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Speaking of saying Thank You...
CASE
Have you ever started looking for something and along the way found something totally different and wonderful? I have mentioned Heidi Jacobs Hayes TED video before and if you haven't watched it, you really should. In it she asks what is wrong with starting on an internet search for one thing and finding so much more, maybe off topic, than for what you started looking? She even suggests keeping a class Wiki on those "accidental finds!" I got an email about a new book by an author I have read in the past and it reminded me I hadn't read his books in a long time. So, I Googled him and went to his website. I particularly like his books because many are set in the D.C. area and describe buildings and settings I have grown to know through our CASE advocacy opportunities. When I got to his website, I noticed that he has started to write children's books, too. I knew about his amazing television inquiry series on the History Channel, Decoded, where a team took a historical "rumor" and through searching in the Library of Congress and other primary sources would either prove or disprove the rumor. But again, I just kept following one train of thought to another and then I saw it. A picture of Brad Metzler and an older woman with the caption: Brad and Teacher. Of course, I had to click on that one and what a gift I got! I am not going to tell you what it says because I cannot write as well as he does. You will just have to believe me it will be worth the 5 minute diversion and click here to read it for yourself. I will be surprised if you don't go back and look at other parts of his website. I do believe it is one of the most fascinating websites I have ever explored! I will give you a hint to the article, he says thank you in a very special way!!

Speaking of mysteries set in the D.C. area ... I hope you have registered for the CASE/CEC Summit! We will try to unravel the mysteries of quality education for our congressional delegations as we head up on the Hill on Tuesday! Over 130 had registered as of Friday morning. The hotel extended our great rate through June 22 — today — so get your rooms ASAP! We need someone from every state at the Summit so we can "swarm" the Hill. And, don't forget all the amazing speakers we will have sharing with the group. Head over to the dedicated website and look at who will be working with us during the Summit. One of the highlights is the Thank You Reception CASE has been sponsoring for over 12 years. We always have a great speaker from OSERS or OSEP and this year is no exception! The reception is all about partnerships and collaboration. It is not uncommon for us to have more than 15 different national organizations attend the reception. You don't want to miss seeing how other national associations respect and partner with CASE. Click here to go to Summit dedicated website where you can see the schedule, speakers, register and get your hotel all on one website!

Did you get it? On Thursday, June 18 last week, the Spring issue of the CASE In CASE quarterly newsletter was sent out electronically. If you did not receive it, then most likely you have either not updated your email with CEC, you need to check your IT department about a spam blocker, or you have let your CEC/CASE membership expire! If you did not get it and you do not believe any of these reasons apply, contact me and we will see what we can do to take care of the problem. Remember, in the meantime, you can always read this issue and all the past issues behind the MEMBERS section of the CASE website. To access the MEMBERS section, you use your CEC MEMBERS ONLY log in. For a direct link to the CASE MEMBERS section, click here.

If you did get your edition, I hope you have read it! There is very important information in the issue on leadership, ESY,MOE, the upcoming July meeting and the Save the Date on the CASE Fall Conference. There are also great updates from the CASE committees and of course all the details and some pictures from the CASE activities at CEC! New to this issue are actual hot links embedded in the pdf so you can jump to the end of a story or to the websites referenced. Let us know how you like the newsletter, what you wished you could see there that wasn’t there, etc. Talk to us on the CASE Facebook page or by emailing me. We do want to be responsive to our members!

Last Week's Poll asked Over the course of your administrative career, how many different superintendents have you served under? We had a great turn out on the responses! Of those answering this week's poll, 30 percent had served under 1-2 different superintendents. Twenty six percent had served under 3-4 different superintendents. Twenty two percent had served under 5-6 different superintendents. There was a three way tie at 7 percent for those who had had served under 7-8, 9-10, and 11 or more different superintendents! While this data tells a story, I did have one long time administrator text me to say she technically only served under one superintendent before she moved into the leadership of a shared service where she actually had the title of superintendent. Her board was made up of district superintendents but she really didn't serve under but that one at the beginning of her administrative career. This situation reminds us of all the differences in the nomenclature and leadership structure within districts, higher education, shared services agencies, etc! We are a diverse professional community! Thank you to all of you who answered the poll this week. It is very helpful to our leaders to hear from our members!

