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When things go viral...
CASE
You have probably heard about the Italian Teacher and his summer activity list. When I saw the story about Mr. Cesare Cata's Summer homework list I had several thoughts. The first was we didn't even use the term "going viral" in a non-medical way even 5 years ago! Have you ever stopped to think how many everyday terms we use today that involve some type of technology that we didn’t use five or ten years ago? We google, Facebook, "pin," "tweet," etc now ... when did nouns start becoming verbs? The second thought I had was this list is a testimony to teaching being an art. These 15 items highlight the very beauty of being a human being and at the same time weave in the learning that had taken place during the school year. Mr. Cata has painted a beautiful tapestry of learning, character, and thought. Reminds me of our history lessons on the Renaissance Man! And finally I had a thought of hope. Several of the comments from people all over the world reflected on the desire to study under a teacher like Mr. Cata. There was that recognition that a great teacher brings learning and joy to his/her students. We can all hope to produce more and more great teachers so all students can experience that joy! Take a few minutes and read out Mr. Cata's summer list — this is a to do list we could all benefit from accomplishing!

Speaking of accomplishing your "to do" list ... I hope you have checked off two items from your June To Do list: 1. Submitted a nominee for the G Award and 2. Registered for the CASE/CEC Legislative Summit! Today is the last day to submit the nominations for the G Award! The G Award is in only it's second year and is designed to give special kudos to a "new" special education administrator. Take a few minutes to nominate someone in their first three years of leadership who has done an exceptional job of supporting the teachers and students they serve — someone who leads with their heart! Click here to go to the nomination form!

The second item on your to do list is registering for the Summer Legislative Summit. We need to "tell the story" of all the amazing things our staff and students have accomplished this year to those up on the Hill. As the tag line says, "What happens in the classroom shouldn't stay in the classroom. Send the good news from your district to Capitol Hill." We need a team from EVERY state in order to really make a statement! As you enter into your Senator or Representative's office, think what kind of impression you will make when you can say there are teams visiting their Senator's and Representative's offices from all 50 states! Be a leader and not only make sure you are a part of this great event, but make sure you are a part of a TEAM to make an even bigger impact on your state delegation! Go to the CASE website or straight to the Summit website for more information and to register now!

Last Week's Poll asked How many years had you been in education when you moved into a leadership position?” Of those answering this week's poll, 48 percent had been in education 7-10 years when they entered into the leadership field. Nineteen percent entered after 4-6 years followed closely by 15 percent entering after 11-15 years. Eleven percent entered leadership after 16-20 years. There was a tie at 4 percent for those who had less than 3 years experience or 21 or more years! Thank you to all of you who answered the poll this week. It is very helpful to our leaders to hear from our members! Do you have ideas for the polling question? Post them on our CASE Facebook page or email them to me!

Thanks for all you do all the time to make sure ALL students succeed!

Signature


Luann Purcell
Executive Director
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The CASE 'G' Award for Rising Special Education Administrators
CASE
Do you know a new special education administrator who has routinely "stuck their neck out" for teachers and students during this past school year? Last year was the first year for the new CASE award called the "G"AWARD for Rising Special Education Administrators. It was instituted for a member of CASE who is early in his/her career as an administrator. This individual may be nominated within their first 3 years of administrating special education programs/services and the award will be accompanied by a night on the town in their home area (limo, dinner, movie, child care, etc.) with a $1000 value. This award is acknowledgement of the administrator for sticking his/her neck out to better support their teachers to enable them to make a difference in the lives of the students they serve. The deadline for the award nomination is June 15. Nominations should be sent to Membership Chair Emilie Maule.

The award will be given at the Fall CASE Conference and the recipient will receive up to $1000 to be spent totally on a special night on the town and NOT for anything that could be used in classrooms or schools — this is a pamper yourself award! The person being nominated for the award must exemplify the following 5 values:
    VALUES
  1. "Heart" is at the core of what we do
  2. Lead by example
  3. Be honest
  4. Think outside the box
  5. Always use a collaborative approach
You can go to the CASE website to get additional information or you can click here.

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SPONSORED CONTENT



This year, CASE will be joining forces with CEC to make an even bigger impression up on the Hill!

CASE
This four-day legislative summit is for teachers, administrators, teacher educators, teachers in training – anyone who passionately supports national special education issues that improve educational outcomes for students with exceptionalities and the professionals who work on their behalf.

