This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




Text Version    RSS    Subscribe    Unsubscribe    Archive    Media Kit April 27, 2015

Home   About CASE   Membership   Archives   Awards   Events   Resources   Legislative   Contact Us    

 




CASE News

It is THAT time again...
CASE
Our CASE Legislative Summit is just around the corner! This year we are very excited we will be combining with CEC to expand our "footprint" on the Hill! Actually some of you may not know that the July Legislative Summit grew out of me attending the CEC CAN (Children Action Network) meeting each June. After my first meeting, I was so excited and impressed with what the meeting was I wanted ALL local SPED directors to have the opportunity that one person per state had! And thus was born the annual CASE Educational Legislative Leadership Summit or ELLS! This will be our 13th year and we have made some serious impact up on the Hill and back in your states/districts. Our CASE Legislative Chair and I always attend the CEC CAN meeting typically held in June and we use that as an opportunity to finalize our program for the July meeting — so we have continued to "steal" ideas from the CEC Policy Unit led by Dr. Deb Zeigler. This past summer, the CEC Executive Director, Alex Graham, attended our Summit and then began to ask this question, "Why do we have a CEC trip up on the Hill in June, a CASE trip in July, and then bring in the State/Provincial/Division leaders at the end of July?" And as we all looked at these three trips to D.C. we thought what a better use of personnel and what a GREAT BIG footprint we could make up on the Hill if we were all in town at the same time! It IS after all about influence, isn't it? So a collaboration was formed. The CEC Leadership meeting will be held just prior to the Legislative Summit with hopes many of them will stay over and register for the Summit! The CAN meeting will be embedded in the Legislative Summit and hopefully all the CASE attendees will really encourage others from their state to attend. Think about the impact a team of teachers, administrators, university personnel, related service providers and others would have on your congressional delegations! For those of you who have participated in the CASE Summit, you will see that all the familiar program, visit, Thank You reception, etc. are all very much the same — the marketing and the size will be different and hopefully our influence will be even greater! We will have a VERY SHORT early bird so you want to get on board quickly! Click here to register and get this great rate! The hotel will be the same as last year — Hilton Old Town — a great location for lots of fun and just across the street from the King Street Metro stop! The room rate will be $155 And you can register for the hotel on the same link as the Summit or you can click here. Hope to see you and your team in D.C. this July 12-15!

If you have questions, feel free as always to contact me.

So, if you are one of our Canadian members this obviously is not your cup of tea! ... The Legislative Summit is a very U.S.-centric professional development event — so apologies to our Canadian and other international members/friends. I will tell you we did have one Canadian come one year and though she followed me with my visits and said she learned a lot, she also visited the Canadian Embassy. We also had a Korean delegation come one year! We connected them up with several world groups on the day we did Hill visits and they said they benefited from it. So, there is the possibility we can "tailor" a special side trip for you on that Tuesday. However, what I again ask our Canadian members/friends to do is let us hear from you as to what skills/knowledge/resources you do need and let's partner to try to get those to you and your colleagues! As I have said before, I have to depend on YOU to help us provide the resources you need! Please contact me and let me hear what CASE can do for you! We are all interested in seeing results and we just need to know how to better do that for all students!

Did you miss the election results? CASE held our regular election in February and the results were announced at our Annual meeting in San Diego. In case you haven’t heard, the 2015-2017 CASE secretary will be Laural Jackson (AK). All members could vote on the Secretary. Only the Board of Directors voted on the other office, Representative to the Units, a three year term office. The new Unit Rep will be Emilie Maule (IA). Both of these offices will begin on July 1. Have you thought of running for a CASE office before? Go ahead and start thinking about next year. The CASE past-president is in charge of the slate of officers and the 2016 election will be for president-elect and for treasurer! So, if you are interested or want to discuss either of these offices, contact Laurie VanderPloeg (MI). Also, I would love ideas on how to get more of our members to vote! We do the entire election electronically with members receiving an email with links to the bios and voting — a very simple process and since we typically have no more than 2 offices at a time, minimal time involvement! Yet, our rate of voting is less than 7 percent of our members! What would encourage you to vote? Or what have you done in your organizations that got folks to click on that button? Please let me hear from you!

Last Week's Poll asked "What do you think contributes MOST to improved results with students with disabilities?" The first place answer with an amazing, though not surprising, 84 percent was well prepared teachers. Second place with 11 percent was appropriate student supports in all classrooms. Third and last place at 5 percent was adequate funding. Of course it could be argued we can only have well prepared teachers and appropriate student supports if we have sufficient funding. But, my answer was well prepared teacher, too!

