Control Prevention showed that more than half of women diagnosed with cervical cancer had never or rarely been screened.
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Announcing the 2015 INCCA volunteer schedule
INCCA
Interested in a volunteer vacation to the Inca highlands and the majesty of the Andes? The INCCA sponsors yearly pathology missions to the CerviCusco women's clinic in Cusco, Peru. Peru has one of the highest rates of cervical cancer in the world and it is estimated that only 30 percent of Peruvian women have had a single Pap. This is an opportunity to provide cervical cancer screening services to women in Cusco and nearby Andean villages. Cytology volunteers prepare and screen Paps for the clinic. Colposcopy, VIA, cryo and LEEP are provided by on-site clinician volunteers. The INCCA is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and participation is eligible as a tax deductible expense. Family and friends are welcome as "helping hands." Sightseeing tours to the nearby Sacred Valley and Machu Picchu are available on the weekends.

The 2015 INCCA Mission to Cusco, Peru will be scheduled for the following weeks:

Week 1 – April 20-24
Week 2 – June 22-26
Week 3 – Aug. 24-28
Week 4 – Oct. 12-16


For more information, visit www.cervicusco.org and Facebook at "theincca."

If you are interested in a rewarding experience in one of the world's most beautiful places, please contact Dr. Barbara Winkler at bwinkler@mkmg.com.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Scientists develop new way to treat HPV-related cancer
TIME
A drug called cidofovir that's already used to target viruses could also be used as part of a novel way to treat cervical cancer. In new research presented at an annual Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics in Barcelona, Spain, researchers tested cidofovir in tandem with chemotherapy and found that the drug caused shrinkage of cervical cancer tumors in all of the trial participants, and in 80 percent of the patients the tumors disappeared completely. The combination also showed no toxic side effects.
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Study: When cervical cancer is common, HPV vaccination usually isn't
Los Angeles Times
Rates of cervical cancer vary substantially from state to state, and health experts hoped that the HPV vaccine would help even them out. But new research shows that hasn't happened — at least not so far. As of 2012, some of the states with the highest incidence of cervical cancer also did the worst job of vaccinating girls against human papillomavirus, the virus that can lead to cervical cancer, according to a study presented at a health disparities conference organized by the American Association for Cancer Research.
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More HPV legislation may not result in greater HPV vaccine uptake
Infection Control Today
The presence of legislation that encourages HPV vaccine uptake does not correlate with increased vaccination among young men or women, according to new research to be presented at APHA's 142nd annual meeting. According to the findings, between 2010 and 2012, on average 27 percent of adolescents initiated the HPV vaccine and 37 percent received a recommendation for the vaccine from their primary care provider in states with no history of HPV legislation.
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MORE NEWS


As Ebola scare dies down in US, infectious disease preparations wane
Los Angeles Times
As nationwide alarm over Ebola begins to fade, hospital officials and public health professionals are trying to ensure that lessons learned don't disappear along with it. After a Liberian man carrying the disease died in a hospital in Dallas and two of his nurses became infected, facilities stepped up training and planning for Ebola cases.
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Changing the culture to one of safety
Laboratory Equipment
The frequency of both serious and fatal lab accidents in academic chemistry labs in the past few years has become increasingly alarming. Recent high-profile incidents have thrust lab safety into the mainstream spotlight, and have illustrated the fact that many current university safety guidelines and systems are inadequate. Both the National Research Council and U.S. government have responded to the crisis — one with a report and recommended action steps, and the other with a new policy to take effect September 2015.
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'Dishing' out a new test to improve breast cancer treatment
By Dorothy L. Tengler
Early detection of breast cancer by mammography leads to a range of treatment options, including less-extensive surgery and the use of chemotherapy with fewer serious side effects — or even, in some cases, the option to forgo chemotherapy. But often, chemotherapy is the best option. But, in more than 100,000 cases each year, the breast cancers never respond to the standard drugs, either initially or after repeated doses. New on the horizon is "tumor in a dish," a new technology that may change the harsh reality of chemotherapy treatment.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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