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ASD Professional Development
Dr. Ernsperger, BCBA-D

Promoting evidence based practice in the field of ASD with immediate application to the classroom. Please contact Dr. Lori at drlori@cox.net, or learn more.

 




CASE News

CASE 2013 election: Secretary
CASE
This year is the year for CASE members to elect a secretary. The office is a two year term beginning July 1 and ends June 30, 2015. According to the CASE Constitution, the duties of secretary are as follows:

The secretary shall keep accurate minutes of all meetings of CASE and of all meetings of the Executive Committee. He/she shall carry on correspondence as necessary in regard to matters delegated by the president and shall elicit, present and record proposals for establishing or revising the CASE Articles of Incorporation, CASE Constitution and by-laws, CASE policies and the CASE Policy Manual. The secretary shall coordinate, maintain and disseminate amendments to and an updated copy of the Articles of Incorporation and CASE Constitution and by-laws. The secretary shall have the option of appointing ad hoc committees as needed to fulfill these responsibilities. Click here for a more detailed description of the secretary position.

If you are interested in nominating yourself or someone else (with their permission), contact past president, Dr. Mary Kealy. Click here for the nomination form — send to Kealy or fax 571-252-1242. Deadline for nomination form is March 1.

SPECIAL THANKS!

Thanks so much to everyone — presenters, virtual and on-site attendees, sponsors and exhibitors — who made the 2nd annual CASE Winter Hybrid Conference such a huge success. We had over 42 sites and 27 states participate in the CASE Winter Hybrid conference. The CD-ROM can still be purchased if you would like to experience this great three-day professional development event.
Sponsors: Winsor Learning, National Center on Learning Disabilities, Conover Company and Cambium Learning Group: Voyager Learning;
Exhibitors: Center on Online Learning, Conover Company, Curriculum Associates, Electro-Medical Equipment, EPS/Literacy and Intervention, McGraw-Hill Education, National Professional Resources (NPR, Inc), PresenceLearning, Talent Assessment, Inc, VizZle, Winsor Learning.
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CASE Night
CASE
CASE Night April 4 in San Antonio ... Tickets ($65) are now on sale on the CASE Website, www.casecec.org. If you are going to CEC be sure to get your ticket for this wonderful evening of Texas Adventures. We will be doing an afterhours tour of the Alamo — and then move over to the historic St. Anthony's Hotel to have appetizers, hear a Jazz band and have dinner. After dinner we will have a DJ and a Line Dance Instructor help us dance the night away. Remember, CASE Night typically sells out so get your tickets now.
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Special Education Law Symposium
CASE
Designed for a national audience, this intensive one-week, well-balanced program is available on both a noncredit and graduate-credit basis and provides a thorough analysis of the leading issues under the IDEA and Section 504. Among the 19 symposium sessions are the following "hot topics": RTI; discipline, including a mock manifestation determination hearing;child find; transitional services; tuition reimbursement and other remedies; disability-­related bullying; and autism.
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Center on Online Learning
CASE
Online learning programs for K-12 students are enjoying rapid growth nationwide, but there is little understanding of the effectiveness of these programs for students with disabilities. Recognizing the need for research in this area, the Office of Special Education Programs within the U.S. Department of Education created the Center on Online Learning and Students with Disabilities one year ago. The Center aims to improve the accessibility and engagement of K-12 online learning for students with disabilities through a focus on learner variability.
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IDEA part B final regulations related to parental consent to access public benefits or insurance
CASE
On Feb. 14, the department published in the Federal Register IDEA Part B final regulations that change the requirements in 34 CFR 300.154(d) related to parental consent to access public benefits or insurance (e.g., Medicaid). Previously, public agencies were required to obtain parental consent each time access to public benefits or insurance was sought. These final regulations, which take effect on March 18 will make it easier for school districts to access public benefits while still protecting family rights.
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CEC Policy Insider


Speak out on behalf of special and gifted education — Share your story with CEC
CEC Policy Insider
Every year, CEC publishes the Federal Outlook for Exceptional Children, providing an overview of federally-funded programs — IDEA and Javits grants — that impact the lives of children and youth with disabilities and/or gifts and talents. The Outlook is distributed to members of Congress, federal agencies and other leaders in the education community with the hope that a better understanding of such programs will lead to increased federal funding for special/gifted education programs.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  READ180

READ 180 is a comprehensive system of curriculum, instruction, assessment, and professional development proven to raise reading achievement for struggling readers in grades 4–12+. Designed for any student reading two or more years below grade-level, READ 180 leverages adaptive technology to individualize instruction for students and provide powerful data for differentiation to teachers. READ 180 helps target the specific skill deficits and unique instructional needs outlined in a student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP). Learn More
 