Be sure to read the article below by CASE legislative consultant Myrna Mandlawitz. She is catching us up on what is really going on inside the beltway on ESEA!

Thanks for all you do all the time to make sure ALL students have what they need to succeed!

Signature


Luann Purcell
Executive Director
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Bipartisan ESEA Bill Developed in Senate Committee
Myrna Mandlawitz, CASE Legislative Consultant
In January 2015 Senator Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., chairman of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, issued a discussion draft for the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, currently known as No Child Left Behind. He solicited comments from the public, with the intention of eventually releasing a bipartisan bill. After several months of serious negotiations led by Alexander and Senator Patty Murray, D-Wash., ranking Democrat on the committee, the Every Child Achieves Act was released. As this article was being written, the Committee was set to take up the bill beginning on April 14. While both Alexander and Murray acknowledge the bill does not comport completely with what either would have wanted, they agree this is a solid effort that moves the process forward.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Call for Proposals for the 26th Annual Fall Case Conference on Oct. 29-31at the Hyatt Regency in Atlanta Extended to May 11
CASE
Please mark your calendars and plan to join us at the 26th Annual Fall Case Conference on Oct. 29-31 at the Hyatt Regency in Atlanta. The theme will be, "Continuing to Take Care of Business." There will be motivating keynote speakers and presentations aligned to the theme focusing on innovative programming for students with disabilities or procedures for developing successful transformational change. As districts continue to evolve with common core standards, improved statewide assessments, and refined measures of teacher effectiveness, we are looking forward to highlighting successes from the field in these areas.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


How safe is the schoolhouse?
Autism National Committee
The updated 2015 edition of How Safe Is the Schoolhouse? An Analysis of State Seclusion and Restraint Laws and Policies, written by Jessica Butler, has been published by the Autism National Committee. The report describes and examines state restraint and seclusion statutes, regulations, rules, and policies/guidelines in effect as of March 2015.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


April is Autism Awareness Month!
CASE
The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children has a new Autism Awareness Infographic to help communities increase awareness about the issues of wandering in Children with Autism, enabling them to better address these issues in communities.

For the graphic, please click: http://www.missingkids.com/en_US/documents/AutismAwareInfographic.pdf.

Home page of NCMEC is here at: http://www.missingkids.com/home.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Did you missed the 4th annual Hybrid?
CASE
If you missed the 4th annual Hybrid, you can still get the great content by purchasing the DVD! They will be delivered to you within 4 weeks of the end of the conference. Click here for the Schedule-in Eastern Time, click here for a flyer, and click here to purchase the DVD!
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Are your struggling readers prepared for college and career?

READ 180 Next Generation is the leasing blended learning solution that prepare your students for the rigorous expectations of College & Career. Only READ 180 delivers a personalized learning path, daily practice in argument writing, hundreds of content-rich texts, and an individualized staircase of text complexity. Learn more
 




  Creating Pathways to the Future

We provide districts and organizations with a program review of Transition Services and/or professional development to implement effective Transition Services with results, implement 18-21 services, vocational education and much more.
-Dr. Vickie J Mitchell vickie@mitchellpanter.com  - 936-494-9080
 


A matter of equity: Preschool in America
OSERS
All parents hope their child will start school ready for success. Unfortunately, not every parent can find the high-quality early learning opportunity that sets their child up for success.

Earlier today the U.S. Department of Education released a new report outlining the unmet need for high-quality early learning programs in America. Roughly 6 in 10 4-year-olds are not enrolled in publicly funded preschool programs, and even fewer are enrolled in the highest quality programs.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


50 Ways to Test: A look at state summative assessments for 2014-2015
Education Commission of the States
Has the frenzy around Common Core State Standards impacted decisions on which state summative assessments are being administered this year? That's the question on many minds as we approach spring testing time. As many states began adopting college and career ready standards, such as the Common Core State Standards, there became a subsequent need to develop new summative assessments — tests that measure the new skills and knowledge outlined in the new standards.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT




Special Education Law Symposium
The 40th Anniversary of the IDEA: The Past is Prologue
June 21-26

Lehigh University
Lehigh University’s intensive one-week institute provides a practical analysis of legislation, regulations, and case law relating to the education of students with disabilities. The symposium is designed for special education coordinators and teachers, principals, psychologists, parent advocates, attorneys (on both sides), hearing officers, state officials, and other individuals interested in legal literacy concerning the education of students with disabilities.