Thanks for all you do all the time to make sure ALL students succeed!

Signature


Luann Purcell
Executive Director
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This year, CASE will be joining forces with CEC to make an even bigger impression up on the Hill!

CASE
This four-day legislative summit is for teachers, administrators, teacher educators, teachers in training – anyone who passionately supports national special education issues that improve educational outcomes for students with exceptionalities and the professionals who work on their behalf.

Get all the knowledge and training you need to be an effective special education advocate, including:
  • Detailed issue briefings that explain the critical issues facing special education
  • Insider perspectives from experts in national education policy organizations
  • Coaching and practice sessions on delivering effective advocacy messages
  • An opportunity to share your views and your students' success stories with your members of Congress during Special Education Day on Capitol Hill
Special Education Day on Capitol Hill will show decision makers in Washington how investing in special education pays off in successful students who are college and career ready and make important contributions to their communities.

Click here for more information.

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Bridging the gap between educators and policy experts
The Teacher Voice Project
From NCLB to IDEA to FERPA, we see the impact of decisions by Congress on a daily basis in our schools. Too often, the voices of teachers and administrators are absent from the table when these momentous decisions are made, though their wisdom and experience are imperative to making them work. For those who are interested in joining the policy debate at the state or federal level, a new report (Teacher Voice: The Current Landscape of Education and Policy Expert Communication) may help. Through case studies and survey results, it explores how educators and policy experts currently communicate and offers tips for teachers and administrators hoping to get more involved in policy discussions.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


How safe is the schoolhouse?
Autism National Committee
The updated 2015 edition of How Safe Is the Schoolhouse? An Analysis of State Seclusion and Restraint Laws and Policies, written by Jessica Butler, has been published by the Autism National Committee. The report describes and examines state restraint and seclusion statutes, regulations, rules, and policies/guidelines in effect as of March 2015.
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A matter of equity: Preschool in America
OSERS
All parents hope their child will start school ready for success. Unfortunately, not every parent can find the high-quality early learning opportunity that sets their child up for success.

Earlier today the U.S. Department of Education released a new report outlining the unmet need for high-quality early learning programs in America. Roughly 6 in 10 4-year-olds are not enrolled in publicly funded preschool programs, and even fewer are enrolled in the highest quality programs.

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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Are your struggling readers prepared for college and career?

READ 180 Next Generation is the leasing blended learning solution that prepare your students for the rigorous expectations of College & Career. Only READ 180 delivers a personalized learning path, daily practice in argument writing, hundreds of content-rich texts, and an individualized staircase of text complexity. Learn more
 




SPONSORED CONTENT


50 Ways to Test: A look at state summative assessments for 2014-2015
Education Commission of the States
Has the frenzy around Common Core State Standards impacted decisions on which state summative assessments are being administered this year? That's the question on many minds as we approach spring testing time. As many states began adopting college and career ready standards, such as the Common Core State Standards, there became a subsequent need to develop new summative assessments — tests that measure the new skills and knowledge outlined in the new standards.
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Midwest Symposium for Leadership in Behavior Disorders
Conference on Behavior Issues for School Leaders
Oct. 8-9
12604 Quivira Road, Overland Park, Kansas

Midwest Symposium for Leadership in Behavior Disorders
The Conference on Behavior Issues for School Leaders sponsored by Midwest Symposium for Leadership in Behavior Disorders provides evidence-based information for building leadership teams to build positive student behavior and work effectively with difficult students.

Conference features: Vern Jones, Ph.D., author and co-author of books including, "Comprehensive Classroom Management: Creating Communities of Support and Solving Problems", and "Creating Effective Programs for Students with Emotional and Behavior Disorders." Sessions will focus on what school leadership teams can do to support teachers in their work with challenging students. David Bateman, Ph.D., co-author of "A Principal's Guide to Special Education" and "The Special Education Program Administrator's Handbook" will talk about what special education teachers want/need from their school leaders and what administrators need to know about the 504 process.