USDOE responds to CEC concerns — Final regulations on IDEA parental consent to access public benefits work better for parents and schools
CEC Policy Insider
Recently, the U.S. Department of Education released its final regulations outlining when school districts must receive parental consent for accessing an individual's public benefits, like Medicaid. CEC has been working with its partners in the advocacy community for several years on this issue and is pleased to see the progress made.
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Budget, early childhood and higher education feature prominently in SOTU
CEC Policy Insider
Recently, President Barack Obama set forth his plans for the coming year and topping the list was ensuring Congress passes a budget that eliminates the need for sequestration and keeps the government open. CEC has worked over the last year and half to educate Congress about what sequestration and more budget cuts will mean for special and gifted education. We were pleased to see such a primary focus placed on this issue and the need to ensure we don't gut important investments.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TOP TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Obama warns of cuts to special education
Disability Scoop
The White House is urging Congress to take action to avert a series of deep spending cuts expected to impact special education and other disability-related programs within weeks. President Barack Obama is calling on lawmakers to pass a short-term budget deal to stall the automatic spending cuts scheduled to impact nearly all government programs come March 1. At that point, across-the-board cutbacks totaling $1.2 trillion over 10 years are expected under a process known as sequestration that was triggered when Congress failed to reach a budget deal in 2011.

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States get millions to train special educators
Disability Scoop
Nearly two dozen states will benefit from millions in new federal funding to improve training for those working with special education students in the nation's schools. The U.S. Department of Education says it is sending more than $24 million to 22 states. The funding is intended to help recruit and retain highly-qualified special educators, support teachers in blending the needs of those with disabilities and the new common core standards and train educators to utilize positive behavioral interventions and supports, among other initiatives.

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8 things to know about dyslexia
NBC News
Dr. Joseph Sirven, a contributor for NBC News, writes: "My parents instilled in me the value of education in providing opportunities in life. As a doctor, preventing and solving medical problems that can disrupt education at an early age is something I believe we both as individuals and as members of the Latino community must address. Dyslexia is one of the most common learning disorders that can lead to problems with education, but if identified early, academic concerns can be potentially averted. Here are 8 things you need to know about this condition."

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Hot Topics


Warning signs and help with dyslexia
First Coast News
Experts on learning disabilities say the numbers are hard to pin down, but 14-20 percent of children and adults may have dyslexia. It's so often undetected that stats are difficult. However, with early intervention a child can learn to overcome the challenges and succeed, in fact, succeed with great promise. According to Dr. Gayle Cane with Duval County Schools in Florida, dyslexics are typically very bright. Cane's own son and mother are dyslexic. She's worked, she says, with 1,000's of dyslexic students.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Student's Ambition Sparked by Academy of READING

Academy of READING
provides an individualized approach to developing foundation skills. This CASE-endorsed online intervention program targets critical skill gaps and helps students make fast, permanent gains in reading proficiency. Watch this video to hear a student and his mother discuss how Academy of READING impacted his life.
 


Treatment for traumatized kids? Best way to help children heal is unknown
The Associated Press via The Huffington Post
Shootings and other traumatic events involving children are not rare events, but there's a startling lack of scientific evidence on the best ways to help young survivors and witnesses heal, a government-funded analysis found. School-based counseling treatments showed the most promise, but there's no hard proof that anxiety drugs or other medication work and far more research is needed to provide solid answers, say the authors who reviewed 25 studies. Their report was sponsored by the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.
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Obama warns of cuts to special education
Disability Scoop
The White House is urging Congress to take action to avert a series of deep spending cuts expected to impact special education and other disability-related programs within weeks. President Barack Obama is calling on lawmakers to pass a short-term budget deal to stall the automatic spending cuts scheduled to impact nearly all government programs come March 1. At that point, across-the-board cutbacks totaling $1.2 trillion over 10 years are expected under a process known as sequestration that was triggered when Congress failed to reach a budget deal in 2011.
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Common Core technology requirements outlined
Education Week
One of the two consortia designing tests for the Common Core State Standards recently released new guidance on the minimum technology standards states will need to meet to give those tests, beginning in 2014-2015. The Partnership for the Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, or PARCC, says the guidance is meant to provide direction to states and districts on the extent to which current technology meets testing standards, or whether upgrades will be required.
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Anxious about tests? Tips to ease students angst
MindShift
As any parent or teacher knows, tests can create crippling anxiety in students — and anxious kids can perform below their true abilities. But new research in cognitive science and psychology is giving us a clearer understanding of the link between stress and performance, and allowing experts to develop specific strategies for helping kids manage their fears. These potential solutions are reasonably simple, inexpensive and, as recent studies show, effective. Some work for a broad range of students, while others target specific groups. Yet they're unfamiliar to many teachers and parents, who remain unaware that test anxiety can be so easily relieved.
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'Library' lets teachers test aids for special needs kids
ThisWeek Community News
Equipment needs for disabled students range from something as simple as a highlighter to a complex augmented-speech device. The Community Foundation of Delaware County has provided a $70,000 grant to the Delaware City School District to lend a hand with these needs. One of the projects is to create an assistive equipment lending library that will enable teachers to try out different pieces of equipment to see which item is necessary for their students with special needs.
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Legislation


