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Dr. Ernsperger, BCBA-D

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CASE News

Lead Your Team to the Finish Line With CASE in Indy!
CASE
Facebook It seems hard to think about next year now ... but we need for you to just that. The Call for Proposals for the 24th Annual Fall Conference is on the CASE website and we need lots of great sessions for this wonderful collaborative meeting with our colleagues at Indiana CASE! The conference will be held earlier this year, Sept. 26-28 at the Indianapolis Hyatt Regency. We are especially looking for topics focusing on:
  • Strategies for Successful Educational Systems Transformation
  • Dynamic Research on Improved Delivery of Service
  • Innovative Programming for Students With Disabilities
Other topics of interest: Common Core State Standards and special education; Assistive Technology and Universal Design for Learning, Scientifically Based and/or Evidenced based curriculum supports, Effective Educator Evaluations designed for special education and support staff, and models of successful schools accountability.

Click here for a save the date flyer. Go to www.casecec.org for more information and to submit your proposal.

Did you get your Winter In CASE Newsletter via email link on Wednesday, March 6? IF not, go to the members only section to pick it up now. Don't forget to vote for secretary. You should have received your electronic ballot on Monday, March 4. Voting ends March 15. Please vote!

Thanks for all you do everyday for so many!

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Speaking of CEC...
CASE
Be sure you plan to arrive in San Antonio in time to come to the Annual CASE Member/BOD meeting starting with breakfast on Wednesday, April 3 at 7:30 a.m. We will be voting on constitutional changes during the membership meeting. You can view these changes in the member only section of the CASE website — http://www.casecec.org/members/.

It is also important for you to purchase your CASE Night ticket ASAP by going to the CASE website or going directly to http://www.casecec.org/registration/registration.asp?event=19. Tickets are $65 and include the afterhours tour of the Alamo as well as dinner and line dancing at the St Anthony's Hotel. Click here for a flyer on CASE Night. See you in San Antonio!

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San Antonio, here we come
CASE
Have you made your reservations to attend the CEC Convention in San Antonio April 3-6? CASE, as always, will be very busy at the convention. Our annual combined member and Board of Director meeting will be held on Wednesday, April 3 — starting with a breakfast sponsored by Stetson and Associates. We will be voting on some constitutional changes (click here for a summary) that are now posted on our CASE website in the members only section. Be sure to check them out. We will also be announcing the results of the CASE election for secretary — If you are a CASE member, you should have received your electronic ballot on Monday, March 4 or your mailed ballot if you are one of our 82 members without an email address at CEC on Wednesday or Thursday, last week. Candidate information can be found on the CASE website. In the afternoon section of our meeting, we will be announcing our Award winners. Our Awards are sponsored this year by Classworks!

Our SHOWCASE Session, sponsored this year by ST4 Learning and WordQ, will be on Thursday, April 4 and will once again feature Julie Weatherly, Esq. CASE Night will be a San Antonio Adventure, sponsored by Cambium Learning Group and will include an afterhours tour of the Alamo, appetizers and dinner at the historic St. Anthony's Hotel and ending the evening with a DJ and experienced line dancing instructor. CASE Night tickets are on sale now at the www.casecec.org. As always, we will have a great giveaway at the CASE booth — the place to hang out in the convention exhibit hall. On Friday, April 5, an annual CASE tradition, the Aspiring Administrators Panel, will be another great session you will not want to miss and you will want to encourage the teachers who are attending to mark this as a must be in session. See you on the River Walk.

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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  System 44

System 44 Next Generation is the new foundational reading program for your most challenged readers in Grades 3–12+. System 44 Next Generation is proven to help students master the foundational reading skills required for success with the Common Core through explicit instruction in comprehension and writing and a personalized learning progression driven by technology. System 44 was developed to ensure that students with unique learning challenges have the necessary support and scaffolds to address their specific needs. Learn More.
 


