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ASD Professional Development
Dr. Ernsperger, BCBA-D

Practical Strategies for Teaching Students with ASD with immediate implementation in the classroom. Please contact
Dr. Lori at drlori@cox.net,
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CASE News

Monday, Feb. 11 — Take action day
CASE
Though Congress was able to avoid sending us over the Fiscal Cliff by the grace of an 11th hour, New Year's decision, the dramatic consequences of sequestration were merely postponed. As it stands, the March budget process will include a 5.1 percent across the board cut to education programs that help students with disabilities, their families and the professionals who work with them. Education and the other programs facing cuts would not only dramatically impact students with disabilities, but students and families from low-income backgrounds as well. In our current financial crisis, sequestration represents a dereliction of our duty to those who rely on these programs to level a fundamentally unequal playing field.

We have another opportunity to try to stop the hemorrhage of funds from education and other family/child programs by taking action today Monday, Feb. 11. The CEC Policy and Advocacy Department have developed some GREAT resources for you to use today: One Page Take Action Directions; an OP ED piece; and a poster. After you have taken action, please send this urgent request to not just CASE members but anyone who is willing to use their voice to help stop Congress from cutting education and other necessary programs.

Take these materials and "personalize" as much as you can ... use all of the formats so the message is received in many ways. Let's be united in this request.
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CASE Night
CASE
CASE Night April 4 in San Antonio ... Tickets ($65) are now on sale on the CASE Website, www.casecec.org. If you are going to CEC be sure to get your ticket for this wonderful evening of Texas Adventures. We will be doing an afterhours tour of the Alamo — and then move over to the historic St. Anthony's Hotel to have appetizers, hear a Jazz band and have dinner. After dinner we will have a DJ and a Line Dance Instructor help us dance the night away. Remember, CASE Night typically sells out so get your tickets now.

There is still room for a few more at our Winter Hybrid Conference in Orlando, Fla., and lots of room for more Virtual Sites ... see below for more information.

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Special Education Law Symposium
CASE
Designed for a national audience, this intensive one-week, well-balanced program is available on both a noncredit and graduate-credit basis and provides a thorough analysis of the leading issues under the IDEA and Section 504. Among the 19 symposium sessions are the following "hot topics": RTI; discipline, including a mock manifestation determination hearing;child find; transitional services; tuition reimbursement and other remedies; disability-­related bullying; and autism.
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Have you registered for the CASE Winter Hybrid Conference yet?
CASE
The theme is Evolution, Re-invention or Revolution: The Future of Special Education, Feb. 13-15 in Orlando, Fla. With some of the great minds in education this interactive professional development will be a wonderful opportunity for team building and truly being a part of defining the field for years to come. The Rosen Plaza is a wonderful location — just minutes from so much of the best of Orlando — and the price of $117 is phenomenal. We will have 3 days with a different emphasis each day: Virtual Education and implications for Special Education, The Re-invention of Special Education and The Evolution of Special Education. Click here for a copy of the agenda.

But, wait ... If you can't travel, why not have your own mini conference. You pay one registration fee and then have as many people as you wish to participate with you — what a really great way to build teams. We have even made up a set of HINTS for you to use to get you started. We will even provide a flyer for you to customize to publicize your event. As part of the CASE strategic plan, our goal is to get the best information out to the most people. Go to the CASE website for more information, or contact Gary Myrah, CASE professional development chair at garymyrah@wcass.org.

