This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Click here to advertise in this news brief.




  Mobile version    RSS    Subscribe    Unsubscribe    Archive    Media Kit Apr. 29, 2013

Home   About CASE   Membership   Archives   Awards   Events   Resources   Legislative   Contact Us    

 




CASE News

Can you believe it is almost May?
CASE
Facebook For many school districts, May is the last month of school. Everyone is stressed with IEPs, Transitions, Standardized Tests, and a plethora of "New and Improved" or "Old but True" standbys! Why is it we never have vacancies when we have great applicants and never have great applicants when we have a ton of vacancies — or is that just I problem I had every year? And graduation ... is that a stressor for you? It was for me — I was in charge of the security for 4 large high school graduations all held at our very large arena on a hot weekend in May for 18 years ... I remember shocking my brother at an event in Atlanta when I could point out all the plain clothes law enforcement personnel at my niece's graduation — when did we develop those skills and who is evaluating us on that part of the job?
But
What an opportunity we have to see the fruits of our labor and leadership ... take a minute to pat yourself on the back for all the students who will make it to the next grade, who read better, do math well, will graduate, have a job all because of the hard work of your team of leaders, teachers, support staff, related service providers, community and parents. CASE hopes we were able to help provide you with some resources, opportunities and encouragement to make that team work just a bit smoother this past year. Let us know what you wished we had helped you with — what you know you need this coming year. The leadership of YOUR professional organization want your input as we continuously assess our strategic goals and objectives. Please let us hear from you.

We are adding a new feature to our weekly update — a polling place. Each week we will ask you to give us just one piece of information and then the next week we will report back on the findings. Some of the questions may carry critical weight and some may just be for fun — we hope you will participate and even give us some suggestions on what the question should be.

Hope you are planning to attend the July Educational Legislative Leadership Summit, July 14-17 ... read more below and go to the CASE website to register today. And be sure to start planning to attend the 24th Annual CASE fall conference, Sept. 26-28 in Indianapolis, Ind. As you wind down this year, be sure you stay connected by planning on these great professional development opportunities.

PS ... If you did something to mark April as Autism Awareness Month, please email me at lpurcell@casecec.organd let us know. We joined in with the IDEAPartnership to see how much of a collective difference we could make — help us document that difference by sending to me what you did!

Signature
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Advocacy = student success!
CASE
If you really want to make a difference, then you need to register now for the 11th Annual CASE Legislative Leadership Seminar, July 14-17. This annual seminar will reinforce the importance of one added to a strong voice. Last year 78 CASE members from 25 different states met with their senators and representatives to discuss the issues concerning students with disabilities. We need your voice. We will be at a different hotel this year — the Hilton Alexandria Old Town — just across the street from the King Street Metro Station. For more information and links to both the hotel and seminar registration, go to the CASE website.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  System 44

System 44 Next Generation is the new foundational reading program for your most challenged readers in Grades 3–12+. System 44 Next Generation is proven to help students master the foundational reading skills required for success with the Common Core through explicit instruction in comprehension and writing and a personalized learning progression driven by technology. System 44 was developed to ensure that students with unique learning challenges have the necessary support and scaffolds to address their specific needs. Learn More.
 


Job Posting


Let CASE post your job positions
CASE
CASE will be glad to post job positions each week — Please send to Luann Purcell, executive director by Tuesday of each week for posting the next week. It should be about a paragraph in length but you can attach a PDF document that interested persons can then click through to for more information or you can provide a URL link for the same purpose. Please indicate at what date the post should be pulled not to exceed 6 weeks.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Positions
Berkshire Hills Music Academy, a private post-secondary residential school for young adults with a love of music who have learning, cognitive or developmental disabilities, is seeking a new executive director. Located in South Hadley, Mass., the academy uses a strength-based, music-infused curriculum to promote gains in self-efficacy as well as to cultivate performing arts abilities. www.berkshirehills.org

The executive director will lead the school, oversee staff and programs, and be responsible for fiscal health and fundraising. Requires experience working with individuals with disabilities, management and fundraising experience.

For more details, click here. Send cover, resume and salary history to Susan Egmont, Egmont Associates, segmont@egmontassociates.com.