The program offers two parallel tracks, one for basic that offers in-depth foundation knowledge about the IDEA and Section 504: Eligibility, FAPE, LRE, Student Discipline, and Remedies. The other track is for advanced participants, offering brand new "hot topics": Settlement Process, Exiting Special Education, "Meaningful" Parental Participation, Inadequate IEP Implementation as a FAPE Denial, Transition Services, Parental Private Placements, and State Complaint Resolution Process.

The experienced program faculty features attorneys Laura Anthony (Ohio), Edward Bauer (Florida), Maria Blaeuer (Washington, DC), Esther Canty-Barnes (New Jersey), Andrew Cuddy (New York), Laura Gillis (Massachusetts), Zvi Greisman (Maryland), Dana Jonson (Connecticut), Michael Joyce (Massachusetts), Isabel Machado (New Jersey), Deborah Mattison (Alabama), Kevin McDowell (Indiana), Michael Stafford (Delaware), and — from Pennsylvania — Andrew Faust, Joshua Kershenbaum, Dennis McAndrews, Gabrielle Sereni, and Dr. Perry Zirkel.

The symposium begins on Sunday evening with a dinner and keynote lecture by Dr. Melody Musgrove, Director, Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), U.S. Department of Education.

The workshop is offered for graduate and continuing education credit. Weekly and daily options are available. Full information is available on our website: coe.lehigh.edu/law. For any questions, email or call Shannon Weber or Donna Johnson at specialedlaw@lehigh.edu or (610) 758-5557.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    His right to recess: ADHD kids should never lose play (ADDitude)
Senate plan retains testing cap for students with disabilities (Disability Scoop)
Is America nearing the end of the No Child Left Behind era? (The Atlantic)
Tips for teaching students with autism (Scholastic Administrator Magazine)
Study: Gifted students still at risk of being left behind (The Des Moines Register)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Teacher Educators and Accomplished teachers
Pearson
Pearson is in need of educators to score edTPA! edTPA is designed for the profession by the profession, edTPA was developed by teachers and teacher educators from across the nation, in collaboration with faculty and staff from Stanford University, to support candidate learning and preparation program growth and renewal. Aligned with the Common Core State Standards and InTASC Standards, edTPA assesses teaching that promotes student learning in diverse contexts.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Things You Cannot Do With an iPad
The LOGAN® PROXTALKER® communication device is ideal for any picture exchange system user, of any age and is being used for communication or as a classroom tool.
Caselite
A web-based system that addresses the challenge of intervention scheduling in the schools. It's designed for anyone who needs to schedule and document interventions. MORE


CEC Policy Insider


U.S. Senate Education Committee Unanimously Approves ESEA Rewrite
CEC Policy Insider
On April 16, the U.S. Senate HELP Committee voted out of Committee the Every Child Achieves Act of 2015. The committee debated the bill for 3 days. Eighty-seven amendments were filed, over 50 were considered, and others were withdrawn or never offered in the spirit of bipartisanship.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


New OSERS Grants: Vocational Rehabilitation and Technology, Media and Materials
CEC Policy Insider
The following information regarding OSERS Notices was published in the Federal Register during the week of April 6-10. Applications for New Awards; Vocational Rehabilitation Services Projects for American Indians with Disabilities. The purpose of this program is to provide vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians with disabilities who reside on or near Federal or State reservations, consistent with their individual strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice, so that they may prepare for and engage in high-quality employment that will increase opportunities for economic self-sufficiency.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


IES releases grant competitions in education and special rducation research and Training for FY 2016
CEC Policy Insider
on April 15, The Institute of Education Sciences released FY2016 funding announcements for grant competitions in education and special education research and training.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Hot Topics: Subject line featured story

As a nation, how can we best empower our gifted kids?
Psychology Today
Should your child move ahead to that advanced math class? Should they skip a grade? Should they enter college early? What impact will that have on their educational and social/emotional trajectory? What does the research evidence tell us? Educational acceleration is when a student chooses to move through the traditional curriculum at a pace that is faster than normal. A decade ago, a landmark report titled A Nation Deceived: How Schools Hold Back America’s Brightest Students laid out the research evidence showing that students who want to educationally accelerate and are ready for it should be allowed to do so.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  


  PRODUCT SHOWCASES
A New Solution for Creating Effective Behavior Interventions

Using the tool’s guided-process, quickly create accurate, effective Proactive Strategies, Replacement Behaviors, and Reactive Strategies to help meet IEP goals.

  • Assess Problem Behaviors
  • Implement Behavior Plans
  • Track Progress
  • Achieving Mobility and Having Fun!