Daily Themes:
  • Applying Virtual Education
  • Integrated Education for ALL
  • Re-Inventing/Re-Booting SPED
Featuring:
  • Virtual Education: Jeff Jacobson, Matt Wicks, Bennett Rodick and Andy Morrison
  • MTSS: Drs. George Batsche, Judy Elliott and Neil Guthrie
  • SPED Evolved: Drs. Steve Kukic, Melody Musgrove and Alexa Posny

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Center on Online Learning
CASE
Online learning programs for K-12 students are enjoying rapid growth nationwide, but there is little understanding of the effectiveness of these programs for students with disabilities. Recognizing the need for research in this area, the Office of Special Education Programs within the U.S. Department of Education created the Center on Online Learning and Students with Disabilities one year ago. The Center aims to improve the accessibility and engagement of K-12 online learning for students with disabilities through a focus on learner variability.
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READ180

READ 180 is a comprehensive system of curriculum, instruction, assessment, and professional development proven to raise reading achievement for struggling readers in grades 4–12+. Designed for any student reading two or more years below grade-level, READ 180 leverages adaptive technology to individualize instruction for students and provide powerful data for differentiation to teachers. READ 180 helps target the specific skill deficits and unique instructional needs outlined in a student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP). Learn More


CEC Policy Insider


'We are all on the same team': Feds issue guidance on including students with disabilities in school athletic programs
CEC Policy Insider
The Office of Civil Rights within the U.S. Department of Education released detailed guidance outlining how public schools and school districts should comply with existing laws to ensure that students with disabilities have an equal opportunity to participate in extracurricular athletic programs.
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U.S. Department of Education's Michael Yudin attends 2013 Special Olympics in South Korea
CEC Policy Insider
On Jan. 29, the 2013 Special Olympics Winter Games began in South Korea with over 2,300 athletes competing in traditional Winter Olympic games such as figure skating, speed skating, snowboarding and Alpine skiing. Speakers and attendees include Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi from Burma and President Joyce Banda from Malawi, who discussed in their addresses the social barriers faced by those with disabilities and breaking the cycle of poverty and discrimination that they and their families face.
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Apply now: U.S. Department of Education announces 2 new grant opportunities
CEC Policy Insider
The U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services has announced two new grant competitions for funds to be used in fiscal year 2013.
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Speak out on behalf of special and gifted education — Share your story with CEC
CEC Policy Insider
Every year, CEC publishes the Federal Outlook for Exceptional Children, providing an overview of federally-funded programs — IDEA and Javits grants — that impact the lives of children and youth with disabilities and/or gifts and talents. The Outlook is distributed to members of Congress, federal agencies and other leaders in the education community with the hope that a better understanding of such programs will lead to increased federal funding for special/gifted education programs.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TOP TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
8 things to know about dyslexia
NBC News
Dr. Joseph Sirven, a contributor for NBC News, writes: "My parents instilled in me the value of education in providing opportunities in life. As a doctor, preventing and solving medical problems that can disrupt education at an early age is something I believe we both as individuals and as members of the Latino community must address. Dyslexia is one of the most common learning disorders that can lead to problems with education, but if identified early, academic concerns can be potentially averted. Here are 8 things you need to know about this condition."

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Steep cuts to special education, disability programs loom
Disability Scoop
The White House is warning that special education will face more than $1 billion in cuts and millions more will be trimmed from other federal programs for people with disabilities next year unless lawmakers act. In a report sent to Congress, the Obama administration painted a stark picture of what's to come, detailing the impact of more than $100 billion in automatic spending cuts that are scheduled to take effect Jan. 2.

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After criticism, DSM Committee changes course
Disability Scoop
Experts behind the new version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders didn't back down on major changes to the definition of autism, but appear to have made an about-face when it comes to intellectual disability. Initial plans to revise the diagnosis of "mental retardation" in the forthcoming fifth edition of the psychiatric manual called for the condition to be renamed "intellectual developmental disorder." Critics blasted the proposal because it was inconsistent with the more commonly accepted term "intellectual disability" which has already been adopted in many federal and state laws.