Not too early to be saving the dates
CASE
Speaking of dates ... the July Educational Legislative Leadership Seminar is just around the corner on July 14-17, 2013 at the Old Town Hilton, Alexandria, Va. Watch for more details in the next week.
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CASE Night
CASE
CASE Night April 4 in San Antonio ... Tickets ($65) are now on sale on the CASE Website, www.casecec.org. If you are going to CEC be sure to get your ticket for this wonderful evening of Texas Adventures. We will be doing an afterhours tour of the Alamo — and then move over to the historic St. Anthony's Hotel to have appetizers, hear a Jazz band and have dinner. After dinner we will have a DJ and a Line Dance Instructor help us dance the night away. Remember, CASE Night typically sells out so get your tickets now.
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Center on Online Learning
CASE
Online learning programs for K-12 students are enjoying rapid growth nationwide, but there is little understanding of the effectiveness of these programs for students with disabilities. Recognizing the need for research in this area, the Office of Special Education Programs within the U.S. Department of Education created the Center on Online Learning and Students with Disabilities one year ago. The Center aims to improve the accessibility and engagement of K-12 online learning for students with disabilities through a focus on learner variability.
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Special Education Law Symposium
CASE
Designed for a national audience, this intensive one-week, well-balanced program is available on both a noncredit and graduate-credit basis and provides a thorough analysis of the leading issues under the IDEA and Section 504. Among the 19 symposium sessions are the following "hot topics": RTI; discipline, including a mock manifestation determination hearing;child find; transitional services; tuition reimbursement and other remedies; disability-­related bullying; and autism.
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PARCC releases tool to prepare schools and districts for rigorous 21st century assessments
PARCC
The Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers announced a new planning tool and guidance for schools and districts that will help them get ready for new, 21st century assessments in the 2014-2015 school year.
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CEC Policy Insider


Sequester Begins — Specifics on special education cuts are clear
CEC Policy Insider
On March 1, at the stroke of midnight, President Barack Obama signed the official sequester order which set the cuts we have all been fearin in motion. According to that order, "over the course of the fiscal year, the sequestration requires ... 5.0 percent reduction in non-exempt nondefense discretionary funding. The sequestration also requires reductions of 2.0 percent to Medicare, 5.1 percent to other non-exempt nondefense mandatory programs, and 7.9 percent to non-exempt defense mandatory programs."
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Apply now: New fellowship opportunity from the Joseph P. Kennedy Foundation
CEC Policy Insider
The Joseph P. Kennedy Foundation is now accepting applications for a public policy fellowship for professionals who work with and/or family members of persons intellectual or developmental disabilities. Applicants who are working as self advocates or who are volunteering in the field of inclusive services and supports are particularly strong candidates. The intensive, one-year fellowship would take place in Washington, D.C. and would focus on preparing emerging and seasoned leaders to assume leadership in public policy, and will prepare fellows for leadership in the field of inclusive community supports and to make significant contributions to policy and program development in their home state.
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Speak out on behalf of special and gifted education — Share your story with CEC
CEC Policy Insider
Every year, CEC publishes the Federal Outlook for Exceptional Children, providing an overview of federally-funded programs — IDEA and Javits grants — that impact the lives of children and youth with disabilities and/or gifts and talents. The Outlook is distributed to members of Congress, federal agencies, and other leaders in the education community with the hope that a better understanding of such programs will lead to increased federal funding for special/gifted education programs.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Study: Childhood ADHD may lead to troubles later on
Reuters
Nearly a third of people diagnosed as children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder still have the condition in adulthood, according to a large new study that also found they're more likely to develop other mental disorders and to commit suicide. U.S. researchers who published their findings in Pediatrics found that about 29 percent of participants in the study who were diagnosed with ADHD as children ended up carrying that diagnosis into their late twenties.

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8 things to know about dyslexia
NBC News
Dr. Joseph Sirven, a contributor for NBC News, writes: "My parents instilled in me the value of education in providing opportunities in life. As a doctor, preventing and solving medical problems that can disrupt education at an early age is something I believe we both as individuals and as members of the Latino community must address."

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To read better, dyslexics may need to speed things up
Discover Magazine
"Slow down. Sound it out." This is the mantra for most dyslexic students learning to read. But results from a new computer training program suggest that the opposite may be true for dyslexics once they've learned to read — going faster could improve reading skills and comprehension.