    Every child deserves the chance for growth. Mobility can be difficult to achieve for children with special needs, even after years of rigorous therapy. While children are simply enjoying a nifty, exciting new toy, parents are amazed at the continuous improvement of motor skills, coordination, balance and more.
    Voyager Passport
    Voyager Passport® gives you a dynamic blend of print instruction and technology to help more of your struggling learners master priority skills and strategies to reach grade-level performance. A Teacher's Resource Kit includes everything you need to accommodate diverse learners, including instructional support for English learners and flexible grouping strategies.


    Legislation


    Fresh battles loom when full Senate takes up ESEA rewrite
    Education Week
    The bipartisan rewrite of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act that the U.S. Senate education committee unanimously approved joins a crush of legislative priorities awaiting debate on the chamber's floor — a process that's not guaranteed, and one that will likely draw intense partisan sparring. Even if the bill breaks through an already-clogged congressional calendar and moves to debate, it could look radically different as senators on both sides of the aisle offer amendments to reshape the measure to their liking.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    Education Department cautions districts about 'forcing' parents into due process
    Education Week
    Public agencies, including school districts, should avoid short-circuiting a parent's ability to complain directly to the state about a special education dispute, says a "Dear Colleague" letter recently released from the U.S. Department of Education. The Individuals with Disabilities Act provides several ways for school districts and parents to resolve disagreements. Those methods include filing due process complaints, which are resolved by independent hearing officers, and state complaints, which allow parents or districts to take a disagreeement directly to the state. In the latter case, state officials are tasked with investigating and making an independent determination of whether the IDEA has been violated.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    In the News


    Fidgeting helps children with ADHD learn, study suggests
    Science World Report
    It makes sense that children with attention deficit disorder would be more likely to fidget, but could this behavior also be particularly beneficial for them? New findings published in the Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology reveal that swinging their legs around more or excessively tapping on a table or the like could help them remember information, solve complex problems or partake in certain social situations later in life.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    5 strategies for SPED success with Common Core
    Scholastic Administrators Magazine
    As the Common Core State Standards have been implemented this school year, with many states in the midst of using the new standardized tests, the transition has been mired in challenges. The Common Core is a critical step toward ensuring students have the skills and knowledge they need to succeed in life beyond graduation, but teachers and students alike have been apprehensive and overwhelmed. They need greater support, more empathy, and better communication from school and district leaders to help them overcome their anxiety.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    Autism in college: How are institutions helping students succeed?
    Education DIVE
    College students with autism are often tempted to keep their needs quiet. They see the move onto campus as a fresh start after high school and a move away from the children they grew up with and, perhaps, were teased by. College is a step toward independence and students determined to make it on their own don’t want to admit they need help. But they do need help. According to research about the success of students on the autism spectrum in college, 80 percent of this population does not complete a degree. And the rate of children with autism continues to grow. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s latest report on the prevalence of the disorder showed a near doubling of cases from 2004 to 2014. Now, one in 68 children is born on the spectrum. For boys, the rate is one in 54.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    My child struggles with writing: How can we discover the cause?
    By: Howard Margolis
    Parents of struggling writers worry about their children's struggle. They see their children's tears. They hear their protests. They feel their pain. And generally, they ask three questions: Why does she struggle? What will help her? Why didn't her (or his) writing evaluations help? In this first of two articles, I'll talk about Sheila, a composite of many struggling writers with whom I've worked. If, like Sheila, your child or student struggles with writing, this article may help both parents and teachers to develop a writing program focused on her needs.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    Senators spar over aid for students with dyslexia
    Washington Examiner
    Members of the Senate education committee sparred over an amendment that would give teachers extra training on teaching students with dyslexia. The amendment eventually failed by two votes in the 22-member committee. The amendment would not mandate that federal funding go towards extra training, but would allow states and local school districts, if they so choose, to use federal funds on training toward identifying dyslexia and other specific learning disabilities. Its critics argued that all disabilities, not just specific learning disabilities, should get the support the amendment called for. For example, autism and attention-deficit disorder do not fall under the category of specific learning disabilities.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    Stay balanced as the school year intensifies
    MiddleWeb (commentary)
    Elizabeth Stein, a contributor for MiddleWeb, writes: "It's the time of year when our teaching responsibilities are mounted high. We may find ourselves feeling stretched thin by the hectic pace of things we must do and things we should do. If we're lucky we get to do some things we want to do. But it isn't easy. We continue with our regular routines of lesson planning, co-planning, faculty meetings, parent communications and professional development opportunities. IEP's must be reviewed and new IEP's must be written. We can add the testing season, which far too often brings unnecessary stress"
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    Inconsistent training leaves special education staff struggling
    EdSource
    Every day in special education classrooms across the state, teachers and aides oversee students whose emotional and behavioral disabilities can trigger violent confrontations. In some cases, teachers and aides wrestle these students to the floor, pin them against classroom walls, and escort or drag them into seclusion rooms. Operating outside the restrictions of general education, special education staff are authorized by the California Education Code to declare a “behavioral emergency.” That determination allows staff members to initiate emergency interventions that are defined only by what they may not be: electric shock, denying access to bathroom facilities, noxious sprays to the face, and interventions that can be expected to cause excessive emotional trauma.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    Is there such a thing as musical dyslexia?
    Newsweek
    Music education in the Western world often emphasizes musical literacy, the ability to read musical notation fluently. But this is not always an easy task — even for professional musicians. Which raises the question: Is there such a thing as musical dyslexia? Dyslexia is a learning disability that occurs when the brain is unable to process written words, even when the person has had proper training in reading. Researchers debate the underlying causes and treatments, but the predominant theory is that people with dyslexia have a problem with phonological processing — the ability to see a symbol (a letter or a phoneme) and relate it to speech sounds. Dyslexia is difficult to diagnose, but it is thought to occur in up to 10 percent of the population.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    Restraint and seclusion mandate advances in Senate
    Disability Scoop
    A plan to rewrite the nation's primary education law is set to go before the U.S. Senate and it now includes a provision related to restraint and seclusion in schools. The Senate's Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee unanimously approved a bill to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. The bill now heads to the full Senate where it is expected to be considered this spring.
    Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
    READ MORE


