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As 2012 comes to a close, CASE would like to wish its members, partners and other industry professionals a safe and happy holiday season. As we reflect on the past year for the industry, we would like to provide the readers of the CASE Weekly Update, a look at the most accessed articles from the year. Our regular publication will resume next Monday, Jan. 7.


 In the News

Steep cuts to special education, disability programs loom
Disability Scoop    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Sept. 24, 2012 issue: The White House is warning that special education will face more than $1 billion in cuts and millions more will be trimmed from other federal programs for people with disabilities next year unless lawmakers act. In a report sent to Congress, the Obama administration painted a stark picture of what's to come, detailing the impact of more than $100 billion in automatic spending cuts that are scheduled to take effect Jan. 2. More



Why do so many teachers quit their jobs? Because they hate their bosses
The Atlantic    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Nov. 26, 2012 issue: What's the reason so many new teachers quit the profession or move to a different school? The heavy workload? Low salary? A paucity of classroom resources? An absence of autonomy? The "always-on," continually demanding nature of the work? None of the above. The main reason is their principals. To find out what factors influence novice teachers' decisions to leave the teaching profession, Peter Youngs, associate professor of educational policy at Michigan State University and Ben Pogodzinski of Wayne State University, working with two other colleagues at Michigan State, surveyed 184 beginning teachers of grades one through eight in eleven large school districts in Michigan and Indiana. Their study was recently published in Elementary School Journal. More

States get millions to train special educators
Disability Scoop    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Oct. 8, 2012 issue: Nearly two dozen states will benefit from millions in new federal funding to improve training for those working with special education students in the nation's schools. The U.S. Department of Education says it is sending more than $24 million to 22 states. The funding is intended to help recruit and retain highly-qualified special educators, support teachers in blending the needs of those with disabilities and the new common core standards and train educators to utilize positive behavioral interventions and supports, among other initiatives. More



The other achievement gap: Children with learning disabilities
Education Week    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Oct. 22, 2012 issue: Just in time for Learning Disabilities Awareness Month, a new report is out that discusses how to help more children with dyslexia become proficient readers. Without these students — who combined with other students with learning disabilities make up about 5 percent of the school-age population — schools can't overcome the achievement gap, the report notes. More

Sleep problems linked to need for more special education
WebMD    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Sept. 17, 2012 issue: Young children who snore or have trouble sleeping through the night are more likely to need special education, a new study shows. Researchers looked at more than 11,000 children in southwest England. They found that breathing problems during sleep, such as snoring or problems such as regularly refusing to go to bed, waking up in the night and having nightmares through age 5 were associated with a greater chance of needing special education at age 8. Overall, breathing problems during sleep were linked to a nearly 40 percent increased risk of needing special education. Children with the worst breathing problems had a 60 percent greater need for special education. More


Literacy Tools
That Help Students Succeed
Award-winning WordQ helps each student address reading and writing gaps to meet Common Core proficiency requirements. Using WordQ, teachers can provide differentiated instruction with greater ease and flexibility. Extend learning time and opportunities; ideal for ELL students and all students who struggle with reading, vocabulary, spelling, syntax, grammar, text production, editing and revising.
MORE
SRA Reading Laboratory 2.0
Digital
• Any device anytime,   anywhere
• More than 85% new content

Interactive
• Motivating short reads with   text dependent questions
• Simple Management tools   for teachers

Personalized
• Improve students' Lexile®   scores with access to   complex text
• Informational and literary   text based on their interests
• Reports on Lexile® level,   student progress, standards,   and fluency
AutismPro
AutismPro provides online tools to help school districts meet state compliance and due process requirements in supporting students with Autism and Related Disorders. It's a comprehensive suite of professional development and case management resources for educators and professionals working with students with ASDs.


