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Old age alone should not prevent kidney transplants
Renal & Urology News
Elderly individuals should not be disqualified as kidney transplant recipients solely on the basis of age, researchers reported at the 28th annual congress of the European Association Urology. Dr. Niall J. Dempster and colleagues in the Department of Surgery and Transplantation at Western Infirmary in Glasgow, U.K., reviewed data from 762 renal transplants performed from January 2001 to December 2010. They compared the rate of delayed graft function (DGF) and biopsy-proven acute rejection (BPAR), and other outcomes among elderly patients (older than 65 years) with those among younger patients.
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SOCIETY NEWS


One week left to guarantee ATC member rate!
ASTS
To register for the American Transplant Congress at member rates, you must pay your ASTS membership dues by April 1, 2013. You should have received an invoice at the end of last year; if you have questions, email asts@asts.org.
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ASTS Events at ATC
ASTS
If you are planning to attend the American Transplant Congress in Seattle May 18–22, don't forget these ASTS events:

  • Presentation of the Pioneer Award at 10 a.m. on Sunday, May 19, to Ronald Busuttil, MD, PhD
  • Presentation of the ASTS research grants at 9:15 a.m. on Tuesday, May 21
  • ASTS Presidential Address at 9:30 a.m. on Tuesday, May 21
  • ASTS Business Meeting at 5:45 p.m. Tuesday, May 21 (members only), followed by the ASTS Member Reception at 7:00 p.m.

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HOPE Act Passed by Senate Committee
ASTS
The Senate Health, Education, Labor & Pensions (HELP) Committee has passed the HOPE Act (HIV Organ Policy Equity Act), legislation that would end the federal ban on research into organ donations from HIV-positive donors to HIV-positive recipients. The bipartisan measure introduced by U.S. Senators Barbara Boxer (D-CA) and Tom Coburn (R-OK) – which is also sponsored by Senators Tammy Baldwin (D-WI), Rand Paul (R-KY), Michael Enzi (R-WY), Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), Richard Burr (R-NC) and Mark Kirk (R-IL) – would open a pathway to the eventual transplantation of these organs, offering hope to thousands of HIV-positive patients who are on waiting lists for life-saving organs. Currently, even researching the feasibility of such transplants is banned under federal law.
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TOP NEWS


Coronary events in patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation: Perioperative evaluation and management
Clinical Transplantation (subscription required)
Patients with advanced liver disease have a high prevalence of cardiac risk factors. The stress of liver transplant surgery predisposes these patients to major cardiac events, such as myocardial infarction or ventricular arrhythmias in addition to heart failure exacerbation. Thorough screening and optimal management of underlying cardiovascular pathology and cardiovascular risk factors should decrease the incidence of new cardiac events in liver transplant recipients.
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Rabies death linked to organ transplant
MedPage Today (subscription required)
Three transplant recipients who got organs from the same donor are getting rabies shots after a fourth died of the disease more than a year after the transplant, the CDC reported.
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Risk of waitlist mortality in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and bacterial cholangitis
Liver Transplantation (subscription required)
Patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) are at increased risk for bacterial cholangitis because of biliary strictures and bile stasis. A subset of PSC patients suffer from repeated episodes of bacterial cholangitis, which can lead to frequent hospitalizations and impaired quality of life. Although waitlist candidates with PSC and bacterial cholangitis frequently receive exception points and/or are referred for living donor transplantation, the impact of bacterial cholangitis on waitlist mortality is unknown.
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The use of extracorporeal membranous oxygenation in donors after cardiac death
Current Opinion in Organ Transplantation (subscription required)
The use of ECMO in donors after cardio-circulatory death should be encouraged and further developed. Experimental work is in progress to better define the optimal conditions of the technique, which will help to limit or even repair the injuries, induced by warm ischaemia.
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Quality assessment and performance improvement in transplantation: Hype or hope?
Current Opinion in Organ Transplantation (subscription required)
Healthcare reform and the national quality strategy is increasingly impacting transplant practice, as exemplified by quality assessment and performance improvement (QAPI) regulations for pretransplant and posttransplant care. Transplant providers consider not just patient comorbidities, donor quality and business constraints, but also regulatory mandates when deciding how to care for transplant candidates and recipients. This review describes transplant quality oversight agencies and regulations, and explores recent literature on the pros and cons of transplant QAPI.
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'Warmed liver' transplant first
BBC News
Surgeons in London have carried out the first 'warm liver' transplant using an organ which was 'kept alive' at body temperature in a machine. Usually donor livers are kept on ice, but many become damaged as a result. The patient, 62-year-old Ian Christie from Devon, is doing well after the operation at King's College Hospital. The technology was developed by scientists at Oxford University who hope it could increase the number of livers available for transplant.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed our previous issues? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Kidney transplant chains boost benefit of nondirected donors (Renal & Urology News)
Donor kidney volume predicts graft survival (Renal & Urology News)
New Jersey lawmakers: Don't kick medical marijuana users off organ transplant lists (ThinkProgress)
Importance of the temporary portocaval shunt during adult living donor liver transplantation (Liver Transplantation)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

ASTS NewsBrief
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Tammy Gibson, Content Editor, 469.420.2677   
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