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CCTT wins CIC award for new Engineering Career Pathways Tool
CCTT
The Canadian Council of Technicians and Technologists (CCTT) received an award from Citizenship and Immigration Canada for the newly-launched Engineering Career Pathways web tool. Parliamentary Secretary, Hon. Costas Menegakis presented the prestigious award to CCTT Chair Louis LeBel on behalf of Minister of Citizenship and Immigration Chris Alexander at the second annual IQN Awards hosted at the Museum of Civilization in Gatineau, QC. The award was presented to CCTT for innovation and leadership in the "Overseas" category which focuses on pre-arrival supports for skilled workers immigrating or considering immigrating to Canada.
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Changes to Citizenship Act could deter international students
Maclean's
Recently-announced changes to the Canadian Citizenship Act could have a negative impact on the number of international students who come to Canada to study PSE, reports the Canadian Press. The government will be taking away a provision in which every day spent in Canada as a non-permanent resident counts as a half day of residence needed for a citizenship application, up to a maximum of two years. In addition, changes to the act will increase residency requirements for citizenship so that international students will have to be living in Canada four out of six years, rather than the current three out of four years, to qualify for citizenship. "We're taking away one of our major selling points," says Debbie Douglas, Executive Director of the Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants.
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Ontario to roll out K-12 career/life planning policy
London Free Press
The Ontario government will this fall be rolling out a new career — and life-planning program at elementary and high schools that aims to help students begin getting ready for their careers from Kindergarten through Grade 12. The policy, Creating Pathways to Success, provides the framework from which each school board can work to implement its own version of the program. The policy focuses on three key goals: ensuring students make informed career and education choices, giving students learning opportunities about careers inside and outside the classroom, and engaging parents to be part of the planning.
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Letter from Grade 6 class calls out Alberta's rude politicians
CTV News
A Grade six class has taken Alberta's top politicians to task for childish behaviour, but opposition politicians say it's the speaker who needs to sit in the corner. A letter made public this week from Innisfail Middle School informed the legislature that the students will no longer attend question period after watching repeated displays of rudeness, name-calling and offensive language. The school, in the letter dated last November, said while all parties were at fault, students were particularly appalled over the behaviour of two of Premier Alison Redford's cabinet ministers.
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Canadians feel skills shortage will continue to be an important issue in 2014
Ipsos
According to a new survey conducted by Ipsos Reid on behalf of Randstad Canada, addressing the gaps and shortages in skills valued in the workplace continues to be of the utmost importance. Nine in 10 (91 per cent) working Canadians believe that the skills shortages and skills gaps will continue to be an issue of importance for 2014. The data also reveal what managers and employees feel is the most pressing issue facing their organization for the coming year with a lack of skilled trade workers (16 per cent) rising to the top of the list.
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Changes to Citizenship Act could deter international students
Maclean's
Recently-announced changes to the Canadian Citizenship Act could have a negative impact on the number of international students who come to Canada to study PSE, reports the Canadian Press. The government will be taking away a provision in which every day spent in Canada as a non-permanent resident counts as a half day of residence needed for a citizenship application, up to a maximum of two years.

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Technology could help stop cellphone use behind the wheel
CTV News
Steps must be taken to dissuade drivers from illegally using cellphones while behind the wheel to prevent the risk of injury to other motorists or pedestrians, says an editorial by two Canadian doctors. And paradoxically, they write in British Medical Journal, technology itself may provide the solution.

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Skills shortage top concern, employers say
Toronto Star
Canadian employers' top concern is the shortage of skilled workers but they're divided on how to address the issue, a survey to be released. About half of the employers surveyed say its up to them to offer more training, while the other half believe job seekers must come with the right skills and attitude, the survey for a non-profit career counselling research organization found.

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Space is our future
Huffington Post
The dawn of the space age occurred when the then Soviet Union launched Sputnik one. This very small satellite was in orbit for three months before burning up in the Earth's atmosphere, as is the eventual fate of all of the other 3000 satellites orbiting the Earth right now. So why is this important? Other than worrying about them possibly falling on your head; how does this affect your daily life? Well, if you shop or make your bank transactions online, use your GPS to find where you are going, check the weather on your cell phone, then you are using these satellites.
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Read a novel in 80 minutes? There's an app for that
CBC News
If you've always wanted to read War and Peace, but thought you'd need to be some sort of superhero speedreader to make it through Tolstoy's lengthy tome, then a new app might offer you a sense of hope. After working for three years in self-described "stealth mode," U.S. technology start-up Spritz is ready to go public with its speedreading app — also named Spritz — which will be released for the upcoming Samsung Galaxy S5 smartphone and the Gear 2 watch.
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