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As 2013 comes to a close, CASE would like to wish its members, partners and other industry professionals a safe and happy holiday season. As we reflect on the past year for the industry, we would like to provide the readers of the CASE Weekly Update, a look at the most accessed articles from the year. Our regular publication will resume next Monday, Jan. 6.


In the News

'Mainstreaming' special education students needs debate
The Wall Street Journal
Americans tend to be a vocal people, sharing their views about almost any issue in the public sphere loudly and frequently. Yet on the question of how to provide special-education services to students who need them — while not compromising the interests of children who don't — many parents of regular-education students have opted out of any public discourse. Nationwide, about 60 percent of students with disabilities spend at least 80 percent of their instructional time in regular classrooms. Many parents of other children in public schools understand that when teachers focus on students who need more attention, their kids may get shortchanged. Yet most parents opt out of any discussion and don't complain.
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Common Core's promise collides with IEP realities
Education Week
One of the most promising elements of common academic standards for students with disabilities, say experts in special education, is that they offer explicit connections from one set of skills to another. That is particularly important for students served under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. For years, the law has pushed schools and districts to provide students access to the same academic curriculum available to the general school population. One way to do that, the law says, is through "standards-based" individualized education programs, or IEPs, instead of educational plans that focus mostly on skills that do not connect to a cohesive academic goal.
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8 things to know about dyslexia
NBC News
Dr. Joseph Sirven, a contributor for NBC News, writes: "My parents instilled in me the value of education in providing opportunities in life. As a doctor, preventing and solving medical problems that can disrupt education at an early age is something I believe we both as individuals and as members of the Latino community must address. Dyslexia is one of the most common learning disorders that can lead to problems with education, but if identified early, academic concerns can be potentially averted. Here are 8 things you need to know about this condition."
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ADHD kids often show autistic traits
Psych Central
Children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder often exhibit autistic traits, which can lead to even greater problems with socialization, according to new research presented at the 26th European College of Neuropsychopharmacology Congress. Previous research has shown that children with autism spectrum disorder often also have a diagnosis of ADHD. This new study suggests that the reverse may also be true.
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Implementing Common Core for students with disabilities
eSchool News
A new website for students — and in particular, those with disabilities — is offering free "anytime, anyplace" resources, materials, and information to help schools ensure that their students meet the Common Core State Standards. Created by the Center for Technology Implementation, the website for students with disabilities, PowerUp What Works, links evidence-based practices, Universal Design for Learning and technology to guide teachers, school leaders, professional development facilitators and teacher educators in their professional learning.
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    Congress rewrites IDEA funding rule
    Disability Scoop
    A small change tucked inside a government spending bill may have big implications for special education. Lawmakers included language clarifying the penalties that states may face if they fail to adequately fund education programs for students with disabilities. The issue has become significant in recent years as states struggled financially in the recession and some sought to cut education spending. Under federal law, special education funding must be maintained or increased from one year to the next. If states fail to meet what's known as "maintenance of effort" without obtaining a waiver from the U.S. Department of Education, they can lose out on future federal dollars.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        Recognizing the signs of dyslexia (Leader-Post)
    How an iPad can overcome 'print disabled' curriculum (eSchool News)
    Researchers explore links between learning disorders in children (Medical News Today)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