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Hot Topics


8 things to know about dyslexia
NBC News
Dr. Joseph Sirven, a contributor for NBC News, writes: "My parents instilled in me the value of education in providing opportunities in life. As a doctor, preventing and solving medical problems that can disrupt education at an early age is something I believe we both as individuals and as members of the Latino community must address. Dyslexia is one of the most common learning disorders that can lead to problems with education, but if identified early, academic concerns can be potentially averted. Here are 8 things you need to know about this condition."
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Nondrug ADHD treatments don't pan out in study
HealthDay News
Many parents pursue costly and time-consuming treatments to help their children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Now, a new study finds little evidence that nondrug interventions reduce key symptoms of ADHD. A multinational team of experts identified no positive effects from psychological treatments including mind exercises (cognitive training), neurofeedback and behavioral training (positive reinforcement). And the researchers discovered only small benefits associated with dietary treatments: supplementation with omega-3 and omega-6 free fatty acids, and elimination of artificial food coloring.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    After criticism, DSM Committee changes course (Disability Scoop)
White House: Schools must open sports to disabled (USA Today)
Rubio calls for education reforms to focus on closing 'skills gap' (The Hill)
Advocates want school using shock therapy defunded (Disability Scoop)
Overcoming impact of adversity on learning (Education Week)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Autism speaks through gene expression
Biophysical Society via Science Daily
Understanding the altered genetic pathways is critical for diagnosis and treatment of autism spectrum disorders with symptoms ranging from mild personality traits to severe intellectual disability and seizures. New work to examine which genes are responsible for autism disorders will be presented at the 57th Annual Meeting of the Biophysical Society, held Feb. 2-6 in Philadelphia.
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Students with autism lean towards STEM majors
CBS News
A study has found that students with autism chose majors in science, technology, engineering and math — the so-called STEM majors — at higher rates than students without the condition. The findings highlight an often overlooked segment of the population, and could be good news for a nation struggling to increase its levels of hard science expertise.
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Taylor Washington case shows there's no easy answers on learning disabilities
The Journal News
The miseducation of Taylor Washington, who made it all the way through to college without being able to read, is dramatic but likely not rare. Washington, a Somers soccer standout courted by a slew of Division I schools, was passed along through well-respected public schools, and made it through standout private schools. He was called brilliant by one teacher, lazy by another. In college, after nearly flunking out, he was finally diagnosed with dyslexia.
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  PRODUCT SHOWCASES
Student's Ambition Sparked by
Academy of READING
Academy of READING provides an individualized approach to developing foundation skills. This CASE-endorsed online intervention program targets critical skill gaps and helps students make fast, permanent gains in reading proficiency. Watch this video to hear a student and his mother discuss how Academy of READING impacted his life.
SRA Reading Laboratory 2.0
Digital
• Any device anytime,   anywhere
• More than 85% new content

Interactive
• Motivating short reads with   text dependent questions
• Simple Management tools   for teachers

Personalized
• Improve students' Lexile®   scores with access to   complex text
• Informational and literary   text based on their interests
• Reports on Lexile® level,   student progress, standards,   and fluency
AutismPro
AutismPro provides online tools to help school districts meet state compliance and due process requirements in supporting students with Autism and Related Disorders. It's a comprehensive suite of professional development and case management resources for educators and professionals working with students with ASDs.