Get all the knowledge and training you need to be an effective special education advocate, including:
  • Detailed issue briefings that explain the critical issues facing special education
  • Insider perspectives from experts in national education policy organizations
  • Coaching and practice sessions on delivering effective advocacy messages
  • An opportunity to share your views and your students' success stories with your members of Congress during Special Education Day on Capitol Hill
Special Education Day on Capitol Hill will show decision makers in Washington how investing in special education pays off in successful students who are college and career ready and make important contributions to their communities.

Click here for more information.

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Bridging the gap between educators and policy experts
The Teacher Voice Project
From NCLB to IDEA to FERPA, we see the impact of decisions by Congress on a daily basis in our schools. Too often, the voices of teachers and administrators are absent from the table when these momentous decisions are made, though their wisdom and experience are imperative to making them work. For those who are interested in joining the policy debate at the state or federal level, a new report (Teacher Voice: The Current Landscape of Education and Policy Expert Communication) may help. Through case studies and survey results, it explores how educators and policy experts currently communicate and offers tips for teachers and administrators hoping to get more involved in policy discussions.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Are your struggling readers prepared for college and career?

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SPONSORED CONTENT


Special Education Law Symposium
The 40th Anniversary of the IDEA: The Past is Prologue
June 21-26

Lehigh University
Lehigh University's intensive one-week institute provides a practical analysis of legislation, regulations, and case law relating to the education of students with disabilities. The symposium is designed for special education coordinators and teachers, principals, psychologists, parent advocates, attorneys (on both sides), hearing officers, state officials, and other individuals interested in legal literacy concerning the education of students with disabilities.

The program offers two parallel tracks, one for basic that offers in-depth foundation knowledge about the IDEA and Section 504: Eligibility, FAPE, LRE, Student Discipline, and Remedies. The other track is for advanced participants, offering brand new "hot topics": Settlement Process, Exiting Special Education, "Meaningful" Parental Participation, Inadequate IEP Implementation as a FAPE Denial, Transition Services, Parental Private Placements, and State Complaint Resolution Process.

The experienced program faculty features attorneys Laura Anthony (Ohio), Edward Bauer (Florida), Maria Blaeuer (Washington, DC), Esther Canty-Barnes (New Jersey), Andrew Cuddy (New York), Laura Gillis (Massachusetts), Zvi Greisman (Maryland), Dana Jonson (Connecticut), Michael Joyce (Massachusetts), Isabel Machado (New Jersey), Deborah Mattison (Alabama), Kevin McDowell (Indiana), Michael Stafford (Delaware), and — from Pennsylvania — Andrew Faust, Joshua Kershenbaum, Dennis McAndrews, Gabrielle Sereni, and Dr. Perry Zirkel.

The symposium begins on Sunday evening with a dinner and keynote lecture by Dr. Melody Musgrove, Director, Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), U.S. Department of Education.

The workshop is offered for graduate and continuing education credit. Weekly and daily options are available. Full information is available on our website: coe.lehigh.edu/law. For any questions, email or call Shannon Weber or Donna Johnson at specialedlaw@lehigh.edu or (610) 758-5557.

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How safe is the schoolhouse?
Autism National Committee
The updated 2015 edition of How Safe Is the Schoolhouse? An Analysis of State Seclusion and Restraint Laws and Policies, written by Jessica Butler, has been published by the Autism National Committee. The report describes and examines state restraint and seclusion statutes, regulations, rules, and policies/guidelines in effect as of March 2015.
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A matter of equity: Preschool in America
OSERS
All parents hope their child will start school ready for success. Unfortunately, not every parent can find the high-quality early learning opportunity that sets their child up for success.

Earlier today the U.S. Department of Education released a new report outlining the unmet need for high-quality early learning programs in America. Roughly 6 in 10 4-year-olds are not enrolled in publicly funded preschool programs, and even fewer are enrolled in the highest quality programs.

