This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




Text version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit April 17, 2015

Home   About Us   Links   Programs & Services   Contact



Green Centre Canada

Chemistry is at the heart of everything we do.

 


Happy National Volunteer Week!
CCTT
We'd like to take a moment to thank all the dedicated, hard-working and passionate volunteers from across Canada who work so hard to make their communities, our country, and the world a better place to live. We offer you our heartfelt gratitude!

From all of us at CCTT and CTAB, we wish you a very happy National Volunteer Week!
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article




The changing face of volunteering in Canada
CharityVillage
The recent Global Volunteer Conference addressed the vital role of volunteers in an increasingly polarized and fragmented world, calling on all sectors to make volunteering a priority and to recognize the contribution of volunteers in making the world a better place.

Canadians continue to rise to this challenge, generously volunteering more than two billion hours annually — the equivalent of 1.1 million full-time jobs. The latest statistics (2010) show that more than 47 per cent of Canadians volunteer an average 156 hours each year. Many Canadians volunteer out of a desire to contribute to their communities, to use their skills and experience, and because they have been personally affected by the cause.

But for both volunteers and the organizations that depend on them, the traditional attitudes toward volunteering are in flux. CharityVillage spoke with volunteer managers to get a sense of this changing face of volunteerism in Canada.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


New report suggests students choosing academic stream too young
CCTT
A new report by Ontario's People for Education suggests that the practice of choosing academic or applied streams in grade 8 is putting some students at a disadvantage. The study found that students who chose applied courses in grade 8 were much less likely to attend university, and that a larger proportion of students from low-income households were enrolling in the applied stream. In addition, the report states that courses are not covering the same essential concepts regardless of stream, and that stream choices made in grade 8 were carrying through the remainder of high school, even though students have the ability to transfer to another stream. The report authors recommend delaying course decisions that are potentially binding until after grade 9.

CBC | Toronto Star | People for Education News | Full Report

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


Anti-rollover technology supported by Ottawa, trucking association
CBC News
A push to legislate anti-rollover technology in trucks has the support of a provincial trucking association and the federal government. The Ontario Trucking Association says sensors can help prevent rollovers and wants to see them legislated. Electronic stability control systems help to prevent rollovers through sensors installed in the truck and can determine when a slippage or jackknife situation occurs, correcting the tractor trailer unit before an accident takes place.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Saanich teen's newest invention can use hot coffee to power devices
Global News
Ann Makosinski hasn't had an ordinary adolescence. From appearing on the Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon, to being named one of Time Magazine's 30 Under 30, the 17-year-old from Saanich has attracted international attention for her invention — a flashlight powered by the heat of the human hand. "I definitely find a lot of satisfaction in finding out how things work and putting things together," she says.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Los Angeles Dodgers turn to technology in hopes of engaging fans
Wall Street Journal
By now, it is no secret that health care and consumer products companies are jumping into the fitness-tracking industry. Your favourite sports team may be next. The Los Angeles Dodgers are looking to work later this summer with start-ups focused on sports technology, in hopes of finding new ways of engaging fans with the team.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
New inexpensive aluminum-ion battery set to outlast competitors
The Globe and Mail
Lithium-ion batteries may be on their last charge. Stanford University researchers have unveiled the world's first long-lasting, fast-charging, inexpensive aluminum battery. The Stanford team said the technology could replace many commercial batteries in use today, including the lithium-ion batteries that power everything from iPhones to pacemakers to Tesla Motors' electric cars.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
This simple technology could greatly increase subway capacity at little cost
Vox
New York City is currently in the process of constructing a $4.5 billion Second Avenue subway line. The project is important: it will deliver much-needed relief to the overcrowded Lexington Avenue subway line in a city that is utterly dependent on mass transit to move people around. But is the multi-billion-dollar subway line actually necessary?

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more



Patent trolls targetted in latest tech industry battle
CTV News
Just as Alex Haro and Chris Hulls raised $50 million for their mobile app, Life360, the business partners got a letter. It said they had three days to pay licensing fees to a company they had never heard of because their app violated its patented technology. Haro and Hulls traced the company, Advanced Ground Information Systems, to a coastal home in Jupiter, FL, with a phone number that initially went to an anonymous voicemail. They couldn't find any employees on LinkedIn. To Haro, it was "a punch in the gut," he said.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


DARPA researchers plan software that will run for hundreds of years without upgrades
Slate Magazine
One of the biggest problems with enterprise software for business is just keeping it up to date. When you're running programs on a large scale, it's not so easy to just "do a quick restart" for updates and patches. But letting software become outdated leads to security and interoperability issues. So DARPA wants to create software that can run for more than 100 years, evolving so it won't need updates and restarts.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


This tech can turn food waste into graphene, power and fuel
Fast Co. Exist
Your forgotten, moldy leftovers and rotting banana peels may be eventually be reborn as graphene for batteries or hydrogen to power fuel cell cars. PlasCarb, a new E.U.-funded project based in the U.K., is working to perfect a process that turns food waste into valuable raw materials. The process starts by using anaerobic digestion to turn rotting food into biogas, something that's already being done at a grocery store chain to create electricity.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Apple just bought a company that will make the iPhone's camera even better
Business Insider
Apple has acquired LinX, an Israel-based camera technology company, for an estimated $20 million, according to CNBC. LinX builds "miniature multi-aperture cameras designed for mobile devices," hinting that this acquisition is aimed to improve the camera infrastructure in the iPhone. The company also builds these cameras for "tablets and ultra-books," so it's possible LinX's technologies will be used to improve the cameras in the iPad and Mac lines.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Google has patented the ability to control a robot army
Quartz
After recently getting a patent for giving robots personalities, Google now wants to unleash an army of Rodney Dangerfield bots on the world. In a patent awarded recently, the company outlines a system for "allocating tasks to a plurality of robotic devices." This sounds innocuous enough — it could mean linking a series of factory robots together, or perhaps a gaggle of Roombas to clean a large house — but the potential is much greater.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


How technology is changing speech and language therapy
The Guardian
Speech and communication skills are at the heart of human relationships — without them we couldn't share ideas and emotions. But technology is carving out a special role in boosting those skills. Pioneering research shows just how machines are helping people to make themselves understood. Here we look at three projects where a range of academic specialists and industry partners have come together to develop and widen access to their innovations.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


High-tech drones will be fitted to U.S. Navy submarines
Tech Malak
The U.S Navy will go ahead with plans to launch its first Underwater drones from Virginia-class attack submarines, which will be in use later in 2015 As technology rapidly advances, its uses are finding its way into more military applications at an astonishing pace. The Navy plans to deploy the Remus 600 Unmanned Underwater Vehicle, or UUV, which is a 500-pound, 3.25 meter long, dual-frequency side-scanning sonar technological device.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    The high-tech battle against pirates (Popular Science)
Vegas arena to use facial scan technology (Sportsnet)
Novel photolithographic technology that enables control over functional shapes of microstructures (Phys.org)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

Innovation Weekly
Frank Humada, Director of Publishing, 289.695.5422
Download media kit

Katherine Radin, Content Editor, 289.695.5388   
Contribute news

This edition of Innovation Weekly was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!







50 Minthorn Blvd., Suite 800, Thornhill, ON, L3T 7X8