    Federal Announcements


    OSERS Notices

    Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA)
    The following Notice of Applications for New Awards; Vocational Rehabilitation Services Projects for American Indians With Disabilities were published in the Federal Register on Tuesday, April 7.
    Notice inviting applications for new awards for fiscal year (FY) 2015. Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 84.250K.
    Dates:
    Applications Available: April 7
    Deadline for Transmittal of Applications: June 8


    Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP)
    The following Notice of Applications for New Awards; Educational Technology, Media, and Materials for Individuals With Disabilities — Research and Development
    Center To Advance the Use of New and Emerging Technologies to Ensure Accessibility was published in the Federal Register on Tuesday, April 7.
    Notice inviting applications for a new award for fiscal year (FY) 2015. Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 84.327B.
    Dates:
    Applications Available: April 8
    Deadline for Transmittal of Applications: May 26


    Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 84.160A.

    SUMMARY: The Secretary proposes to waive the requirements that generally prohibit project periods exceeding five years and extensions of project periods involving the obligation of additional Federal funds for five 60-month projects initially funded in fiscal year (FY) 2010. The Secretary also proposes to extend the project period for these projects for one year. The proposed waiver and extension would enable the currently funded Regional Interpreter Education Centers for the training of interpreters for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing and individuals who are deaf-blind to receive funding through Sept. 30, 2016.
    Dates:
    Comments due on or before May 18


    Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 84.160B

    Summary: The Secretary proposes to waive the requirements that generally prohibit project periods exceeding five years and extensions of project periods involving the obligation of additional Federal funds for a 60-month project initially funded in fiscal year (FY) 2010. The Secretary also proposes to extend the project period for one year. The proposed waiver and extension would enable the currently funded National Interpreter Education Center to receive funding through Sept. 30, 2016.
    Dates:
    Comments due on or before May 18


    Agencies: Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education, Rehabilitation Services Administration, Education; Employment and Training Administration (ETA), Labor.

    Dates: Comments due on or before June 15


    The following Notice of Proposed Rulemaking regarding State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program; State Supported Employment Services Program; Limitations on Use of Subminimum Wage was published in the Federal Register on Thursday, April 16.

    Dates: Comments due on or before June 15


    The following Notice of Proposed Rulemaking regarding Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, Miscellaneous Program Changes was published in the Federal Register on Thursday, April 16.

    Dates: Comments on or before June 15
     

    CASE Weekly Update
    Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
    Download media kit

    Hailey Golden, Senior Education Editor, 469.420.2630   
    Contribute news

    Articles appearing in CASE Weekly include recent stories in the media related to Special Education and may not directly reflect the views and position of CASE. The appearance of advertising in CASE Weekly does not constitute CASE endorsement of any product, service or company or of any claims made in such advertisement.

    This edition of CASE Weekly Update was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here — it's free!
    Recent issues
    April 20, 2015
    April 13, 2015
    April 6, 2015
    March 30, 2015



    7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063