Contactwww.mslbd.org "School Leaders’ Conference" for session descriptions, registration and hotel information. Early Bird discounts are available through Sept. 25, 2015. Teams of 3 or more receive a 15 percent discount. This is a conference you don't want to miss!

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Teacher Educators and Accomplished teachers
Pearson
Pearson is in need of educators to score edTPA! edTPA is designed for the profession by the profession, edTPA was developed by teachers and teacher educators from across the nation, in collaboration with faculty and staff from Stanford University, to support candidate learning and preparation program growth and renewal. Aligned with the Common Core State Standards and InTASC Standards, edTPA assesses teaching that promotes student learning in diverse contexts.
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CEC Policy Insider


Register for the 2015 Special Education Legislative Summit
CEC Policy Insider
Want to enhance your advocacy skills, learn about important special/gifted issues and early intervention, and take CEC's messages to Capitol Hill? Then come to the Special Education Legislative Summit July 12-15 in Alexandria, Virginia. Registration is easy, simply visit the Special Education Legislative Summit website, click the registration tab. Join us in July!
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National Center for Education Statistics releases The Condition of Education 2015
CEC Policy Insider
On May 28, the National Center for Education Statistics, part of the Institute of Education Sciences, released "The Condition of Education 2015," a Congressionally mandated report to the country on education in America today. The report presents 42 indicators grouped under four areas: population characteristics, participation in education, elementary and secondary education, and postsecondary education.
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IDEA Data Center releases technical assistance document
CEC Policy Insider
The IDEA Data Center recently released a technical assistance document that focuses on helping State Education Agencies and Local Education Agencies better understand CEIS and its reporting requirements. It also provides examples of various data collection and reporting methods that states use to collect and report CEIS data.
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National Center for Education Statistics releases public school safety and discipline: 2013-2014
CEC Policy Insider
A new National Center for Education Statistics "First Look" report offers nationally representative data on public school safety and discipline for the 2013-2014 school year. The report presents information on specific school safety and discipline plans and practices, training for classroom teachers and aides, security personnel, frequency of discipline problems and number of incidents of various offenses.
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Hot Topics: Subject line featured story

Summertime for special educators: Learn something new
By: Pamela Hill
If you are a special educator and have reached the last day of school, congratulations! At some time during this month all schools that follow a traditional calendar will provide a summer break of several weeks. The special educator will have an extended time to have a break from teaching. One area of personal and professional development that will help you to strengthen your thinking and teach you about walking in the shoes of a student with diagnosed learning disabilities is to learn something new.
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Legislation


$12.8 million in grants to improve services, outcomes for children with disabilities
U.S. Department of Education
The U.S. Department of Education announced the award of more than $12.8 million in grants to help improve services and results for students with disabilities. "We must ensure that students with disabilities receive a world-class education and that their teachers are equipped to help them be successful," said U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan.
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In the News