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50 Ways to Test: A look at state summative assessments for 2014-2015
Education Commission of the States
Has the frenzy around Common Core State Standards impacted decisions on which state summative assessments are being administered this year? That's the question on many minds as we approach spring testing time. As many states began adopting college and career ready standards, such as the Common Core State Standards, there became a subsequent need to develop new summative assessments — tests that measure the new skills and knowledge outlined in the new standards.
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Midwest Symposium for Leadership in Behavior Disorders
Conference on Behavior Issues for School Leaders
Oct. 8-9
12604 Quivira Road, Overland Park, Kansas

Midwest Symposium for Leadership in Behavior Disorders
The Conference on Behavior Issues for School Leaders sponsored by Midwest Symposium for Leadership in Behavior Disorders provides evidence-based information for building leadership teams to build positive student behavior and work effectively with difficult students.

Conference features: Vern Jones, Ph.D., author and co-author of books including, "Comprehensive Classroom Management: Creating Communities of Support and Solving Problems", and "Creating Effective Programs for Students with Emotional and Behavior Disorders." Sessions will focus on what school leadership teams can do to support teachers in their work with challenging students. David Bateman, Ph.D., co-author of "A Principal's Guide to Special Education" and "The Special Education Program Administrator's Handbook" will talk about what special education teachers want/need from their school leaders and what administrators need to know about the 504 process.

Contactwww.mslbd.org "School Leaders’ Conference" for session descriptions, registration and hotel information. Early Bird discounts are available through Sept. 25, 2015. Teams of 3 or more receive a 15 percent discount. This is a conference you don't want to miss!

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Teacher Educators and Accomplished teachers
Pearson
Pearson is in need of educators to score edTPA! edTPA is designed for the profession by the profession, edTPA was developed by teachers and teacher educators from across the nation, in collaboration with faculty and staff from Stanford University, to support candidate learning and preparation program growth and renewal. Aligned with the Common Core State Standards and InTASC Standards, edTPA assesses teaching that promotes student learning in diverse contexts.
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CEC Policy Insider


Register for the 2015 Special Education Legislative Summit
CEC Policy Insider
Want to enhance your advocacy skills, learn about important special/gifted issues and early intervention, and take CEC's messages to Capitol Hill? Then come to the Special Education Legislative Summit July 12-15 in Alexandria, Virginia. Registration is easy, simply visit the Special Education Legislative Summit website, click the registration tab. Join us in July!
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Yudin Confirmed
CEC Policy Insider
Recently, the Senate confirmed Michael Yudin to serve as Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services at the U.S. Department of Education. Arne Duncan in his announcement of Yudin's confirmation said, "Michael has dedicated his career to advocating for all students to have access to and receive a quality education.
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OSEP Policy Index for IDEA
CEC Policy Insider
The Secretary has published a list of correspondence from the U.S. Department of Education to individuals during the previous quarter. The correspondence describes the Department's interpretations of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act or the regulations that implement the IDEA.
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Nominate a White House Champion of Change for Disability Advocacy Across Generations
CEC Policy Insider
This year marks the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, a time to celebrate the successes of its passing while also remembering that full inclusion and equal opportunity are still not a reality for many individuals with disabilities. The Act would not have been passed had it not been for those individuals who advocated so strongly on its behalf.
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Hot Topics: Subject line featured story

Replacing filler in special education documents
Edutopia
Special education teachers want to celebrate the achievements of their students, but doing so can be difficult for those students who struggle to make progress. Consequently, teachers have a tendency to inflate the smallest successes. For some students, finding these successes takes some reaching.
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Legislation


Few states have replenished education funds cut during recession
McClatchy Washington Bureau
Only a handful of states that cut education money during the recession have increased it since the economic recovery, according to a report about how public schools are funded. It also found that most states don't funnel extra education dollars to public schools with high concentrations of poverty. "The nation as a whole, this report shows, is failing to provide the resources our students need," said David Sciarra, executive director of the Education Law Center, an advocacy group for equal educational opportunity that produced the report. It covers the nation's 49 million K-12 students in public schools.
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In the News