Georgia Council of Administrators of Special Education (G-CASE) Executive Director
Qualifications:
The G-CASE Executive Board is seeking a proven leader with excellent communication and organizational skills, as well as a personal commitment to serving and supporting educational leaders in their service to students with disabilities.

Click here for more information.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


CEC Policy Insider


'Welcome back to another day in paradise': CEC celebrates teachers at the White House Teacher of the Year ceremony
CEC Policy Insider
"Welcome back to another day in paradise," is how National Teacher of the Year award winner Jeff Charbonneau greets his students every day. For him, school is paradise — he says that the work is a reward of its own.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Dwindling federal support results in fewer investments in special education research
CEC Policy Insider
The research arm of the U.S. Department of Education announced that it will not have sufficient funding to initiate a special education research grant competition for fiscal year 2014, a result of sequestration and the 30 percent — or $20 million — funding cut incurred by the National Center for Special Education Research over the last few years that CEC and special education advocates have been fighting to reverse.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
 
BEST TEACHERS KNOW WHAT WORKS!

RESCUE THE STUDENTS NOW (GRADES K-2) and
THE SEVEN PHASES OF SPELLING (GRADES 2-6)

Structured, sequential, step-by-step, time saving instruction in:
READING, SPELLING, PENMANSHIP,
COMPOSITION, COMPREHENSION


Enhance your current curriculum or use independently to increase students’ success. See more on the web-link below.
CLICK FOR INFORMATION AND FREE DVD/CD
 


CEC joins national education, disability, mental health organizations in calling for school safety framework
CEC Policy Insider
CEC joined with numerous national education, disability and mental health organizations in supporting a framework for improving school safety and increasing access to mental health supports for children and youth.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Senators to Arne Duncan: Stop flat-funding key K-12 programs
Education Week
The Obama administration has been a big fan of using competitive grants to drive its agenda on everything from teacher quality to standards to "personalized learning," much to the chagrin of some advocates for school districts.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Special education programs needed, but who should pay for them?
Duluth News Tribune
We have to be able to talk about this. No, not in a way that pits families of special-needs students against the families of other students, and certainly not in a way that would even suggest children with mental and physical disabilities don't deserve and aren't entitled to the same educational opportunities as any other students.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Congress rewrites IDEA funding rule
Disability Scoop
A small change tucked inside a government spending bill may have big implications for special education. Lawmakers included language clarifying the penalties that states may face if they fail to adequately fund education programs for students with disabilities.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more



Hot Topics


Cyberbullying reaches beyond the playground
By Peter Martini
Bullying was once considered an essential part of growing up, especially during middle or junior high school, building character in the participants because it was believed the victim would put an end to it, usually in a physical altercation. Before the digital revolution of the past 15 years, being a bully or the victim generally had a lot to do with physical attributes and the physical proximity between the participants. The digital age has erased even that small barrier, making it possible for children to further invade each other's personal space to humiliate, demean and disenfranchise each other, in addition to creating a sense of fear in the victim.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE

Industry Pulse: Does your school have a zero-tolerance policy for bullying?
ANSWER NOW


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Gains with Special Education Students

Special Education students at Ridgegate Elementary School, Texas, are making gains in proficiency after using Academy of READING and Academy of MATH online intervention programs. Hear why these CASE-endorsed programs are so effective with Special Education students. View video.
 


Kids' learning disabilities may have multiple causes
HealthDay News
Up to 10 percent of children — two or three kids in every classroom — are thought to have learning disabilities, and a new review finds these disabilities have complex causes and suggests possible approaches. Children frequently have more than one learning disability, the research showed. For example, 33 percent to 45 percent of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder also have dyslexia and 11 percent also have dyscalculia. Dyslexia is a reading, writing and spelling disability while dyscalculia is a math learning disability.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Do obesity and ADHD share common risk factors?
GoodTherapy.org
Childhood obesity is becoming an epidemic in North America. Children are getting heavier with each decade, increasing the risk for physical problems such as heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. Obesity also makes children more vulnerable to negative psychological outcomes from bullying behaviors, isolation and self-esteem issues. Self-regulation deficits are believed to play a key role in the development and maintenance of obesity, similar to how it affects behaviors in other conditions, including anorexia, bulimia and attention deficit hyperactivity. Eating and food issues are thought to be partially influenced by self-regulatory processes. Impulse control, a primary impairment in ADHD, also appears to impact eating behaviors in overweight people and those with other eating issues.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword ADHD.