Reading, writing, required silence: How meditation is changing schools and students
The Huffington Post
On a Wednesday afternoon in early May, after a full day of studying the Byzantine Empire and sitting through lessons on annotation and critical reading, the sixth-graders in Zsazita Walker's social studies and language arts class were, expectedly, acting like sixth-graders. School was almost over and the classroom, scattered with posters, worksheets and lesson plans, was buzzing with chatty, curious 10-, 11- and 12-year-olds who knew they'd soon be free from class.
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Jailed youth with disabilities face poor treatment and support, report says
Education Week
Young people with disabilities who end up in the juvenile justice system are too often denied the educational, mental health, and re-entry services that can help them avoid jail in the future, according a report from the National Disability Rights Network, in Washington. The report "Orphanages, Training Schools, Reform Schools and Now This?" notes that studies suggest that 65 to 70 percent of youth in the juvenile justice system have mental health disabilities.
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The constant movement in ADHD may help children think, perform in school
Medical News Today
The constant movement of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder may be distracting — but the fidgeting also may improve their cognitive performance, a study by researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute has found. The take-away message: The hyperactivity seen in ADHD may help children think. The study of pre-teens and teenagers with ADHD examined how movement — its intensity and frequency — correlated with accuracy on cognitively demanding tasks requiring good attention. It found that participants who moved more intensely exhibited substantially better cognitive performance.
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Teaching students with autism spectrum disorder
Scholastic Administrator Magazine
Chris Cooper, a fourth-grade teacher at Moorlands Elementary in Kenmore, Washington, says he didn’t have students with autism in his class for the first half of his 22-year career — at least none that he was aware of. But that has changed over the past decade. "It's not unusual to have one or two kids on the spectrum in a classroom anymore," he explains. Cooper's experience reflects wider trends in the diagnosis of autism. In 2000, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that one in 150 children were identified with the disorder. Today, that number is one in 68 — with boys at five times higher risk than girls.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Replacing filler in special education documents (Edutopia)
Few states have replenished education funds cut during recession (McClatchy Washington Bureau)
Students with disabilities face uncertain paths after graduation (Education Week)
Still more questions than answers about how to treat ADHD (The Washington Post)
The daily habits of organized kids (ADDitude Magazine)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Disability? In college? Advice from a professor who wants to help
Psychology Today
The Americans With Disabilities Act protects students with conditions that impede normal life functions from discrimination. "Normal life functions" include going to school. I know much more than I want to about this act, because my son is chronically ill from one of many invisible illnesses. He has severe, chronic migraines that leave him in pain much of the time. The American with Disabilities Act also protects children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression and a host of learning disabilities.
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Educators need to include teens with disabilities in sex education courses, advocates for students say
The Oklahoman
Elijah McNabb knows the assumptions people make when they see his wheelchair. Sometimes, people start conversations with the assumption that McNabb cannot understand them. McNabb, who was diagnosed with cerebral palsy as an infant, cannot walk, but does not have any intellectual impairment. And throughout high school, the 17-year-old Edmond teen wanted to date and hang out with girls, but again, the assumptions.
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Co-teaching and specially designed instruction: Is it happening?
Education Week
Christina Samuels, a contributor for Education Week, writes: "A few weeks ago, I sent out a message on Twitter asking teachers to get in contact for a story I was writing on co-teaching. I was exploring whether special educators feel that they are getting an opportunity to use their expertise in the classroom, or if they feel that they are relegated to a 'helper role.' Special education is defined in the Individuals with Disabilities Act as 'specially designed instruction, at no cost to the parents, to meet the unique needs of a child with a disability.' Note that this definition talks about an individual child's unique needs—not classroom-wide interventions for all of the students who may be struggling."
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For kids on the spectrum, intervention offers long-term gains
Disability Scoop
A new study is validating the long-term success of an early autism treatment. The Early Start Denver Model is a nonmedical treatment for children age 12 to 48 months who show symptoms of the developmental disorder. While autism is usually diagnosed in children between the ages of 2 and 3, a growing body of research suggests that diagnosing it early and intervening with one-on-one, parent-led treatment can reduce symptoms in the long run.
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Insecticides may affect cognitive development in children
Nature World News
Insecticides may affect cognitive development in children, according to a new study. Pyrethroid insecticides are one of the most commonly used pesticides, with benefits in a variety of sectors including residential pest control, public health and agricultural purposes. They can also be found in many domestic products such as lice shampoo and mosquito repellent. With more toxic compounds such as organochlorides, organophosphates and carbamate having been banned due to health concerns, pyrethroids are now increasingly popular, and considered relatively safe for humans and mammals.
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What to tell the school about your child's ADHD and medical needs
ADDitude Magazine
Each September parents of kids with attention deficit disorder (ADD/ADHD) go through the same drill. You may wish to say nothing, but you absolutely must inform the school nurse, the classroom teacher, and other educational staff about your child's condition. If you're lucky, there will be an Individualized Education Plan or a 504 Plan in place, both of which identify and mandate the services and accommodations your child needs. If not, it's up to you to make sure that everyone involved understands how to best help your child.
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CASE Weekly Update
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Articles appearing in CASE Weekly include recent stories in the media related to Special Education and may not directly reflect the views and position of CASE. The appearance of advertising in CASE Weekly does not constitute CASE endorsement of any product, service or company or of any claims made in such advertisement.

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