    How peanuts became Public Health Enemy No. 1
    Education Week
    Researchers aren't sure why, but over the past several years, the number of children reported to have allergies has doubled, to 5 percent of children in the United States. Yet at the same time, in schools and elsewhere, allergies have drawn what some see as an oversized amount of attention. A new paper out of Princeton University explores why that may have happened.
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    Brain imaging study eliminates differences in visual function as a cause of dyslexia
    Science Daily
    A new brain imaging study of dyslexia shows that differences in the visual system do not cause the disorder, but instead are likely a consequence. The findings, published in the journal Neuron, provide important insights into the cause of this common reading disorder and address a long-standing debate about the role of visual symptoms observed in developmental dyslexia. Dyslexia is the most prevalent of all learning disabilities, affecting about 12 percent of the U.S. population. Beyond the primarily observed reading deficits, individuals with dyslexia often also exhibit subtle weaknesses in processing visual stimuli.
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    1 in 50 school-aged children in US has autism
    HealthDay News via WebMD
    The number of children in the United States with autism spectrum disorder has jumped dramatically since 2007, federal health officials reported Wednesday. As of 2012, one in 50 kids between the ages of 6 and 17 has some form of autism, compared with one in 88 only five years earlier, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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    Reading the brain: FDA approves first scan for diagnosing ADHD
    TIME
    It's the first test to diagnose the behavioral disorder using brain wave patterns, but it won't be the last. The idea of reading the brain's activity for clues to mental illness is gaining ground. As Roxanne Khamsi reported in TIME recently, researchers are learning enough about the signature patterns of normal, and abnormal brain activity that they believe it may be possible to diagnose mental illnesses ranging from depression, schizophrenia, autism and attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder by studying readouts of brain waves, much in the way they now rely on elecrocardiograms to diagnose heart problems.
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    5 learning techniques psychologists say kids aren't getting
    Psychology Today
    J. Richard Gentry, an author and expert on childhood literacy, reading and spelling, writes: "My guest poster, Steve Peha, founder of Teaching That Makes Sense, Inc., comments on recent psychological research showing that kids spend more time using the five least effective learning techniques than they do using the five most effective and what we should do about it."
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    The genetics of dyslexia and language impairment
    Medical News Today
    A new study of the genetic origins of dyslexia and other learning disabilities could allow for earlier diagnoses and more successful interventions, according to researchers at Yale School of Medicine. Many students now are not diagnosed until high school, at which point treatments are less effective.

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    'Mainstreaming' special education students needs debate
    The Wall Street Journal
    Americans tend to be a vocal people, sharing their views about almost any issue in the public sphere loudly and frequently.

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    E-readers can make reading easier for those with dyslexia
    Smithsonian via Science Daily
    As e-readers grow in popularity as convenient alternatives to traditional books, researchers at the Smithsonian have found that convenience may not be their only benefit.

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    How iPads and tablets are changing the face of special education
    We are Teachers
    The past three years have seen a sea change in the use of technology in special education. The introduction of the iPad, followed by numerous other tablets, has put technology into the hands of students in a way unprecedented in the years before. The tablets have succeeded so quickly in part because they are portable, intuitive to use and provide a modality of learning with an element of fun.
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    The genetics of dyslexia and language impairment
    Medical News Today
    A new study of the genetic origins of dyslexia and other learning disabilities could allow for earlier diagnoses and more successful interventions, according to researchers at Yale School of Medicine. Many students now are not diagnosed until high school, at which point treatments are less effective. The study is published online and in the American Journal of Human Genetics.
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    ADHD: How many children are misdiagnosed?
    NBC Latino
    A year ago, psychiatrist Leon Eisenberg, considered to be the "scientific father of ADHD," was quoted in a last interview before his death as saying that "ADHD is a prime example of a fictitious disease." His comment certainly has caused an uproar not just among the medical community, but with parents, too. And this is easy to understand given that the number of children diagnosed with ADHD has seen a dramatic increase in recent years. According to this article in the World Public Union, "in the United States every tenth boy among 10-year-olds already swallows an ADHD medication on a daily basis." And the numbers are rising. In fact, the CDC recently released data from a 2011–2012 study that showed that an estimated 6.4 million children ages 4 through 17 have received an ADHD diagnosis.
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    To read better, dyslexics may need to speed things up
    Discover Magazine
    "Slow down. Sound it out." This is the mantra for most dyslexic students learning to read. But results from a new computer training program suggest that the opposite may be true for dyslexics once they've learned to read — going faster could improve reading skills and comprehension. Researchers in Israel compared the reading skills of dyslexic and nondyslexic university students, before and after using a custom computer training program. The program's premise is this: a sentence appears on the computer screen, which the participant is supposed to read silently.
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    CASE Weekly Update
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