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Thousands of students cheating at university
CBC News
Results of a CBC survey of 54 Canadian universities show that almost 7,000 students were punished for cheating in 2011-12, representing less than one per cent of the total student population. Of these cases, plagiarism was the biggest offender, found in more than 50 per cent of cases — unauthorized aid and inappropriate collaboration accounted for 22 per cent, and cheating on tests made up 10 per cent of cases. However, Julia Christensen Hughes, Dean of the College of Management and Economics at the University of Guelph, said that student surveys show that more than 50 per cent admit to various forms of cheating.
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Report recommends introducing high school streams later
Toronto Star
A new report by independent advocacy group People for Education says students shouldn't have to decide between taking academic or applied classes in high school until the "upper secondary" years — Grades 10 and 11. Based on surveys of Ontario schools and international evidence, the report concludes that the current age at which students choose their stream (Grade 8) in Ontario is too young, and that the province should follow the lead of countries like Finland, Spain and Poland in changing that age. The authors say choosing too early can affect students' academic achievement, limit or cut off PSE options and even influence whether they graduate — they add that the students most affected are those from lower income households.
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Looking to hire? Put a world of experience to work for you — at no cost to you
CCTT
Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) and Skills International are proud to present a Virtual Career Fair for Newcomers on March 26th, 2014. Using cutting edge technology, this dynamic virtual environment will allow your organization to connect with job-ready candidates in your region, across Canada and even internationally in a time and cost-saving manner.

Your company needs highly motivated, skilled workers to address critical skills gaps. In addition, in the coming years, it will be increasingly important to connect with international talent before they arrive in Canada. The greater your pool of potential recruits, the better your chance of finding that next great employee.

This Virtual Career Fair is a great opportunity to discover international talent while exploring new recruitment technologies. It includes the following components at no cost to your organization:

• A customized virtual career booth created for you, branded specifically for your company;
• Live text chats on the day of the event with job-ready, internationally-trained professionals;
• Confidential resume submission process;
• Ability to post specific job postings, engage in informational interviews or provide details of potential opportunities in your company; and
• Free training prior to the event on use of the Virtual Career Fair platform

If you are interested, please contact Dhan Lamba-Thebeau via e-mail at Dhan.Lamba-Thebeau@cic.gc.ca or by phone at 613-991-2429.

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Free coding bootcamp #HTML500 aims to solve Canada's tech skills shortage
Canadian Business
Business has long and loudly lamented the growing skills mismatch in Canada's workforce. What young people choose to study and what post-second­ary schools teach seldom matches up well with what employers need. Recently in Vancouver, B.C., 50 employers, including Telus and Hootsuite, took the rare and laudable step of actually doing something about it. Five hundred people sit around tables inside a cavernous rail maintenance building, laptops at the ready.
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Edmonton Catholic School District students gain experience by constructing modular classrooms
Edmonton Examiner
Students from the Edmonton Catholic School District (ECSD) are building on their future as they construct moveable classrooms to help take the pressure off over-crowded schools. Registered Apprentice Program (RAP) and work studies pupils in Grade 11 and 12 at St. Joseph and Holy Trinity High Schools gather on the former's campus to work on six portables (five 25-student classrooms and one bathroom) to be sent to Monsignor William Irwin Elementary in southwest Edmonton.
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Thousands of students cheating at university
CBC News
Results of a CBC survey of 54 Canadian universities show that almost 7,000 students were punished for cheating in 2011-12, representing less than one per cent of the total student population. Of these cases, plagiarism was the biggest offender, found in more than 50 per cent of cases — unauthorized aid and inappropriate collaboration accounted for 22 per cent, and cheating on tests made up 10 per cent of cases.

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Technology could help stop cellphone use behind the wheel
CTV News
Steps must be taken to dissuade drivers from illegally using cellphones while behind the wheel to prevent the risk of injury to other motorists or pedestrians, says an editorial by two Canadian doctors. And paradoxically, they write in British Medical Journal, technology itself may provide the solution.

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Skills shortage top concern, employers say
Toronto Star
Canadian employers' top concern is the shortage of skilled workers but they're divided on how to address the issue, a survey to be released. About half of the employers surveyed say its up to them to offer more training, while the other half believe job seekers must come with the right skills and attitude, the survey for a non-profit career counselling research organization found.

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BlackBerry goes back to basics in quest to recover customers
Conntecting the Australian Channel
BlackBerry unveiled a new, cheaper touchscreen smartphone and a "classic" model with a keyboard, as it tries to stem losses and win back once-devoted security-conscious business and government users. The news, coupled with more details about the company's strategy in its services business, helped send shares in BlackBerry surging more than nine per cent.
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715 new planets discovered by NASA
CBC News
The Earth's galaxy is looking far more crowded. NASA has confirmed a bonanza of 715 newly discovered planets outside the solar system. Douglas Hudgins, NASA's exoplanet exploration program scientist, called the announcement a major step toward the planet-hunting Kepler telescope's ultimate goal: "finding Earth 2.0." It's also a big step in "the possibility of life elsewhere," said Lisa Kaltenegger, a Harvard and Max Planck Institute astronomer who wasn't part of the discovery team.
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Space 'harpoons' could snatch samples of asteroids and moons
Space.com
Why bother landing softly on an alien world to collect samples if you can just snag material with a harpoon from afar? Using a set of long-lined, hard-hitting harpoons would allow a mission to grab large samples from multiple locations on an asteroid or moon — and to get them from beneath the surface, where some of the most interesting material lies, say researchers developing the idea.
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Innovation Weekly
Frank Humada, Director of Publishing, 289.695.5422
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