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Hot Topics


School leaders brace for cuts as sequestration occurs
eSchool News
School districts around the country are bracing for more than $2 billion in federal spending cuts that kicked in March 1 after lawmakers failed to reach a deficit-reduction deal. School administrators say the cuts will result in fewer staff, larger class sizes and the delay of ed-tech purchases, among other effects. The cuts come as school districts are trying to prepare for more rigorous assessments aligned with the Common Core State Standards, and district leaders say the cuts will hinder these efforts.
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Can therapy dogs help kids with autism?
HealthDay News
For children with autism, trained dogs may offer not only a furry friend, but some therapeutic benefits, too, a new research review finds. There is a "substantial body of evidence" that dogs act as "social catalysts," even encouraging adults to be a little friendlier to each other, said senior researcher Francesca Cirulli, of the National Institute of Health in Rome, Italy. And the few studies that have focused on kids with autism suggest the same is true for them.
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Even when delayed, most kids acquire speech
Disability Scoop
The majority of youngsters with autism who have severe language delay do eventually learn to talk, researchers say. Some 70 percent of children with the developmental disorder who were not making meaningful phrases by age 4 ultimately achieved some form of speech by age 8 — whether talking in phrases or fluently — according to findings in the journal Pediatrics. The study is based on a review of clinical data on 535 children with autism who had no significant speech by the time they turned 4. Children were most likely to gain language abilities if they had high nonverbal intelligence and good social engagement, the study found. In fact, researchers said that kids with typical intelligence levels gained language almost six months sooner than those with below average IQ scores.
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Study: Childhood ADHD may lead to troubles later on
Reuters
Nearly a third of people diagnosed as children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder still have the condition in adulthood, according to a large new study that also found they're more likely to develop other mental disorders and to commit suicide. U.S. researchers who published their findings in Pediatrics found that about 29 percent of participants in the study who were diagnosed with ADHD as children ended up carrying that diagnosis into their late twenties.
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K-12 student database jazzes tech startups, spooks parents
Reuters
An education technology conference in Austin, Texas, will clang with bells and whistles as startups eagerly show off their latest wares. But the most influential new product may be the least flashy: a $100 million database built to chart the academic paths of public school students from kindergarten through high school. In operation just three months, the database already holds files on millions of children identified by name, address and sometimes social security number. Learning disabilities are documented, test scores recorded, attendance noted. In some cases, the database tracks student hobbies, career goals, attitudes toward school — even homework completion.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    To read better, dyslexics may need to speed things up (Discover Magazine)
The value of natural play (By Gordon MacIntyre)
ADHD treatments not working for most young children (HealthDay News)
Girls may be naturally resistant to autism (Disability Scoop)
High fat diets maybe linked to ADHD and learning problems (Medical News Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Legislation


Top K-12 senators ask Arne Duncan for more info on sequestration
Education Week
Two top Republican senators on education issues have some major questions for U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan when it comes to the way the Obama administration has been describing the automatic, across-the-board cuts known as sequestration. In a letter sent to U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, the ranking Republican on the Senate K-12 policy committee, and Sen. Jerry Moran of Kansas, the top Republican on the panel that oversees education spending, have questioned the department's estimate that 40,000 teachers could lose their jobs.
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First lady Michelle Obama announces Let's Move! Active Schools initiative
The White House
Michelle Obama launched Let's Move! Active Schools, an initiative to bring physical activity back to America’s schools. The program, for which NAESP is a national partner, provides simple tools to help schools create active environments where students get 60 minutes of physical activity before, during, and after the school day. Mrs. Obama called on school staff, families, and communities to work together to reach an ambitious goal of engaging 50,000 schools in this program over the next five years. Schools are encouraged to sign up at LetsMoveSchools.org, where they will be guided along a simple, six-step process. Participating schools will have access to free tools and resources, including in-person trainings, program activation grants and direct, personal assistance from certified professionals.
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Disability, literacy groups unite on common reading goal
Education Week
The push to have all children reading on grade level by third grade must include students with learning disabilities such as dyslexia, say two advocacy groups who have bonded over this common goal. The Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, based in New Haven, Conn., has made grants to support children with learning disabilities and their families since 1992. The Campaign for Grade-Level Reading is a coalition of philanthropies and associations working towards improving literacy among low-income children. The two organizations have come together to promote a new initiative called "Don't 'Dys' Our Kids," which offers policy solutions for including students with disabilities like dyslexia in literacy promotion efforts.
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In the News