How to foster collaboration and team spirit
MindShift
Once they get to the working world, most students, in almost any job, will collaborate as a member of a team. And every student needs to be prepared for that environment — partly for employment opportunity, but mainly because the deeply embedded mental model of learning and creating as an individual process is obsolete. Collaboration has become the chief way in which things are done. Powerful collaboration is driven by incisive communication — and out of that process come the very best expressions of innovation, creativity and critical inquiry.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Legislation


Senators to Arne Duncan: Stop flat-funding key K-12 programs
Education Week
The Obama administration has been a big fan of using competitive grants to drive its agenda on everything from teacher quality to standards to "personalized learning," much to the chagrin of some advocates for school districts. So far, Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives have resisted that strategy. But Democrats in the U.S. Senate have continued to finance the administration's favorite competitive-grant programs, such as Race to the Top, although not always at the level the administration has sought.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Testing consortium releases draft accommodations policy
Education Week
What accommodations will be provided for students with disabilities and those learning English on the new common assessments? You can get an early glimpse of what half the states are considering by looking at the draft accommodations policy that one of the two testing consortia — the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers — has released.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Build A Powerful Online Presence
iPage makes it easy and affordable to create a powerful website for your business – no experience necessary. Add to that a 24x7 support team and tons of free marketing tools, and you’ve got the recipe for online success! You can drive more traffic and get more customers than ever before.
 


Sequestration to deeply affect special education and children with special needs
Law Firm Newswire
The looming sequester has special education advocates concerned. Nationally, sequestration looks to eliminate federal funding for the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act in 2013 by as much as $1 billion. That would leave as many as 7,200 special education educators without covered salaries. The cuts would also bump the amount of money the federal government contributes toward special education back to what it was in 2005. "States across the county are looking at huge cuts," notes Palo Alto, Calif., estate planning attorney Michael Gilfix.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Stakeholders advocate for autism awareness, support
eSchool News
News that the Centers for Disease Control updated its autism diagnosis estimate to 1 out of every 50 children drew the attention educators, parents of children with autism and autism awareness advocates, all of whom say they hope schools can serve students on the autism spectrum, which includes a staggeringly wide range of student abilities and needs under its umbrella. The new diagnosis numbers are "striking, especially when we put it into context," said Nina Finkler, director of outreach for Eden Autism Services. This means that almost 750,000 individuals in the U.S. are diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, and it is now the most frequently diagnosed childhood disorder, diagnosed more than cancer, diabetes and other childhood illnesses combined.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


States pull back from Common Core
U.S. News & World Report
Lawmakers in some states hope to halt the transition to the Common Core State Standards, even as school districts across the country are rolling them out. In Alabama, senators are considering a bill to repeal the standards, which the state's Board of Education adopted in 2010. Alabama schools are already using the new math standards, which aim to give the subject context by teaching high school students to use mathematical models to analyze everyday situations, and are set to implement the English standards before the start of the next school year.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Statement of US Secretary of Education Arne Duncan — FY 2014 budget request
U.S. Department of Education
Arne Duncan, secretary of Department of Education, writes: "Good morning Mr. Chairman and Members of the Subcommittee. I'm pleased to be here today to talk with you about President Obama's priorities and plans for the Department of Education. I'm happy we were able to submit the President's 2014 Budget to the Congress last week, and to have this opportunity to talk with you today about some of the President's major proposals. I want to begin by expressing my appreciation to Chairman Harkin and others on this Subcommittee for your support over the past 4 years in making critical investments in our schools and our students. I am happy to report today that while we clearly have further to go, those investments are beginning to pay off."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