Legislation


US states, local governments plead for new 'No Child Left Behind'
Reuters
U.S. state and local officials again called on Congress to pass renewed "No Child Left Behind" education legislation, writing in a letter on Tuesday that it must become "a top priority for every member of the House and Senate." Nearly a year ago — on Feb. 6, 2012 — the same groups, including the National Governors Association, the U.S. Conference of Mayors and the National School Boards Association, made a similar plea to reauthorize the federal education funding law.
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No Child Left Behind: Early lessons from state flexibility waivers
U.S. Department of Education
Testimony of Secretary of Education Arne Duncan to the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions: "Chairman Harkin, Ranking Member Alexander, and Members of the Committee. Thank you for inviting me here today to testify on the flexibility that the Department of Education has provided under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to empower States, districts, and schools to move forward with reforms that benefit all students. I say that we have provided flexibility under the law to States, which is true, but the guiding principle of ESEA flexibility is that it is for students."
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New Mexico may face loss of federal special education funds
Education Week
A New Mexico newspaper is reporting that the state could be docked up to $93 million in federal special education funding because it made reductions to the program without U.S. Department of Education approval. The state is facing a penalty because it did not follow a rule known in federal funding circles as "maintenance of state financial support." Normally, states can only keep special education funding level or increase that funding from year to year. But in the depths of the recent recession, several states asked for permission to make temporary cuts because state revenues were falling off. The Education Department granted waivers in some cases, but those that did not get a waiver put their federal special education dollars at risk.
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Federal autism panel to increase focus on services
Disability Scoop
With an "overwhelming" volume of autism research being produced, a federal advisory panel says that significant strides are being made in understanding the disorder, but serious gaps persist. In a report, the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee — a federal advisory panel comprised of government officials and members of the autism community — outlined progress made in the last two years. Specifically, the group highlighted new autism prevalence numbers, better information about co-occurring conditions like gastrointestinal issues and sleep problems as well as evidence that brain changes accompany behavioral improvements as some of the most remarkable advances.
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In the News


Survey: School bullies often popular
HealthDay News
Middle school students who bully are often the most popular, a new study has found. And the results were the same whether it was boys or girls who spread rumors, started fights or pushed other students around. For the study, researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles, surveyed nearly 1,900 students in 99 classes at 11 Los Angeles middle schools. The surveys, conducted at different points during grades 7 and 8, asked the participants to name the students who were considered the "coolest" and the ones who were bullies.
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Study: States lack data on principals
Education Week
While principals increasingly are moving to center stage in national debates over school improvement, a new study finds most states have little or no information about how their principals are prepared, licensed, supported and evaluated. The Dallas-based George W. Bush Institute was expected to release an analysis of all 50 states' principal policies and related data collections in Washington. It finds that even states with otherwise comprehensive longitudinal-data systems collect limited information about principals, particularly on their preparation.
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How are Race to the Top states doing in year 2?
ED.gov Blog
In only two years, the 12 states with Race to the Top grants continue to show improvements in teaching and learning in their schools. The U.S. Department of Education released state-specific reports for the 12 Race to the Top states, providing detailed, transparent summaries of each state's accomplishments and challenges in year two, which covered the 2011-2012 school year.
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Educators embrace digital learning strategies
MindShift
The second annual Digital Learning Day was designated to bring attention to the benefits of technology for learning. As part of the effort, PBS LearningMedia has released a survey showing that 74 percent of teachers say educational technology benefits their classroom in many ways, including the ability to reinforce and expand content, motivate students and respond to a variety of learning styles. Given these numbers, and despite increasing access, it's not surprising that 68 percent of teachers still want more access to technology in the classroom. That number goes up to 75 percent of teachers in low-income schools.
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Flame-retardants may affect a child's attention, IQ
Environmental Health Perspectives
Exposure to flame retardants during pregnancy or early childhood may lead to children with poorer attention, motor skills and IQ scores. The study of California children is the most comprehensive one to evaluate cognitive declines in school-aged children exposed to PBDEs. Although most forms of these chemicals have been banned, many household items, including couch cushions, still contain them.
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Aspiring teachers ill-prepared to use education technology effectively
eSchool News
Students who are studying to become teachers use social media in their personal lives more frequently than in-service teachers do, and they want to use ed tech in their classrooms — but their teacher preparation programs aren't fully preparing them to do this, according to a new report from Blackboard Inc. and Project Tomorrow.
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UPCOMING EVENTS





Event       Location     Dates Notes

CASE Winter Conference       Orlando, Fla.     Feb. 13-15 This is a hybrid conference. You can attend in person or via the Internet.
Daily Themes:
Applying Virtual Education
Integrated Education for ALL
Re-Inventing/Re-Booting SPED

CASE EC       San Antonio     April 2 More information to come.

CASE Member/BOD Meeting       San Antonio     April 3 More information to come.

CASE Night       San Antonio     April 4 More information to come.

 

CASE Weekly Update
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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