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Number of jobs requiring college, university education grows in past 2 years
Statistics Canada
Statistics Canada released a report exploring employment changes across industries during the economic downturn and recovery. Employment changes across industries also changed the skill profile of Canadian occupations, the study notes. Between January 2011 and January 2013, occupations requiring a college education or apprenticeship training increased by 267,000, or five per cent. Occupations requiring a university education rose by 120,000, or 4 per cent. The report notes that growth was more mitigated among occupations requiring a secondary school diploma or less (62,000, or one per cent).
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3 ways to bridge Canada's innovation gap
Toronto Star
Innovation accelerates society's capacity for revitalization and growth. It's a phenomenon that flows from the optimized interplay of the right inputs. But what are they? Educational attainment is part of it, and so is wealth and so is political will. The gap for Canada is our under-utilization of universities as hubs for innovation, the absence of robust access to capital and our dangerous retreat from basic research.
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Computer science enrolment low, despite opportunities
Yahoo! News via CBC News
Computer science students at the University of Windsor enjoy a perfect job placement rate, but the school says not enough people are entering the field. Ziad Kobti, the director of the university's school of computer science, says part of the problem is due to government cutbacks that have resulted in some high schools losing their computer labs.
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U.S. business groups worried by cybersecurity law aimed at China
Yahoo! News
The U.S.-China Business Council criticized a new law aimed at thwarting cyber attacks by discouraging the Justice Department and several other government agencies from buying information technology systems from China. "The national security of the United States is critical, but it must not be used as a means of protectionism," John Frisbie, the group's president, said in a letter urging leaders in the Senate and the House of Representatives to block similar measures in the future.
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Government of Canada supports youth in biotechnology sector
Canada Newswire
"Our government's top priorities are creating jobs, economic growth and long-term prosperity," said Dr. Leitch. "Through our grants, tax credits and support for training programs, we are helping youth to gain the skills and experience needed to prepare for and succeed in the workforce." Bioscience Education Canada received $50,000 in federal funding to organize the Sanofi BioGENEius Challenge Canada competition and encourage more youth to pursue jobs in Canada's growing biotechnology sector.
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Retirement, expansion fuels mining industry's need for skill
Northern Ontario Business
Retirement and expansion in Northern Ontario's mining industry means companies will be hard-pressed to replenish the ranks. A report commissioned by the Mining Industry Human Resource Council and the Algoma Workforce Investment Committee released in late February presented a picture of what lies ahead to attract people to mining jobs.
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EcoPark: A great idea whose time has come
Hamilton Spectator
The park project, Conservation Hamilton says, will restore the former Veldhuis greenhouses property besides the almost-two-century-old Desjardins Canal in Dundas, ON, and acquire natural lands between Dundas and Highway 6; from the Niagara Escarpment to Cootes Paradise and Hamilton Harbour.
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Number of jobs requiring college, university education grows in past 2 years
Statistics Canada
Statistics Canada released a report exploring employment changes across industries during the economic downturn and recovery. Employment changes across industries also changed the skill profile of Canadian occupations, the study notes.

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Engineering Month: Booming demand for civil engineers
Financial Post
As chair of the civil engineering and environmental and engineering department at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Roger Cheng will tell you that when it comes to graduates, "They all get hired. It's is one of the most in-demand disciplines and there is certainly a shortage right now."

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Agreement between Northern College and Queen's University in Kingston
Mining.com
Northern Ontario Business reports that the Northern College and the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science at the Queen's University in Kingston have signed an agreement. The goal is to offer a Mining Engineering Degree program at Northern's Porcupine Campus.

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Hospital gets recycling grant
Windsor Star
A University of Windsor student's waste reduction and recycling plan will make Hotel-Dieu Grace Hospital "a provincial leader" when it comes to reducing hospital solid waste. Hotel-Dieu received a $300,000 provincial grant Friday thanks to Taylor Purdy, 23, a master's student in environmental engineering, who has worked with HDGH's environmental services team since last spring.
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Calgary teen wins top biotechnology prize for cancer research
The Globe and Mail
A Grade 11 student at Webber Academy in Calgary, Mr. Nair is this year's winner of the Sanofi BioGENEius Challenge Canada, a daunting biotechnology competition that seeks to identify and develop promising young scientists. Mr. Nair's research delved into a still-experimental technique known as "photothermal therapy." The method involves the use of gold nanoparticles — microscopically small clusters of gold atoms that can be engineered to accumulate around tumour cells. When exposed to infrared light, the gold heats up rapidly and can disrupt the tumour cells without harming healthy cells nearby.
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Canadians worry about lack of future leaders
Benefits Canada
Canadian employers continue to worry about the lack of future leaders in their organization, according to a survey of more than 2,000 senior human resource executives in 14 countries by Right Management, the talent and career management experts within ManpowerGroup.
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Gulf of Mexico cleans itself naturally after massive oil spill
Vancouver Sun
Three years after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, scientists gathered by the Gulf of Mexico are making a surprising claim: The massive spill wasn't a long-term disaster at all. The Gulf and its shores recovered much faster than expected thanks to an amazing "self-cleaning" ability, they have revealed: An explosion of natural, oil-eating microbes quickly destroyed most of the oil.
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Harvard scientists discover new method for creating biological polymers
The Harvard Crimson
Professor David R. Liu and coworkers have reported a new synthetic method of directly building polymers by reading the genetic code off of DNA. According to Liu, this method could eventually lead to the discovery of useful new biological compounds. The human body constantly reads genetic code off of DNA, otherwise know as deoxyribonucleic acid, onto RNA, or ribonucleic acid, and then uses ribosomes, cellular structures, to translate genetic code and build a chain of amino acids linked in a specific order.
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