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National Technology Week
CCTT
National Technology Week is Canada's national showcase of exciting career choices available in applied science and engineering technology. Held annually during the first week of November, National Technology Week offers a host of activities along with interactive and fun resources to help students, teachers and parents explore technical careers, particularly the 14 different fields in which over 512,000 technicians and technologists contribute to Canada's workforce.
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Technology could help stop cellphone use behind the wheel
CTV News
Steps must be taken to dissuade drivers from illegally using cellphones while behind the wheel to prevent the risk of injury to other motorists or pedestrians, says an editorial by two Canadian doctors. And paradoxically, they write in British Medical Journal, technology itself may provide the solution. Dr. Barry Pless and son Dr. Charles Pless of Montreal say although there is still scientific uncertainty about the link between cellphone use while driving and the risk of collisions, the proliferation of mobile phones means distracted driving is undoubtedly on the rise.
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Can mining recover
Macleans
For years, job seekers saw the mining industry as flush with promise. A skills shortage made for plentiful job opportunities, generous salaries and lots of chances to travel. "That's actually what attracts them: money first and travel second, by a huge proportion," says Scott Dunbar, the interim head of the University of British Columbia's mining engineering department, citing frequent inter-program surveys. "The actual interest in the work involved seems not to play a big role," he adds, laughing.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

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Calgary startup Slyce acquires York University technology to help its app see better
Financial Post
You could think of Slyce's latest acquisition as a pair of glasses — albeit, in software form. The Calgary-based visual search company, which is developing a mobile app that can identify consumer products using a smartphone's camera, announced that it had acquired computer vision technology developed at York University to help augment and improve the accuracy of its existing tech.
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Without innovation, nothing
Vancouver Sun
In a scene from Stanley Kubrick's remarkable movie 2001: A Space Odyssey, an ape throws a bone into the air and it transforms into a spacecraft travelling to a moon base. This fragment of boundary-stretching cinematic innovation — it's been described as the boldest flash forward in film history — expresses in a simple image the essence of a complex idea.
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Technology could help stop cellphone use behind the wheel
CTV News
Steps must be taken to dissuade drivers from illegally using cellphones while behind the wheel to prevent the risk of injury to other motorists or pedestrians, says an editorial by two Canadian doctors. And paradoxically, they write in British Medical Journal, technology itself may provide the solution.

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Ryerson set to specify, make funding multiply
The Eyeopener
Ryerson will need to specialize in a specific subject area or research intensity to access government funding according to a new differentiation policy set to take place in the spring of 2014. The plan will only distribute funding to schools who have specified areas of interest, allocating funding based on their strengths.

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NASA offers space tech grants to early career university faculty
Space Ref
NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate is seeking proposals from accredited U.S. universities on behalf of outstanding early career faculty members who are beginning their independent careers. The grants will sponsor research in specific, high priority areas of interest to America's space program.

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Drill developed by Canadian firm for moon would kick-start space mining industry
Hamilton Spectator
A space drill developed by a firm based in Sudbury, ON, could be boring for water on the moon in less than five years — if everything goes according to plan. It would also signal the start of the space mining industry. Deltion Innovations has announced it's been awarded a contract by the Canadian Space Agency to advance the design of its "DESTIN" drill and then test it in a moon-like environment on Earth.
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Scientists add sense of touch to robotic hand, a step to more life-like prosthetics
Vancouver Sun
To feel what you touch — that's the holy grail for artificial limbs. In a step toward that goal, European researchers created a robotic hand that let an amputee feel differences between a bottle, a baseball and a mandarin orange. The patient only got to experiment with the bulky prototype for a week, and it's far from the bionics of science fiction movies. But the research released is part of a major effort to create more lifelike, and usable, prosthetics.
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U.S. may force cars to communicate with each other
CBC News
Your car might see a deadly crash coming even if you don't, the government says, indicating it will require automakers to equip new vehicles with technology that lets cars warn each other if they're plunging toward peril. The action, still some years off, has "game-changing potential" to cut collisions, deaths and injuries, federal transportation officials said at a news conference.
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Innovation Weekly
Frank Humada, Director of Publishing, 289.695.5422
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Daniel Carelli, Content Editor, 289.695.5417   
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