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As 2013 comes to a close, ASCT would like to wish its members, partners and other industry professionals a safe and happy holiday season.
As we reflect on the past year for the industry, we would like to provide the readers of Viewpoint a look at the most accessed articles from the year.

Our regular publication will resume Jan. 8.


Less frequent Pap smears may miss cancer precursors
Reuters via Fox News
From March 13: Certain types of cervical abnormalities that can lead to cancer may be missed when young women go years between Pap smears, a new study suggests. Dr. Lisa Barroilhet, from the University of Wisconsin Hospital in Madison, and her colleagues reviewed the records of 242 women with adenocarcinoma in situ, or AIS — cervical abnormalities that can lead to adenocarcinoma, one form of cervical cancer.
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Jan. 15, 2 p.m. ET Effective Communication in the Cytology Laboratory Your PC The webinar will feature Lois Rockson, MPH, MAEd, SCT (ASCP), CMIAC, assistant professor, Rutgers School of Health Related Professions Cytotechnology Program
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Feb. 12, 2 p.m. ET Cytopathology of Soft Tissue: A Practical Approach Your PC The webinar will feature Liron Pantanowitz. M.D., associate professor of Pathology, director of FNA Clinic, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh
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Ethical questions linger in cervical cancer study
The Arizona Republic via USA Today
From Sept. 11: Researchers found that a simple test had cut the rate of death from cervical cancer, but the study included a control group in which women were monitored but not screened or routinely treated.
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Canadian ob-gyn groups: 25 is too late to start testing for cervical cancer
The Canadian Press via CTV
From Feb. 27: The Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Canada and two related medical organizations are taking issue with a national task force's recommendations that women wait until age 25 to start cervical cancer screening. In a newly released position paper, the SOGC, the Society of Gynecologic Oncology and the Society of Canadian Colposcopists say age 25 is too late to begin Pap testing because precancerous and cancerous lesions may have developed earlier in some women.
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Why is HPV so expensive to treat?
Slate
From March 13: Most strains of HPV clear from the body safely within a couple of years. Routine checkups catch aggressive forms of the virus early. So why does it cost so much to treat HPV? Part of it is the sheer will of the virus — HPV is the most common of those 20 million STIs. But it's also because, as costly as treatment is, prevention isn't cheap, either.
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Some cancers linked to HPV on the rise
The New York Times
From Jan. 23: A consortium of research institutions reports that while cancer death rates have continued to decline since the 1990s, the incidence of some cancers associated with human papillomavirus, or HPV, has increased. A survey, published recently in The Journal of the National Cancer Institute, found that incidences or death rates of lung, colorectal, breast and prostate cancers have decreased. But oropharyngeal, anal and vulvar cancers, all associated with HPV infection, have increased.
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Vinegar holds promise for cervical cancer screening
Contemporary OB/GYN
From June 12: A test for cervical cancer that uses ordinary vinegar — and that can be performed by trained laypersons — holds promise for poor countries where cytology-based screening is not easily implemented. This low-cost, innovative solution to a pressing women's health problem was presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago.
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Agreement on use of information from 61-year-old cervical cancer cells sets new ethical privacy standards
Dark Daily
From Sept. 25: Patient privacy rights involving genetic information has gone to a new level. Pathologists and clinical laboratory managers will want to understand the legal precedents and new standards established in an unprecedented agreement between the family of a woman who died in 1951 and the growing research establishment studying her cervical cancer cells following her death.
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Technology may find ovarian cancer cells at an earlier stage
Chicago Tribune
From May 22: New technology for identifying early stage ovarian cancer in uterine and cervical cells could have the potential to one day stem this often deadly disease, according to a recent study in the International Journal of Cancer. Using equipment that can carry out nanocytology — a technique that identifies cells at the nanoscale, or one billionth of a meter, much smaller than typical microscopy can detect — researchers were able to find ovarian cancerous cells that were invisible using a conventional microscope.
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Genomic differences observed in cervical cancer subtypes
Healio
From Oct. 23: The two most common subtypes of cervical cancer harbor high rates of potentially targetable oncogenic mutations, study results suggest. Because cervical adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinoma feature distinct molecular profiles, personalized treatment strategies could significantly improve outcomes, researchers say.
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Worried parents balk at HPV vaccine for daughters
NPR
From March 27: More parents are worried about getting their daughters vaccinated against cervical cancer, despite more doctors saying the shots are a good idea. Over a three-year period ending in 2010, concerns about side effects more than tripled to 16 percent from about 5 percent among parents who didn't intend to get their teenage daughters vaccinated, according to a study published online by the journal Pediatrics.
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ASCT Viewpoint
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Bob Kowalski, Content Editor, 469.420.2650   
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