Study: Inclusion may not be best after all
Disability Scoop    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Nov. 12, 2012 issue: Inclusion is often believed to be the best option for students with disabilities, but a new study calls into question whether or not the practice truly leads to better outcomes long term. Researchers found that students with autism who spent 75 to 100 percent of their time in general education classrooms were no more likely to complete high school, go to college or see improvements in cognitive functioning than those who spent more time in segregated environments. More

New free font available to help those with dyslexia
Medical Xpress    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Oct. 8, 2012 issue: A new font tailored for people afflicted with dyslexia is now available for use on mobile devices, thanks to a design by Abelardo Gonzalez, a mobile app designer from New Hampshire. Gonzalez, in collaboration with educators, has selected a font that many people with dyslexia find easier to read. Even better, the new font is free and has already been made available for some word processors and e-book readers. The font, called OpenDyslexic, has also been added to the font choices used by Instapaper — a program that allows users to copy a Web page and save it to their hard drive. More

READ180

READ 180 is a comprehensive system of curriculum, instruction, assessment, and professional development proven to raise reading achievement for struggling readers in grades 4–12+. Designed for any student reading two or more years below grade-level, READ 180 leverages adaptive technology to individualize instruction for students and provide powerful data for differentiation to teachers. READ 180 helps target the specific skill deficits and unique instructional needs outlined in a student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP). Learn More


Schools see gains from positive behavior approach
Disability Scoop    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Oct. 22, 2012 issue: A first-of-its-kind study looking at a widely-used program designed to improve behavior finds that the strategy is proving effective for students with and without disabilities. Researchers at Johns Hopkins compared the experiences of students at 21 schools using the program known as School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, or SWPBIS, to kids at 16 schools that did not use the program over four years. They found that there were significant improvements in behavior, concentration, social-emotional functioning and pro-social behaviors at schools using the method. More

Transitioning students with disabilities into college and careers
ED.gov Blog    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Nov. 26, 2012 issue: Scott Rich is a prime example of how a student with disabilities can be successful. Rich was diagnosed with autism at the age of three, and behavioral problems affected him throughout elementary school. He had difficulty engaging to the point that he was expelled on several occasions, and during middle and high school, he suffered anxiety and time management issues. Today, life for Rich is an entirely different story. At age 29, Rich has earned his M.A. in Special Education, a B.A. in Geography, and a Minor in Special Education. Rich now works as an outreach advocate and is mentoring students with special needs and autism. More


ChalkTalk™ - An on-demand video interview series

ChalkTalk™ videos are cost-effective and are available "on demand". The talk show format focuses on educational issues and best practices in educating students with disabilities. Information is available at your fingertips, as the videos become an archived electronic library that you can access at any time. Click here to learn more!
Caselite
A web-based system that addresses the challenge of intervention scheduling in the schools. It's designed for anyone who needs to schedule and document interventions. MORE


New tools developed to better treat ADHD patients in early stages
Medical News Today    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Nov. 5, 2012 issue: Mayo Clinic researchers presented new findings on the early treatment of child and adolescent attention deficit hyperactivity disorder at the American Academy of Childhood and Adolescent Psychiatry annual meeting in San Francisco. They include a method to get better input from parents and teachers of children who are being diagnosed with ADHD for the first time - allowing for more effective treatment upon the first consultation. Researchers also showed how a tool can help clinicians better diagnose and treat children who have both ADHD and oppositional defiance disorder. More

UPCOMING EVENTS





Event       Location     Dates Notes

CASE Winter Conference       Orlando, Fla.     Feb. 13-15 This is a hybrid conference. You can attend in person or via the Internet.
Daily Themes:
Applying Virtual Education
Integrated Education for ALL
Re-Inventing/Re-Booting SPED

CASE EC       San Antonio     April 2 More information to come.

CASE Member/BOD Meeting       San Antonio     April 3 More information to come.

CASE Night       San Antonio     April 4 More information to come.

 

CASE Weekly Update
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Hailey Sasser, Senior Education Editor, 469.420.2630   
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Articles appearing in CASE Weekly include recent stories in the media related to Special Education and may not directly reflect the views and position of CASE. The appearance of advertising in CASE Weekly does not constitute CASE endorsement of any product, service or company or of any claims made in such advertisement.

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