In the News


More than 50 years of putting kids' creativity to the test
NPR
Let's start with a question from a standardized test: "How would the world be different if we all had a third eye in the back of our heads?" It's not a typical standardized question, but as part of the Next Generation Creativity Survey, it's used to help measure creativity a bit like an IQ test measures intelligence. And it's not the only creativity test out there. So why bother measuring creativity? James Catterall, a psychologist and director of the Centers for Research on Creativity in Los Angeles, says the simple answer is that if society, business and education demands it, then we need to know when it's happening; otherwise, we're just guessing when it's there.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    President's budget proposal includes few increases for special education; expands investment in preschool, overall education budget (CEC Policy Insider)
Response to intervention policy and practice inconsistent across states (Education Week)
Getting the best people into the toughest jobs (Center for American Progress)
Report: African-American males with disabilities suspended at far greater rates than peers (CEC Policy Insider)
Let CASE post your job positions (CASE)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Children with autism more prone to video game addiction
Medical Daily
Children and teenagers with autism spectrum disorder spend more time playing video games and watching television than their neurotypical siblings, and are more likely to develop "problematic" media habits like video game addiction, according a recent study. The findings add context to the growing use of autism therapies based on video games and other technologies, which researcher Temple Grandin believes have great potential in teaching children with ASD how to develop social and communication skills.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


To improve school climate, examine recess
Edutopia
As we look at ways to create environments that allow teaching and learning to thrive, it's time to take a long, hard look at the critical role of recess in our schools. Recess has the potential to transform schools, and groups are finally speaking out about the powerful role it has in the school day, including the American Academy of Pediatrics which, earlier this year, released a policy statement to this effect.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Possible link between ADHD in children and cellphone use
Psych Central
A new study suggests a potential link between the symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and cellphone use. ADHD is a condition characterized by high levels of distraction, impulsiveness, an inability to remain still and a tendency to be abnormally talkative. For the study, researcher Yoon Hwan Byun of the Department of Medicine at Dankook University College of Medicine in Korea set out to discover whether radio-frequency electromagnetic fields affect developing brains with prolonged exposure. Past research has suggested a link between prenatal cellphone exposure and the risk of conduct and behavior problems in children.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Making progress on understanding dyslexia
New Hampshire Union Leader
Twenty-six years ago, New Hampshire made history when the state Department of Education ordered the Henniker school district to pay $17,000 to cover the cost of teaching a student how to read. Karen Morse was president of Henniker High's Class of 1984, president of the student council, a member of the National Honor Society and a star athlete. She also was severely dyslexic. Morse's dyslexia — the learning disorder hinders the ability to read, write and process language — went undiagnosed until she was a junior. After 11 years of school, her reading skills hovered at a first-grade level.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Dyslexia doesn't equate to disability
The Argus Leader
Ten-year-old Benton Meier can build almost anything, from a cart to transport the family's snowmobile to a loft for his bedroom. He says recess is his favorite part of the school day but also admits to a liking for science. If the weather would cooperate, the South Dakota Brandon Valley Elementary School fourth-grader would be out dirt biking after school or working on his fort, an abandoned party shack. Benton also has a golf-ball business to keep him busy, retrieving wayward balls that left the nearby Brandon Municipal Golf Course and cleaning them for resale. He'll have to abandon it several times this summer, once to attend an inventors' camp. He also finds time to do something that used to be a struggle: read books. Benton has boosted his reading level two grades this school year.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


UPCOMING EVENTS





Event       Location     Dates Notes

11th Annual CASE ELLS       Washington, D.C.     July 14-17 More information to come.

Fall Board of Directors Meeting       Indianapolis, Ind.     Sept 25-26 More information to come.

24th Annual CASE Conference       Indianapolis, Ind.     Sept 26-28 More information to come.



 

CASE Weekly Update
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Hailey Sasser, Senior Education Editor, 469.420.2630   
Contribute news

Articles appearing in CASE Weekly include recent stories in the media related to Special Education and may not directly reflect the views and position of CASE. The appearance of advertising in CASE Weekly does not constitute CASE endorsement of any product, service or company or of any claims made in such advertisement.

This edition of CASE Weekly Update was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here — it's free!
Recent issues
April 22, 2013
April 22
April 15, 2013
April 8, 2013



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063