Students with disabilities face uncertain paths after graduation
Education Week
Before the law that governs special education was enacted 40 years ago, youths with disabilities were often marginalized. Only about 1 in 5 children with disabilities was enrolled in public schools in 1970, according to the U.S. Department of Education. The legislation that later came to be known as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act made a dramatic difference. Students with disabilities now have the right to be educated in public schools with their nondisabled peers and to be prepared for a positive and productive life after school.
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Students with disabilities face double-digit achievement gaps
Disabilities Scoop
A new report finds that students with disabilities are faring far worse on standardized tests than their typically-developing peers. Scores for kids with disabilities ranged from 32 to 41 percentage points below those for other students on state assessments during the 2012-2013 school year, according to findings from the National Center on Educational Outcomes at the University of Minnesota. For the report, researchers combed websites for all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 10 other areas including Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.
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Still more questions than answers about how to treat ADHD
The Washington Post
Health-care professionals, educators and patient advocates debate endlessly over attention deficit disorder. Some argue about the cause of the condition, which is associated with inattentiveness and, often, hyperactivity. Many disagree on treatment and parenting techniques. A dwindling group disputes whether it actually exists.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Achievement gaps on state tests remain wide for students with disabilities (Education Week)
Schools accused of forcing out special education students (Disability Scoop)
Positively managing student behavior in the classroom (By: Savanna Flakes)
How schools maximize gifted talent (District Administration Magazine)
For kids who stutter, rhythm perception may be key (HealthDay News via WebMD)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


The daily habits of organized kids
ADDitude Magazine
Systems and structure don't come naturally to your child with ADHD. And if you have ADD, too, you know that it takes a lot of work to keep track of all life's details. To ease the burden, here are helpful strategies for creating structure in your home so each day doesn't feel like a whole new scattered experience.
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Embracing my dyslexia makes me a better teacher
SchoolWeek (commentary)
Rachel Jones, a contributor for SchoolWeek, writes: "Tasks such as writing and alphabetizing can be time-consuming and tricky, but children learn more helpful lessons when we are honest about the challenges we face in life than when we try to conceal them. What is it like to be a teacher with dyslexia? I have been staring at that question for 20 minutes now, and, despite being a teacher with dyslexia, I'm not sure I know the answer."
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Cyberbullying and face-to-face harassment a toxic combination for kids
Today News
Not all bullying is equal, according to a new study, with the old-fashioned, real-life variety more damaging than the cyber kind. A combination of both, however, could be the real danger to kids. Researchers from the University of New Hampshire analyzed interviews with 791 people (ages 10 to 20) who had taken part in a previous harassment survey. They looked at three types of bullying: face-to-face, technology only and a mix of the two.
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To prevent wandering, schools move forward with alarms
Disabilities Scoop
The nation’s largest school district says it will install door alarms at nearly every one of its schools in an effort to help protect students with disabilities who are at risk of wandering. The New York City Department of Education said that 97 percent of its schools have requested the alarms, which will be installed by the end of 2015. Some schools already had alarms in place or are located inside buildings with security, officials said. In total, the district plans to spend $5.55 million to put more than 21,000 devices in over 1,200 school buildings.
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Study: Autism screens by preschool teachers an option for early detection
Education Week
Early education providers can be a good option for detecting autism spectrum disorder in minority children, a population that has been traditionally been underserved by early-intervention programs, according to a recent study. The researchers, based in New Jersey, reached out to Head Start programs and other state-licensed providers in low-income, high-minority cities in the state. The child care workers screened 90 percent of the children whose parents gave permission for them to participate; most of the children were black or Hispanic and between ages 3 and 5.
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District introduces gifted programs to push talented students, keep families
The Washington Post
When D.C. Schools Chancellor Kaya Henderson came to the District in 2007, there was no office for gifted education and no plan for serving the city’s most talented learners. The school system was overwhelmed with working to raise basic skills for the large number of struggling students. The lack of stimulating District classrooms sent many parents looking for gifted or advanced programs in the suburbs, led them to move their children to charter schools or private schools, or prompted long commutes to schools in the city’s wealthiest Zip codes.
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Federal Announcements


OSERS Notices

Agencies: Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education, Rehabilitation Services Administration, Education; Employment and Training Administration (ETA), Labor.

Dates: Comments due on or before June 15


The following Notice of Proposed Rulemaking regarding State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program; State Supported Employment Services Program; Limitations on Use of Subminimum Wage was published in the Federal Register on Thursday, April 16.

Dates: Comments due on or before June 15


The following Notice of Proposed Rulemaking regarding Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, Miscellaneous Program Changes was published in the Federal Register on Thursday, April 16.

Dates: Comments on or before June 15


 

CASE Weekly Update
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Hailey Golden, Senior Education Editor, 469.420.2630   
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Articles appearing in CASE Weekly include recent stories in the media related to Special Education and may not directly reflect the views and position of CASE. The appearance of advertising in CASE Weekly does not constitute CASE endorsement of any product, service or company or of any claims made in such advertisement.

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