Serving students with special needs and gifted and talented
District Administration Magazine
According to Connecticut's Wilton School District Superintendent Gary G. Richards, most people who move to Wilton do so for its high-quality schools, which has struck a successful balance between educating its most advanced learners and ones who need more help. The affluent, suburban district in Fairfield County, 50 miles northeast of New York City, is known as a high-quality district with modest class sizes (22 students or fewer in all grades); expansive Advanced Placement courses in English, music, mathematics, world languages, social studies, science and visual arts; and a nearly nonexistent dropout rate (less than .5 percent each year since 2009).
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Can student-driven learning happen under Common Core?
MindShift
Teachers use different strategies to help students learn. With the inevitable arrival of the Common Core State Standards, however, the big unknown is what will happen when the assessments are released and the states and the federal government develop policies to accommodate them. If the assessments fall back on the kinds of narrow questions we saw with No Child Left Behind, and if governments create the same kind of high-stakes accountability, teachers will be herded back towards lower levels of prescriptive learning that leave little room for student voice and ownership. But if assessments mirror the broad principles and effective pedagogy that the CCSS authors have championed, there is hope that rote learning and teacher-driven classrooms will not be necessary in order for students to pass the test.
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Schools shift from textbooks to tablets
eSchool News
Well before the cleanup from Superstorm Sandy was in full swing, students could read about the weather system that slammed the East Coast in their textbooks. Welcome to the new digital bookcase, where traditional ink-and-paper textbooks have given way to iPads and book bags are getting lighter. Publishers update students' books almost instantly with the latest events or research. Schools are increasingly looking to handheld tablets as a way to sustain students' interest, reward their achievements and, in some cases, actually keep per-student costs down.
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States tackle school safety after Sandy Hook shootings
Stateline
In recent weeks, the South Dakota legislature has been rattled over a bill that aims to make schools safer by introducing "school sentinels" — teachers, administrators, security guards or community volunteers who would carry guns to protect their schools. "If you have not heard about the sentinels bill, it's probably time to come out of hibernation," state Sen. Craig Tieszen joked, according to the Argus Leader. The plan, which school districts could adopt voluntarily, passed both chambers of the legislature, despite protest from the state's school board association and most Democrats, and is headed to Gov. Dennis Daugaard.
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Video games may sharpen focusing skills in kids with dyslexia
HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report
Here's one possible treatment for dyslexia that kids won't complain about: video games. Italian researchers report that they found that children with the reading disability scored better on tests after they played an action video game for hours, possibly because their minds temporarily became more focused. It's not clear if video games directly improved the dyslexia in the kids. If it did, no one knows how long the effect might last or whether the strategy is a better approach than traditional treatments. In other words, dyslexic children shouldn't necessarily play a couple of video games and call their reading specialist in the morning.
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When bullying goes high-tech
CNN
As many as 25 percent of teenagers have experienced cyberbullying at some point, said Justin W. Patchin, who studies the phenomenon at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. He and colleagues have conducted formal surveys of 15,000 middle and high school students throughout the United States, and found that about 10 percent of teens have been victims of cyberbullying in the last 30 days.
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Study: More sleep equals smarter children
redOrbit
A new study by researchers from the University of Tübingen's Institute for Medical Psychology and Behavioral Neurobiology reinforces how necessary sleep is for a child's brain, even more so than adults. Researchers wrote in the journal Nature Neuroscience about how children's brains turn learned material into active knowledge as they sleep and how their brains do it even more effectively than an adult's. Past studies have shown sleeping after learning helps long-term storage of the material learned, because during sleep, memory is turned into a form that makes future learning easier.
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UPCOMING EVENTS





Event       Location     Dates Notes

CASE EC       San Antonio     April 2 More information to come.

CASE Member/BOD Meeting       San Antonio     April 3 More information to come.

CASE Night       San Antonio     April 4 More information to come.



 

CASE Weekly Update
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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