Duncan to Congress: Giving states flexibility is working
U.S. Department of Education
Secretary Arne Duncan testified on Capitol Hill Thursday during a hearing on ESEA flexibility. Official Department of Education photo by Leslie Williams. States and their schools are breaking free from the restrictions of No Child Left Behind and pursuing new and better ways to prepare and protect all students, Education Secretary Arne Duncan told a Senate committee.
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Teen recommends changes to Senate Dyslexia Bill in Arkansas
KARK-TV
More people are voicing concern about a bill that could impact the way thousands of students are educated. Families are pushing for the Senate Bill 33, known as the "Dyslexia Bill," but a teenager with a similar learning disability is pushing for more to be done. Mary Katherine Keller, a recent high school graduate, wrote a poem about her experience growing up with a learning disability, when she was 15 years old.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    8 things to know about dyslexia (NBC News)
Steep cuts to special education, disability programs loom (Disability Scoop)
After criticism, DSM Committee changes course (Disability Scoop)
Nondrug ADHD treatments don't pan out in study (HealthDay News)
New Mexico may face loss of federal special education funds (Education Week)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Holding states and schools accountable
The New York Times
As Congress contemplates rewriting No Child Left Behind, President George W. Bush's signature education law, legislators will tussle over a vision of how the federal government should hold states and schools accountable for students’ academic progress. At a Senate education committee hearing to discuss waivers to states on some provisions of the law, Senator Lamar Alexander, Republican of Tennessee, forcefully urged the federal government to get out of the way.
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Department of Education awards $3 million to Connecticut, New Jersey, New York and New York City to aid in recovery from Hurricane Sandy
U.S. Department of Education
The U.S. Department of Education's Office of Safe and Healthy Students has awarded $3 million in Project School Emergency Response to Violence grants to Connecticut ($250,000), New Jersey ($1.25 million), New York ($500,000) and New York City ($1 million) to assist with recovery efforts in the wake of Hurricane Sandy. The widespread damage of the storm was particularly devastating to these communities.
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In the News


Survey: School bullies often popular
HealthDay News
Middle school students who bully are often the most popular, a new study has found. And the results were the same whether it was boys or girls who spread rumors, started fights or pushed other students around. For the study, researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles, surveyed nearly 1,900 students in 99 classes at 11 Los Angeles middle schools. The surveys, conducted at different points during grades 7 and 8, asked the participants to name the students who were considered the "coolest" and the ones who were bullies.
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Study: NCLB waiver weaken grad rate accountability
The Associated Press via ABC News
Many states granted waivers from the No Child Left Behind law are relaxing or ignoring federal regulations designed to hold schools accountable for the number of students who graduate from high school on time, according to a new study. When No Child Left Behind was signed into law in 2002, states used so many different ways to calculate graduation rates it was almost impossible to know how many students in the U.S. finished high school with a regular diploma in four years.
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Improving the effectiveness of our teachers will help student achievement
Center for American Progress
For a third-grader sitting in a classroom trying to comprehend fractions, the ability of her teacher to help her understand this mathematical idea is vitally important. Without knowing this core concept the student may never be able to succeed in future math classes and beyond. The more we study teaching, the more apparent it is that excellent teaching is likely to lead to learning. In sum, this student's future in school may depend on the skill of the teacher in her classroom today.
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Education content in State Of The Union likely to focus on littlest learners
The Huffington Post
President Barack Obama made K-12 education a major component of his 2012 State of the Union Address — so much so that the topic garnered the most traffic on sites like Twitter. But this year, education advocates are expecting something entirely different. The White House mostly has been tight-lipped about its State of the Union plans, but to the extent that the administration is saying anything, they're looking at the speech as an opportunity to "bookend" their K-12 plans, sources say. Instead of focusing on the compulsive, public kindergarten through high school school system, advocates are expecting the president to offer more of a focus on early education, with a little bit of higher education thrown in.
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5 education ideas from the State of the Union
CNN (Commentary)
To guess the education plans in President Barack Obama's State of the Union speech, look no further than the guests in first lady Michelle Obama's box. Obama's action points often reflected their stories: an undocumented college student who took part in Obama's "deferred action" plan; a 16-year-old winner of the 2012 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair; a recent community college graduate who now works on wind turbines; a young machinist who laid the foundation for his manufacturing career at his Kentucky high school; a first-grade teacher from Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn.; an early childhood educator from Norman, Okla., and a NASA Mars Curiosity rover team member who volunteers to mentor students in FIRST robotics.
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CASE Weekly Update
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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